Aller au contenu principal
Résultats: 1 - 8 / 25

articles

Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
1774_image1_dsc_0001_2.jpg
Internet

Online Sales – Getting Rid of the Middleman

Publié le 18 Jan. 2016
The vast majority of ILAB booksellers sell through the Internet. This does not mean that they have given up selling through more traditional methods (paper catalogues, book fairs, open shops, direct offers to customers, etc.); selling through the Internet is just another means of working. Whereas the vast majority of ILAB booksellers would definitely refuse selling all their wares through a middleman at book fairs, through their catalogues, etc., they find it very natural to do so online. The question is why?
[…] En voir plus
1318_image1_ilab_logo_2010.jpg
Internet

ILAB Website – Archived by the Bavarian State Library (BSB)

Publié le 19 Mars 2014
Open your browser, click on the OPAC catalogue of the Bavarian State Library (BSB) and search for: ILAB. The Bavarian State Library (BSB) as one of the largest research libraries in Europe administers a digital long-term archive in cooperation with the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre. This archive also stores websites of scientific relevance. Updates of the selected websites are added every six months, so users of the library will be able to see how the internet offers have changed, which content has been added over the years – and most of all: they will have the opportunity to get to know of the articles published in the internet which might otherwise be lost. The archive launched by the Bavarian State Library shows that websites and their content can be of permanent worth and become a part of scientific research. All archival copies will be permanently stored, indexed in the catalogue, and made available for open access. Further long-term preservation measures will be carried out if necessary, including, for example, format migration into newer formats.
[…] En voir plus
1314_image1_oxford_podcast.jpg
Internet

University of Oxford – Podcast on book historical topics

Publié le 11 Mars 2014
The Centre for the Study of the Book at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, is now offering podcasts on book historical topics. The series is hosted by Adam Smyth. His interviews with Oxford and visiting researchers like Willi Noel and Tiffany Stern highlight the current research on the material history of the book. The first podcasts include:
[…] En voir plus
1312_image1_gg_tough_life_1.jpg
Internet

Computers, or: the tough life of an antiquarian bookseller, part 1 and 2

Publié le 10 Mars 2014
My new computer is scheduled to arrive sometime next week. Maybe. Meanwhile I've been making do. The big screen in the illustration above is the monitor for my mortally ill computer, which can only run filemaker. So I catalog my books on that one, but slowly, or it'll freeze up. The little netbook is my Internet access – google, OCLC, ViaLibri and the like – also done slowly, since it's only got 2 megs of ram. (Just by way of comparison, my new machine will be delivered with 8 gigsof ram.) And the droid, of course, is for quick emails, texting, and other attempts to reach out from computer hell. - Greg Gibson about the tough technical life of an antiquarian bookseller.
[…] En voir plus
1298_image1_0_jimhead1_official.jpg
Internet

Algorithmic book pricing and its implications

Publié le 19 Fév. 2014
I was recently asked to offer comments on the issue of algorithmic book pricing for the newsletter of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association. The issue where the comments appear has now just arrived in the mail. Since the ABA newsletter reaches only a limited audience and has no online version I thought I should reproduce the text here, in case it might be of interest to others. Comments from readers who have actually used these services will be eagerly received.
[…] En voir plus
1267_image1_gg_shandy2.jpg
Internet

Can Your Kindle Do This?

Publié le 16 Déc. 2013
John Ledyard is a strange and fascinating American original. In 1772 he attended Eleazer Wheelock's Indian School, which would later become Dartmouth College. Unhappy there, he went off with the Indians. When spring rolled around he built himself an Indian-style dugout canoe, threw a bearskin around his shoulders, and sailed down the Connecticut River to his people in Hartford. Several adventures later he accompanied Captain Cook on this third voyage and was present when Cook was killed in the Sandwich Islands.
[…] En voir plus
1214_image1_dsc_4244.jpg
Internet

Searching For Books In The Digital Age

Publié le 15 Oct. 2013
Disruption came to the world of book searching and the result, for the consumers at least, was a dramatic change for the better. What was once impossible became possible. What was once difficult became simple. What was once costly became cheap. And the vast availability of books online, coupled with new and powerful tools to search for them, enabled serious bibliophiles to pursue their interests in ways that were unimaginable two decades before.
[…] En voir plus
1 - 8 / 25

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Melbourne Rare Book Fair opens tomorrow - Welcome by the ANZAAB President, Jonathan Burdon

Welcome to The Australian and New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers' sixth Melbourne Rare Book Week and its 45th Australian Antiquarian Book Fair!
[…] En voir plus
Article

A Bookseller’s Adventure in Europe: Part 1

"One of the joys of being a bookseller is the chance to take occasional trips overseas as part of my business. My latest adventure was a two week, three country trip by plane, train, car, and boat to England, the Netherlands, and Hungary (with an airport layover in Poland). I saw lots of old friends and made some new ones, bought books, finalized a publishing deal, and ate many great meals. The main purpose of the trip was to participate in the International League of Antiquarian Bookseller's (ILAB) Committee meeting in Budapest." Part 1 of Bob Fleck's adventures in Europe.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Erik Kiviat, William Wantling and the Ecosystem of the Mimeo Revolution

An example of bare bones mimeo, Head First struck me as presenting Wantling in his natural habitat; for Wantling, like Blazek and Bukowski, is the epitome of a Mimeo Revolution poet. Yet strangely, none of Kiviat's mags are featured in Secret Location. Neither is Blazek's Ole nor Bukowski's Laugh Literary. See a pattern here? It is high time to build on and tear down the foundations of Clay and Phillips' classic text. Documenting Midwest and blue collar mimeo would be a good start. A couple of posts down the line will complicate Wantling's image as a mimeo outlaw a little bit, but the Mimeo Revolution is all about myth and perception, so I think it is safe to say here that Wantling is most commonly viewed as an outlaw poet, who made his home in the land of the Gestetner.
[…] En voir plus
Booksellers

David A. Williamson

David A. Williamson began collecting Stephen King novels and memorabilia in the 1980s and has amassed a collection that ranks as one of the largest in the world. In 2009, he bought Betts Books and one of his greatest joys is helping other King collectors find that “special” collectible for their own collections. He lives in Fairfield, CT, is married and has three children. He has generously shared his collecting experience and expertise with Books Tell You Why in the following interview.
[…] En voir plus
Article

City of Encounters

There are a number of curious things about book-jackets. One is that after getting on for two hundred years of their history, we are still not entirely certain what to call them – dust-jackets, book-jackets, dust-wrappers, even dust-covers – all in fairly common usage, while a close study of G. Thomas Tanselle's masterly recent study, Book-Jackets : Their History, Forms and Use, gives us nineteenth-century examples of 'paper cover', 'slip-wrapper' (analogous with slip-case and which I rather like), and 'over-wrapper', while the earliest reference I've seen in an author bibliography (Stuart Mason, aka Christopher Millard, Bibliography of Oscar Wilde, 1914 – ignoring the preliminary editions) notes a number of examples of 'loose outer wrappers'. For my own part, I take the Tanselle line that 'wrapper' is a little dangerous in already having a long-established and alternative meaning in bibliography – referring to a stitched, stapled or glued and non-detachable cover, as for example on a pamphlet.
[…] En voir plus
fermer la fenêtre