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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
Bookhunter on Safari - Confessions
Bibliophilie

The Confessions of a Book-Hunter – 1926

Publié le 21 Juil. 2018
“I belong to that class of unfortunate beings who are addicted to a habit which it is not easy to break off. This sounds alarming, but let me assure you that neither drug nor dram is the cause of my undoing, and that I have no intention of following in the foot-steps of the English Opium-Eater. The truth is that I am a bibliophile, and I suffer a complaint common to the tribe, namely a feverish appetite which can only be assuaged by choice tit-bits in the form of ancient quartos and duodecimos”.
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Histoire

#Mandela100 – Mandela’s legacy and the Mandela Archive, Johannesburg

Publié le 21 Juil. 2018
Today, July 18, 2018, the world celebrates Mandela’s 100th anniversary. In 1962 at the age of 44, Mandela was arrested when South Africa’s apartheid regime took drastic measures against political opposition, in particular against members of the African National Congress (ANC). Nelson R. Mandela passed away in December 2013 but has remained an icon for democracy, freedom and the fight against a racial and class divide.
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Rebecca Lawton
Manuscrits

'My year in St. Andrews was one of the best in my life'‘

Publié le 21 Juil. 2018
Rebecca Lawton (M.Litt Mediaeval History 2015) has been working on a collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts as part of a collaborative PhD between the University of Leicester and the British Library. ILAB would like to share her original blog post to demonstrate the work and research currently taking place in the field of rare books.
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

50th Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair 2011

"Rare Booksellers are generally regarded as highly individual and are not easy to move to participate in joint ventures", wrote former VDA President Günther Mecklenburg in his foreword to Catalogue 1 of the 1st Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair in 1962. A rather pessimistic statement – that soon turned out to be the contrary. In 1962, the Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair was the initial spark. It triggered a boom that invigorated and changed the antiquarian book market in Germany as only the Internet has done since then. As the oldest antiquarian book fair in Germany and the second oldest fair in Europe (after the London International Antiquarian Book Fair), it has resisted all economic crisis. Rare book dealers and collectors from all over the world have made the Stuttgart Fair one of their annual meeting places to buy and sell what is unusual, rare and beautiful.
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Article

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein - Monster Book Sells for Monster Price at the London International Antiquarian Book Fair

Over 1,000 people visited the London International Antiquarian Book Fair on the first day, with a record-breaking queue when the Fair opened its doors at 3pm on Thursday June 13, 2013 at the National Exhibition Hall at Olympia, West London. This resulted in an 18% increase in visitor numbers on the first day compared to the 2012 Fair and this trend continued with visitor numbers up on both of the following two days.
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Article

The American Gift Book

In France the first gift book may have been ALMANACH DES MUSES, first published in 1765. This format was copied in Germany in 1770 with the publication of MUSEN-ALMANACH. In the 1790s some anthologies appeared in England that were clearly intended to be given as gifts, like ANGELICA'S LADIES LIBRARY, OR PARENTS AND GUARDIANS PRESENT (1794), which was followed by THE ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY (1799, 1800), edited by Robert Southey, and including twenty-seven poems and epigrams by Coleridge, plus contributions by Charles Lamb and Southey himself. A third volume was planned, but never appeared. These proto-gift books did not start a trend, and I know of no similar anthologies published in England during the next two decades. In the early years of the nineteenth century in Germany, some gift books (taschenbuch) were being issued in glazed paper boards, and in 1822 Rudolph Ackerman used those as his model when he published the first English gift book, the FORGET ME NOT, which he would publish without interruption for the next twenty-five years. Gift books like Ackerman's, which were issued year after year, became known as gift annuals, literary annuals, or simply "annuals." Since not all "annuals" were exclusively literary in their content, I will use the term "gift annual" to describe them as a subset of the broader family of gift books.
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Article

The Life of Bernard M. Rosenthal

"In order to prepare the descriptions, we have committed the cardinal sin of the bookseller: we have READ most of these books, or at least we have read in them, an unpardonable and economically quite ridiculous procedure which has, however, brought some surprising results."
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Index Librorum Prohibitorum and The Private Library

For a little over 400 years - from 1559 to 1966 - the Roman Catholic Churchproscribed what could and could not be read by the Catholic faithful in a series of lists of prohibited books, the infamous Index Librorum Prohibitorum.
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