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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
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Baedeker

Collecting Baedeker Travel Guides

Publié le 24 Mai 2018
Baedeker's travel guides were the premium travel guides of the second half of the 19th and the first part of the 20th century, giving rise to the verse: "Kings and governments may err – but never Mr. Baedeker." They are keenly collected, and some of them are extremely rare, like the famous and seldom seen "Athen" Baedeker from 1896, which was not sold outside Greece.
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Female Marine and Her Sisters

Ann Thornton the female sailor and Sophia Johnson the friendless orphan are interesting in that their stories employ the same sequence of events that befell Elizabeth Emmons – personal tragedy, followed by cross dressing, followed by physical impairment. (Note Sophia Johnson's missing right arm.) Then there was Mary Lacy, "The Female Shipwright" who served four years at sea and seven years at Portsmouth Dock Yard in England, disguised as a man. Mary had a taste for young girls, and ascribed her troubles to a fondness for dancing with men - making for a delicious double reverse. However, the classic expression of this theme in American literature is the story of Louisa Baker, the Female Marine.
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Article

17th ILAB Congress at Cervia-Milano Marittima, September 1 - 6, 1964

Long long ago, when tourists still changed 1 $ for 624.90 Italian Lira and the League still united 14 national associations under its roof, when men went "fishing on typical Adriatic barges" and 200 ILAB dealers met in Ravenna to see books in chains, Dante's tomb, magnificent libraries, Venice, Pomposa, San Marino, Cesena, Chioggia … A report of the 17th ILAB Congress in Ravenna 1964, from the ILAB Archives.
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Article

The Cleveland Manifesto of Poetry, The Asphodel Bookshop and the Future of Bookstores

The Cleveland Manifesto of Poetry was published from Jim Lowell's Asphodel Bookshop in 1964, a year after the bookstore opened at 465 The Arcade. It prints statements by Russell Atkins, d. a. levy, Russell Salamon, Adelaide Simon, Jau Billera, and Kent Taylor. The statements still seem relevant today, especially those of Atkins and levy, whose manifesto begins "To write surface poems with the appearance of artificial flowers in order to communicate with persons by forcing them to resort to instinctive methods of understanding." It is a beautiful and surprising characterization of the concrete tendencies in levy's poetry and bookmaking.
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Article

Collecting Australian Bushranging Books

The Australian Bushranging era (1790–1890s) covered approximately the first 100 years of Australian settlement. Early bushrangers were mainly exconvict labourers from working class, Irish backgrounds who had been transported to Australia. Referred to in much of the literature as Bolters, they were rebels against authority who were attempting to survive in the bush by stealing from isolated settlers and travellers. The discovery of gold in the 1850's and 60's saw an upsurge in bushranging activity. Gold nuggets were relatively easy to steal, transport and sell and, because of this, many Australianborn sons joined the ranks of the bushrangers. A collecting tip by Maureen Fraher.
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Article

31st Amsterdam Antiquarian Book, Map & Print Fair, October 29-30, 2010

This year's Amsterdam Antiquarian Book, Map & Print Fair will be held on Friday, October 29 and Saturday, October 30 at the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam. For the first time both Dutch antiquarian associations, the NVvA (Nederlandsche Vereniging van Antiquaaren) and the BOB (Bond van Handelaren in Oude Boeken), have agreed to cooperate, resulting in up to 65 Dutch and foreign exhibitors. Publishers and bibliophile societies will also present themselves during the book fair.
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Article

The Aldine Italic

From our survey of fifteenth century types it would appear that every country had its formal pointed black-letter; every country, save England, its classical roman type; and every country - except, perhaps, Spain - its cursive vernacular black-letter type, copied from the handwriting of the locality and time. Before 1500 Italy had no vernacular type simply because the current handwriting of Italy (which was not of the black-letter school) was only translated into type-forms at the beginning of the sixteenth century.
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