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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
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Impressions anciennes

History of Printing in Austria - Druckfrisch. Der Innsbrucker Wagner-Verlag und der Buchdruck in Tirol

Publié le 04 Juin 2014
375 years ago Michael Wagner, a printer from Augsburg in Germany, founded a publishing house in Innsbruck, Austria, which is still existing today: Universitätsverlag Wagner. To celebrate the 375th anniversary of the publisher the Tyrolean State Museum Ferdinandeum has organized an impressive exhibition from 13th June to 26th October, 2014, accompanied by an attractive programme with lectures, concerts, guided tours, a children's workshop, and a conference with leading Austrian and international scholars and scientists, among them ILAB Patron of Honour Murray G. Hall.
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Impressions anciennes

A Brief History of Broadsides

Publié le 07 Juin 2013
Samuel F Haven, former librarian for the American Antiquarian Society, presided over one of the largest collections of broadsides in the world. Historians and rare book collectors alike cherish broadsides because they offer snapshots of moments in time, helping us to understand the zeitgeist of that era. Broadsides make ideal complements to a rare book collection, granting the collection greater depth and context.
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Impressions anciennes

The 15th Century Equivalent of Your Cat Walking on Your Keyboard

Publié le 26 Fév. 2013
"The 15th century equivalent of your cat walking on your keyboard", writes Rebecca J. Rosen, senior associate editor at The Atlantic, are ink pawprints in early printed books. "For cat owners, the scene is too familiar: You sit down to finally (finally!) get some work done, and along comes kitty, here to stroll across your keyboard." During the 15th century the ancestors of our beloved kitties walked across - incunabula. What is a big disgrace (or humiliation) for every serious collector, is nothing more than an everyday occurrence for cat lovers.
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Impressions anciennes

Early Engraver Played His Cards Right

Publié le 08 Nov. 2012
The "Meister der Spielkarten", or "The Master of the Playing Cards" is known only through the 106 engravings that have been attributed to him, including the set of playing cards that he is named for. The term "master" is reserved for someone who has completed an apprenticeship and ran his own workshop, teaching apprentices. His presumed students are also unknown but have similar names, such as "The Master of the Nuremberg Passion", "The Master of 1446", and "The Master of the Banderoles".
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1 - 8 / 17

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Book is the Weapon

I've often been told that the pen (and by extension, the book) is mightier than the sword. But what if the book is the sword? Uwe Wandrey's Kampfreime is a collection of rhymed chants meant for use during the German Student Movement. As far as my research can tell, it is also the first book to be designed as a weapon, and as such is a landmark in book design.
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Article

John Carter, ABC for Book Collectors

"Like all good reference books, the ABC for Book Collectors conveys much in a little, sets limits to its subject and keeps within them, and - saving grace - treats that subject with individuality as well as authority, in a style at once concise, forthright and witty. It is, in short, a masterpiece, whose merits are acknowledged by the fact that it has never, in forty years, been out of print." (Nicolas Barker in his introduction to the revised edition of the "ABC for Book Collectors", Oak Knoll Press 1995).
John Carter, ABC for Book Collectors
The ABC for Book Collectors is presented here, with our thanks, by permission of Bob Fleck, Oak Knoll Press.
Nicolas Barker about the ABC for Book Collectors
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Article

Prints as historical evidence: Lincoln’s deathbed

The assassination and death of Abraham Lincoln on April 14th and 15th, 1865 sent a shock throughout the nation, generating an intense desire by the American public to find out details about this tragedy. Printmakers, both for illustrated newspapers and for separately-issued prints, met this public interest with an outpouring of images. As there was no television nor internet at the time, and as there are few photographs of any of the events surrounding Lincoln's death, these prints provided the public at that time with their only visual assess to the assassination and its aftermath ...
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Charles Dickens’ Debt to Henry Fielding

When Charles Dickens' sixth son was born on January 16, 1849, the boy was named for one of Dickens' favorite authors. Supposedly Dickens had first thought to name the boy after Oliver Goldsmith, but he feared the child would be ridiculed as "Oliver always asking for more." Instead he named his son Henry Fielding Dickens, after legendary 18th-century author Henry Fielding. Though Dickens was born too late to meet Fielding, his predecessor had a profound impact on Dickens' work.
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Article

Collecting Baedeker Travel Guides

Baedeker's travel guides were the premium travel guides of the second half of the 19th and the first part of the 20th century, giving rise to the verse: "Kings and governments may err – but never Mr. Baedeker." They are keenly collected, and some of them are extremely rare, like the famous and seldom seen "Athen" Baedeker from 1896, which was not sold outside Greece.
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