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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Time Travel for Dummies

When my accountant said, "Hey, you've had another good year," my response was, "You've got to be kidding!" But then, looking back, I remembered some happy referrals, several fascinating consignments and, in general, quite a bit of successful book scouting. Ten Pound Island's invoices and check stubs (all digital!) told the story in detail. My "new business model," concocted so painfully over the past year, paid off. I dropped the California, Florida, and New York book fairs, cut expenses way back, moved from hard copy to web based catalogs, and quoted a lot more books using specially tailored, richly illustrated e-based catalogs.
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Article

Lost Lincoln letter returned to the Archives

The Washington Post reports: "A Civil War-era letter written by Abraham Lincoln that went missing at an unknown date has surfaced and has been returned to the National Archives . … An Archives employee saw the document listed for sale in 2009 and recognized it as belonging to the government. When contacted, Panagopous who was representing a family from Rhode Island in the sale, had already sold the documents to a New York dealer. Upon realizing the provenance of the papers, Panagopulos refunded the purchase price to the dealer to get them back and the Rhode Island family, in turn, agreed to refund the money they had been paid so the papers could be retuned to the government."
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Article

The Art of American Book Covers – The Arncliffe Puzzle

One of the mysteries that was unsolved at the time of our first exhibition of American Decorated Publishers' Bindings 1872-1929 was the artist responsible for the cover of The Arncliffe Puzzle. It has always been one of my favorites, with a hooded figure blending from within to outside a red-orange circle, holding a gold question mark like a sickle in one hand, and its gold dot like a ball in the other. It is one of the best examples of an artist playing with the picture plane on a book cover, using both color and imagery to achieve the effect.
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Congrès

Bologne 2010

Bologne accueillera un évènement d’importance, le Congrès International de la LILA, du 20 au 26 septembre 2010. Après plus de 20 ans, l’association italienne a de nouveau l’honneur – et la responsabilité – de l’organiser, avec l’aide des services de Noema Congressi, qui a organisé avec succès 6 éditions d’Artelibro à Bologne, ainsi que la foire de l’ALAI à Milan en 2008.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and Prints - Japanese Surimono

Surimono, meaning "printed thing," are a subsection of traditional Japanese woodblock prints. They were printed on commission in small numbers and generally not sold by art publishers, unlike their more commercialized companions, ukiyo-e woodblock prints. Known as far back as the early 18th century, surimono rapidly rose in popularity in the 19th century. They were printed on high-quality paper, called hôsho-gami, using the finest printing techniques. Prior to 1810, these sheets could be quite large and folded so that the illustration accompanying the text faced outward. Later into the 19th century, however, sizing of surimono became more standardized and most were printed on small, nearly square sheets called shikishiban.
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Article

People, Prints and Progress – Or, Why are Prints Important?

First, the basics: a print is a repeatable image made by a variety of processes, usually on paper or fabric (sometimes other materials like treated animal skin). Ink is transferred from the printing surface – usually a metal plate, woodblock or limestone block – by exerting pressure, usually by means of a press. The most widely practised traditional processes include woodcut and linocut, etching, engraving, lithography, and, in the 20th century, screenprinting. One person's idea of what constitutes a print is often very different to another's. For much of my specialist period, the 18th and 19th centuries – much of it pre-photography – printing was the only medium of mass visual communication. So the prints I sell can be illuminating 'primary sources' for our history.
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