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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
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Femmes

Women's Work: women in Economics, Politics and Philosophy | New blog from Peter Harrington

Publié le 01 Nov. 2016
The contribution of eminent male thinkers to intellectual and public life is well documented: we all know our Kant from our Keynes, our Wittgenstein from our Wilberforce. It's no secret that women and women's issues have historically been granted less space on the political, philosophical and economic stages, and this deficit is unfortunately reflected in publishing history.
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Femmes

Collecting - America's Gibson Girl: the Good Years

Publié le 15 Déc. 2015
The period from 1900 to the First World War (what historian Walter Lord called "the good years" in America) was a rare time after plumbing and before the federal income tax was reintroduced, when Americans lived with confidence. Perhaps the epitome of that era was the Gibson Girl, an ideal of American feminism created by illustrator Charles Dana Gibson. She was beautiful, intelligent, sturdy and unruffled. She was created before the turn of the century and held sway for more than two decades.
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Femmes

Rare Book Selling - a Man’s World?

Publié le 16 Jan. 2015
"Women have less bite and competence", are "prone to self-doubt" and "fear of losing their livelihood". Women have a different time management system and "cannot handle large sums of money". Women are part-time booksellers and specialise in children's books, they "have a rich partner in the background", or they work in the profession until "Mr. Right" comes along and marries them. Good old prejudices – they still exist ...
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Femmes

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Betty Smith

Publié le 05 Déc. 2014
December 15 is the birthday of writer Betty Smith (1896), whose first novel, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943), became an instant bestseller. The semi-autobiographical book chronicles the struggles of an Irish-American family in New York City in the early part of the 20th century. The title is a reference to the Tree of Heaven, an invasive species from China that is found on vacant lots in New York. Its struggles for survival are the central metaphor of the book.
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Femmes

How Elizabeth Gaskell Saved Charlotte Brontë's Reputation

Publié le 28 Nov. 2014
Brontë's 1847 novel, Jane Eyre, earned the ire of critics for its frank depiction of passion in a woman - a governess, no less. Brontë was maligned as "unwomanly" and "unchristian." Poet Matthew Arnold wrote, "Miss Brontë has written a hideous, undelightful, convulsed, constricted novel... one of the most utterly disagreeable books I've ever read." The Quarterly Review asserted that Jane Eyre revealed "tone of mind and thought which has overthrown authority and violated every code human and divine." The novel had its share of defenders as well, not the least of which was fellow novelist Elizabeth Gaskell.
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Femmes

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Louisa May Alcott

Publié le 15 Sept. 2014
Louisa May Alcott (1832) is best remembered for her novels Little Women (1868), Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886), a trilogy set in Concord, Massachusetts, in the late 19th century. The books were loosely based on Alcott's life with her three sisters. Alcott never set out to write a trilogy but the books are linked by characters who appear in all three.
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1 - 8 / 26

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

A Kindlier Dozen for All

That's got that schmaltz out of the way … It's 2012! If you're of an excitable bent, then it's the year the world ends according to the Mayan Calendar (or more likely when the Mayan Calendar ends according to the world). If you're literary then it's 200 years of Charles Dickens; the man who brought you Bah! Humbug!, spontaneous human combustion, a series of character archetypes that for good or ill (or as is more usual, both) have endured (and been endured) for a good century and a half, and a new, disturbing and moving understanding of what it might have been like to be poor and deprived at the height of the British Empire's prosperity. Oh, and jolly fat people with odd names, can't forget them.
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Article

11th Australasian Rare Books Summer School

The State Library of NSW is delighted to host the 11th Australasian Rare Books Summer School. From 1 – 5 February 2016 three intensive five-day courses and a two-day short course will be presented by leading experts. The courses cover a wide variety of the history and study of rare books and manuscripts and give a thorough insight into the rare book business, both for newcomers and old-timers. Have a look at the schedule:
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Article

The Longest Banned Book?

The Roman poet Ovid not only had his book, Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) banned, but he himself was banished from Rome for writing it in the year 8 CE. All of his works were burned by Savonarola in his infamous bonfire of the vanities in 1497. Christopher Marlowe translated it in 1599, and his translation was banned. U.S. Customs banned it in 1930 - nearly two thousand years later. This makes it a candidate, if not the winner, of the dubious distinction of being the longest (in time) banned book.
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Article

The Top Five Children’s Libraries From Around the World

Libraries are not just for adults, and they are a wonderfully international experience. Go anywhere in the world and you'll find a place to gain access, have fun, and get an education. These are five of our favorite children's libraries from around the world.
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Article

The Girolamini Thefts in the Press: August 2013 to January 2014

More than a year has passed since the discovery of thefts from the Girolamini Library in Naples (Italy). The former library director, Marino Massimo de Caro, has been convicted to seven years in prison of being primarily responsible for the thefts. He now is under arrest in his house in Italy. Meanwhile a second issue has been brought to public attention: the dissemination of forgeries throughout the international antiquarian book market. In several official statements the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) and the Italian Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (ALAI) expressed their concern about these two major issues which bring up the prospect that books from the Girolamini Library or forgeries may surface on the market for years to come with little or no warning that they have been stolen or forged. A survey of press articles about the Girolamini thefts and the forgeries published between August 2013 and January 2014:
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