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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
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Foires

The ABA Chelsea Rare Book Fair 2017 - Finding the perfect Christmas gift, join guided tours or a book signing

Held each autumn in the beautiful and historic Chelsea Old Town Hall, the Fair brings together more than 80 exhibitors specialising in antique books, first editions, maps, prints, and manuscripts from all over the world. Prices begin at just a few pounds and dealers are happy to guide you, making this an accessible and exciting venue for beginning collectors or those simply looking for an extra special Christmas gift.
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Libraires

First editions and lasting treasures: how to be a book collector

Thinking of investing in rare books? Do it for the love of books, not money, say the expertsRare and antiquarian books can be surprisingly valuable. A first-edition copy of Ulysses by James Joyce, published in Paris in 1922, can sell for €100,000 and sometimes much more; Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, published in London in 1726, up to €50,000. But, like art, most books will never become really valuable, and collectors are generally motivated by love of literature and books rather than the prospect of making a fast buck.Repost from The Irish Times, first published 26 August 2017.
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Manuscrits

Germany buys back 1000-Year old Liesborn Gospels

Printing with movable types was only invented 500 years later, the Liesborn Gospel from the year 980, one of the oldest manuscripts still in private possession has now returned to its original place, the diocese of Münster in Germany after a 3Mill Euro investment by the German state and a number of regional trusts.
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Libraires

Wenn's um die Wurst geht - Aus dem Leben eines Antiquars (German language only)

Über eine bekannte Angebotsplattform für antiquarische Bücher erreichte uns kürzlich eine Anfrage. Der Kunde interessierte sich für einen Brief von Ernst Barlach. Wie immer hatten wir den Text transkribiert, die historischen Hintergründe des Briefes ebenso wie die Vergleichspreise der letzten, sagen wir, 20 Jahre, gründlich recherchiert und den Brief samt Inhalt und Adressaten so ausführlich wie möglich (und nötig) beschrieben. Nun war ein Foto gewünscht. Natürlich kamen wir diesem Wunsch gern nach, denn auch wenn jedes Foto eines Unikates dieses Unikat dem Mainstream etwas näher bringt, ist es verständlich, dass niemand die Katze im Sack kaufen möchte. Auf unsere umgehende Beantwortung der Bildanfrage flatterte uns ein Angebot ins Haus:
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

The National Library of Ireland - James Joyce and Oliver St. John Gogarty

Thomas W. Lyster had been director of the National Library of Ireland since 1895. He was famous for his researches about Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and translated H. Düntzer's biography about the German poet into English. Lyster edited the anthology ‚English Poems for Young Students' – and became a key figure in the most important 20th century novel: "Ulysses", by James Joyce. In his article for the German "Literaturblatt", Rainer Pörzgen describes the library and its characters, and compares fiction with reality.
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Article

The Book Illustrations Of Humphrey Bogart's Mother

In 1898, Baby's Record was published by Frederick A. Stokes Co. of New York. Issued in three simultaneous editions featuring one, six, or twelve color illustrations, the book was by Maud Humphrey, who, in the same year, married Dr. Belmont De Forest Bogart. A year later, on Christmas Day, she bore a son. The couple named him Humphrey.
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Article

Agatha Christie: Unrivaled, Record-Breaking Crime Novelist… And One of My Favorite Authors (Hence this Blog)

Murder on the Orient Express. And Then There Were None. Murder at the Vicarage. The Body in the Library. A Murder is Announced. By the Pricking of My Thumbs. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. 4.50 From Paddington. What do all of these titles have in common? Besides great plots, inventive narratives and extremely competent character development? They were all written by the "Queen of Crime", Dame Agatha Christie. Christie is said to be the best-selling novelist of all time (according to the Guinness Book of World Records) with over 2 billion copies of her novels sold and having been translated into 103 different languages. Reputedly, Christie is the third most popular author of all time, with regard to sales figures, finishing behind just William Shakespeare and the Bible. Furthermore, Christie's stage-play "The Mousetrap" is the longest running (straight-play) stage production of all time, having opened in London in November 1952 and still being performed, with over 25,000 performances to date. How did this lady crime-novelist get to be so popular? How did her (seemingly average) life influence her writing? And perhaps the most important question of all… Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?!? (Just kidding, no spoiler alerts necessary). Stay tuned.
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Article

40 first Danish editions of milestones in world literature

Meet the Danish booksellers on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day, 23 April, in Copenhagen! Members of the Danish Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (ABF) will hold an ILAB Pop Up Book Fair tomorrow in the main hall of the National Library of Denmark, in the center of Copenhagen. On this occasion Herman Lynge & Son will be exhibiting 40 first Danish translations of milestones in world literature including works by authors such as Cervantes, Shakespeare, Adam Smith and Darwin. The full list can be viewed here on the ILAB website.
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Article

People, Prints and Progress – Or, Why are Prints Important?

First, the basics: a print is a repeatable image made by a variety of processes, usually on paper or fabric (sometimes other materials like treated animal skin). Ink is transferred from the printing surface – usually a metal plate, woodblock or limestone block – by exerting pressure, usually by means of a press. The most widely practised traditional processes include woodcut and linocut, etching, engraving, lithography, and, in the 20th century, screenprinting. One person's idea of what constitutes a print is often very different to another's. For much of my specialist period, the 18th and 19th centuries – much of it pre-photography – printing was the only medium of mass visual communication. So the prints I sell can be illuminating 'primary sources' for our history.
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Article

Collecting History - Two Hundred Years On, Napoleon Is Still Much More Interesting than Arthur Wellesley

Despite astonishing and terrifying the world with his lightning manoeuvres and remorseless expenditure of human lives, Napoleon and Republican France were ultimately crushed. Exhausted by constant total warfare rather than strategically defeated on the battlefield, Napoleon left France economically ravished and decisively toppled from its position as the most powerful European nation. Thus this final battle, Waterloo, is rightly regarded as one of the most pivotal moments in Modern British history, ushering in a century of rapid economic and colonial expansion, and global naval domination. It is perhaps no coincidence then that our recent post-colonial age has seen these wars and their principle players romanticised by novelists such as Bernard Cornwell, Patrick O'Brian, C. S. Forester, and Douglas Reeman. These patriotic pseudo-historical accounts, often based on extensive research, present the British armed forces at their best – fighting as heroic under-dogs for the last time while saving the rest of Europe from French Republican autocracy. Cornwell's creation, the Richard Sharpe series, is perhaps the most interesting of these, since the eponymous protagonist manages to be present not only at most of the important battles of the Peninsula War in Portugal and Spain, but also at the Siege of Copenhagen, the naval battle of Trafalgar, and of course the coup de grace, Waterloo.
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