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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
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Renaissance

Rare Books - When is an inscription not an inscription?

Publié le 14 Oct. 2014
Two folks identified the key elements of this month's crocodile mystery in their comments: Misha Teramura correctly noted that the inscription in the middle of the page - "pp. 184-190 refer to the progress of religion westward toward America" - refers to George Herbert's final poem from The Temple, "The Church Militant." And David Shaw noted that the other inscriptions - "8652″ on the top left and "A176″ on the bottom right - look to be an accession number and a shelf mark. But let's back up for one moment to understand why I find these marks interesting. The book in question is a first edition of George Herbert's The Temple (STC 13183). It's an interesting work, and a popular one in the 17th century. And as you can see from the notations on the front pastedown and the recto of the first free flyleaf, it's a work that was prized by later collectors.This particular copy was owned by Sir Leicester Harmsworth before it came into the Folger Shakespeare Library collection, and its value is shown in part by the blue goatskin binding signed on the bottom turn-in by Riviere and Son. Its value is more obviously indicated by the inscription on the pastedown, "a copy sold in the Terry sale in Dec 1935 for $3600."
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Renaissance

The Giunti of Florence. A Renaissance Printing and Publishing Family

Publié le 24 Oct. 2012
This ambitious project explores the history and output of the Giunti Press in Florence, covering the firm from its beginnings in 1497 to its end in 1625, and providing descriptions of each Giunti book published with extensive indication of the libraries holding copies of each edition. In doing so, it describes the literature and history of Florence in the late Renaissance as well as the development of the Italian language within this important period of time.
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Renaissance

The Library of Symbolism - A Glossary and Bibliography of Renaissance Symbolic Literature

Publié le 09 Nov. 2010
"For 2,000 years, from the time of Plato in 400 BC until the start of the modern era of empirical science in approximately 1600 AD, the culture of Western Europe was dominated by a single mode of expression: the symbol. The symbol was the universal medium for the approach to God, for the investigation of the natural world, for the interpretation of the Scriptures and for an understanding of and a guide to proper moral conduct. Towards the end of the period, enabled by the invention of printing by movable type, this obsession was translated into a vast literature of symbolism of which some eighty distinct species were identified by contemporary writers and theorists." The Renaissance symbolism refers to a time in which human thinking and the human view of the World changed radically. On the one hand Renaissance symbolism is one of the most interesting research fields for scholars. On the other hand it is one of the most fascinating fields of bibliophily at the very beginning of the history of printing.
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Cataloguing Rare Books – Sh*t Explosion

Still too gimpy to drive across the state, so I was skipping the Albany Book Fair that weekend. But Dan Gaeta, who was doing the show, called to tell me about an interesting item he'd found. It's nice to have friends! (Dan operates John Bale Book Co., a café and book shop in Waterbury, CT. Talk about a simple but effective website, check ou t John Bale Books) Anyway, since I've been home all week, grumpily compiling my next catalog, and since I don't have a book fair to report on, I thought I'd talk a little about my catalogs.
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Article

History of the London International Antiquarian Book Fair - Founded in 1958

The idea that the ABA could organize book fairs to give provincial antiquarian booksellers (of which there was still at least one in most of Britain's market towns in the 1950's) a temporary shop window in London came from a small group of booksellers who, in the summer of 1957, rented one of Sotheby's galleries in Bond Street during the auctioneer's closed season and offered their books for sale on some simple shelving.
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Article

Melbourne Rare Book Week - July 18 to 28, 2013, incorporating ANZAAB’s 40th Australian Antiquarian Book Fair

The Australian and New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers is proud to present its 40th Australian Antiquarian Book Fair, to be held from Friday July 26 to Sunday July 28 in the University of Melbourne's historic Wilson Hall. Fine, rare and collectable books, prints, maps and ephemera will be offered for sale by leading Australian and international booksellers. Explore the world of books with knowledgeable booksellers specialising in subjects as diverse as art, literature, travel, Australiana, fine bindings, militaria, sport, natural history, children's books, maps and prints. Entry to the Book Fair is free.
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Article

Virtual or real?

Phil Patton about the advantages of having good literature on the iPhone and the incomparable joy of having a real book in his hands. Pros and cons of digital libraries ...
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Linguistic Adventures

Some years ago I bought a copy of "Bizarre Books, a compendium of classic oddities" (New York, 2007). Books like that are not only fun to read but also very useful as a reference work when hunting for 'bizarre books'. Books with funny titles, obscure topics and unusual stories, especially the older ones, make me curious and greedy. Most of them are hard to find though. The first title I bought after reading 'Bizarre Books' was a "Handbook on hanging" (London, 1928). Thanks to internet it came all the way from a little brick and mortar bookshop on Isle of Arran (of all places…) to my private library near Amsterdam. But the book that really caught my attention was "An Irishman's Difficulties with the Dutch Language" (Rotterdam, 1908) by 'Cuey-na-Gael'.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Truman Capote

The books of the tiny terror of New York drawing rooms continue to be eagerly sought after. A young phenom, his books were mostly published in relatively large (for the time and genre) first printings. Thus when collecting Capote it is even more important then usual to look for particularly fine copies, as mediocre copies of most of his books abound.
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