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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
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Art

The Art of American Book Covers - Evangeline Mary Daniell

Publié le 12 Déc. 2014
I only know of one cover by Evangeline Mary Daniell, who also went by the signature "Eva," but it is such an exceptional Art Nouveau design that it's likely there are others to be found. Please do post a comment if you know of any. Her monogram EMD is on both the cover and dust jacket of the first printing of The Seven Seas by Rudyard Kipling, the first American edition, published by Appleton in 1896. The monogram was removed from the cover on the 1897 and subsequent editions, but remained on the jacket. Three copies were in the first exhibition of American Decorated Publishers' Bindings 1872-1929 (2005).
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Art

Veronese, His Legacy, Among 17th Century Book Publishers, Art Collectors, & Printmakers

Publié le 02 Mai 2014
This essay is an immersive, illustrated review of the spectacular Veronese show at the Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida (2012-13); but it also educates readers on Veronese's legacy in the 17th century among book publishers, printmakers, and (mostly) Stuart art connoisseurs. Drawing upon an extended Gallery of Images (21 images, including some fine installation shots, all with extended caption notes by the author), the essay demonstrates the fabled invention, wit, and clever humor of this "Happiest of Painters", as Henry James wrote of Veronese. The essay gives special prominence to the currency of Veronese in the 17th-century book culture and print culture (Images 6,7,14). The author's dedicatees are three prominent book specialists: Robert J. Barry, Jr.; John T. Shawcross; and Peter A. Tasch.
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Art

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - New York, New York!

Publié le 28 Oct. 2013
Like the architect and sculptor Max Bill, Welti (1891–1934) belonged to the artistic new wave which characterised Zurich in the late 1920s, experimenting with abstract art and Dadaism. In 1932, it was Welti who was asked by Wilhelm Wartmann, director of the Zurich Kunsthaus, which was mounting a major Picasso retrospective, to look after the Spaniard during his visit. These early lithographs arose out of a visit Welti made to New York thanks to a 'Swiss Economic Study Tour to America', an initiative begun after the First World War.
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Art

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Who is Anne Marie?

Publié le 18 Juil. 2012
As personal papers and archival collections are increasingly sought after by librarians and collectors, we have accordingly been conducting a fair bit of original cataloguing of various special collections materials in order to keep up with the demand. I've thus become better at identifying and describing the papers and ephemera of obscure authors and artists, and even a few famous punk rockers unknown only to me; but every now and then I am confronted with anonymous or original materials of considerable interest which I cannot identify, despite my best efforts. Here for example is a hand-painted illustration from the 1930s signed "AM". Can anyone identify this Unknown Woman?
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Art

Publishing the Fine & Applied Arts 1500-2000

Publié le 10 Juil. 2012
This new volume of the Publishing Pathways series examines the relationship between the business of print and the practice of art and design across five centuries. It explores the role played by the book trade in the diffusion of artistic and architectural theory, fashion, and practice, and traces the impact of advances in the techniques of binding, color printing, and illustration on the appearance of books. Among the topics discussed are the printed sources for decorative motifs in sixteenth-century churches, the publication history of the works of Andrea Palladio, and the evolution of drawing manuals in seventeenth-century England. Other subjects include the library formed by the architect Sir John Soane, developments in nineteenth-century art publishing, and the role of printed catalogues in documenting the acquisitions made by English collectors of paintings, sculpture, and antiquities.
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Art

Peter Paul Rubens and 17th Century Book Arts

Publié le 23 Mai 2012
Specialists on 17th century books and book arts may enjoy viewing Maureen E. Mulvihill's illustrated exhibition review of the Rubens show at the Ringling Museum, Sarasota, Florida (February 17th-June 3rd, 2012). The review (12 pp, with a Gallery of Images from the installation) is published in Seventeenth-Century News (Spring-Summer, 2012). The Ringling's permanent collection includes five Rubens canvases (the Louvre, two). The show presents selections from Ringling's Rubens collection and many fine prints of the master's work (engravings, woodcuts) on loan from the Royal Museum of Fine Art, Antwerp
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Art

The Book Art of Richard Minsky

Publié le 18 Mars 2011
A new book about the famous book artist: Richard Minsky has been making and remaking artists' books for fifty years. "The Book Art of Richard Minsky", recently published by George Braziller, Inc., shows the best of it. The book itself is a piece of art, bound in a beautifully printed and embossed hardcover and filled with numerous illustrations. It invites readers - and admirers - to explore the sculptural book works of Richard Minsky.
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1 - 8 / 10

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Bread & Roses: The Strike That Changed Everything

Needless to say, few strikes in American history have generated as much literature, music or folklore as did Lawrence. Given our interest in the art and literature of social movements, we're unavoidably drawn to this material, as are our customers – it tends to come and go with some regularity. Here are a few recent acquisitions that are still with us, each interesting for its own reasons.
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Article

A Kindlier Dozen for All

That's got that schmaltz out of the way … It's 2012! If you're of an excitable bent, then it's the year the world ends according to the Mayan Calendar (or more likely when the Mayan Calendar ends according to the world). If you're literary then it's 200 years of Charles Dickens; the man who brought you Bah! Humbug!, spontaneous human combustion, a series of character archetypes that for good or ill (or as is more usual, both) have endured (and been endured) for a good century and a half, and a new, disturbing and moving understanding of what it might have been like to be poor and deprived at the height of the British Empire's prosperity. Oh, and jolly fat people with odd names, can't forget them.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Betty Smith

December 15 is the birthday of writer Betty Smith (1896), whose first novel, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943), became an instant bestseller. The semi-autobiographical book chronicles the struggles of an Irish-American family in New York City in the early part of the 20th century. The title is a reference to the Tree of Heaven, an invasive species from China that is found on vacant lots in New York. Its struggles for survival are the central metaphor of the book.
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Article

Books and Bombs - Book City Leipzig on 4th December 1943

The German Book and Writing Museum of the German National Library commemorates the destruction of the Leipzig booksellers' quarter 75 years ago with two projects.
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Article

Un Bibliophile de grand Ec(h)o

Fraîchement de retour du Louvre où il a été convié en tant que conservateur invité (pas moins que ça !), Umberto Eco inaugurera en septembre 2010 le Congrès et la Foire Internationale de la LILA avec sa conférence intitulée Le vertige de la liste et du catalogue.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and Ephemera - The GPS of the 1960s

Before practically everyone had one of these cunning little electronic navigation systems, there used to be road atlases. They were heavy and cumbersome and one had to flip from pp. 14/15 to 168/169 at a moment's notice, most often when you had just missed junction 5 or 6 or 7 on a major highway. In the 1960s someone recognized the problem and came up with an amazing little gadget which is, in some respect, even more practicable than the modern GPS (although without the lovely voice). Frank Werner has tested it for his new blog "Books and other Animals".
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