Aller au contenu principal
Résultats: 46 - 54 / 76

articles

Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
1090_image1_doll.jpg
Bibliophilie

You don’t by any chance know the way through this labyrinth, do you?

Publié le 09 Mai 2013
Having thought about it though, it did occur to me that the real problem with that Treasure Detectives malarkey was not even the fact that they had no clue what they were on about … more the fact that to someone "normal" it would be really hard to tell. If I were wandering the earth all besotted with books and suddenly had a windfall from a mysterious Romanian Great Uncle I'd never previously heard of, and I wanted to start collecting books … how would I go about it? First … there are rules. They are for you, and like all of the best rules, they are rules that don't just apply to book collecting.
[…] En voir plus
1057_image1_btyw_thursday.jpg
Bibliophilie

How to Prevent Ghosting and Shadowing in Rare Books

Publié le 21 Mars 2013
When it comes to rare books, condition is everything. Any kind of damage, discoloration, or flaws can significantly impact a book's value. One of the most common flaws we see in rare and antiquarian books is a condition called ghosting or shadowing. This condition occurs when a page fades unevenly, leaving a visible outline on the page.
[…] En voir plus
1050_image1_ldcrime.jpg
Bibliophilie

Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction and The Private Library

Publié le 18 Mars 2013
One of the most popular components of a private library is the mystery genre, which comprises a vast array of sub-genres such as detective fiction. The genesis of the detective fiction sub-genre may be traced to a short story penned by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841 titled The Murders in the Rue Morgue. All the elements of what we today recognize as the essential characteristics of the sub-genre are found in this short story: a brutal murder; baffled police; an independent investigator that solves the case through superior intelligence, humbling the police in the process.
[…] En voir plus
967_image1_gg_lighthouse1.jpg
Bibliophilie

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Guiding Lights

Publié le 14 Déc. 2012
I've ranted before about lighthouses being one of those subject areas from which collectors have mysteriously vanished. People scrabbling and clawing in the most fearsome way for lighthouse literature and then one day, more or less out of the blue, they don't want any at all. Not even the rarest material. I suspect that in this case, eBay and print-on-demand technology killed the market. The field was largely information driven, and once people got access to cheap reprints or bargain copies of scarce texts, the game was over for dealers like me.
[…] En voir plus
811_image1_gibson_fire_1.jpg
Bibliophilie

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Why I Bothered

Publié le 22 Juin 2012
"If you keep an open mind in this business, you learn something new every day." Greg Gibson on collecting the unusual: "Fire insurance mapping began in London in the 1700s, but it had never been applied with a systematic approach. In 1867 Daniel Alfred Sanborn, a surveyor from Massachusetts, saw the need for such a service, and quickly occupied that niche. By the late 1800s he had offices spanning the continent, sending out thousands of surveyors to record the footprints and construction details of buildings in American cities. Insurance companies could then use this information to write accurate policies, based on potential fire risk as documented by Sanborn's company."
[…] En voir plus
784_image1_gentle_madness.jpg
Bibliophilie

A New Edition of A Gentle Madness - Catching up with Nick Basbanes

Publié le 08 Juin 2012
Ask any book collector about his favorite classic of collecting, and Nick Basbanes' Gentle Madness, first published in 1995, is undoubtedly at the top of the list. Now an updated edition of this book about the "Eternal Passion for Books" has been published. Rebecca Rego Barry asked Nick Basbanes about the book, how it affected his career, and what he's currently working on. Some snippets:
[…] En voir plus
778_image1_ld_wine_1.jpg
Bibliophilie

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - OenoLit and The Private Library

Publié le 24 Mai 2012
Given that the first book printed from moveable type in Western Europe, the Gutenberg Bible, contains numerous references to wine, and given that the technology for printing that first book may itself have been modeled upon the screw press used to extract wine from grapes, this writer has always found it puzzling that the cultivation, processing, distribution and consumption of wine is rarely a major thematic element in works of fiction.
[…] En voir plus
46 - 54 / 76

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

ILAB in the Press - Aus dem Antiquariat (German)

German antiquarian magazine, Aus dem Antiquariat, has covered ILAB's new Mentoring Programme.
The programme aims to help young or recently launched booksellers throughout the world by offering support and counsel on a one to one basis. The International Mentoring Programme, organised by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers gives experienced booksellers the opportunity to lend a hand in the early days of a bookseller's career when help is likely most needed. Four German speaking dealers have signed up as mentors so far: Norbert Donhofer and Robert Schoisengeier (both Vienna, Austria), Sabine Keune (Aachen) and Uwe Turszynski (Munich).
[…] En voir plus
Article

Votes for Women - The 53rd California International Antiquarian Book Fair

Thousands of book lovers, booksellers, and scholars will converge in Southern California for the 53rd California International Antiquarian Book Fair over the weekend of February 7-9, 2020.
[…] En voir plus
Booksellers

Emil Hirsch (1866-1954) – Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile –

The fifth part of the series of 25 booksellers’ biographies from Ernst Fischer’s biographical handbook "Verleger, Buchhändler & Antiquare aus Deutschland und Österreich in der Emigration nach 1933" is dedicated to Emil Hirsch, who started his career in Munich in the year 1884 as an apprentice at Ludwig Rosenthal’s antiquarian bookshop. After working with Oscar Gerschel in Stuttgart, Zahn & Jaensch in Dresden and, as partner, with Gottlob Hess in Munich, he founded his own company in 1879. Emil Hirsch’s antiquarian bookshop and auction house very soon became the centre of bibliophily in the Bavarian capital. He was a founding member of the Gesellschaft der Münchener Bücherfreunde, encouraged Hans von Weber to establish the „Hundertdrucke“ and supported the Bremer Presse. Famous collectors, authors and artists like Karl Wolfskehl and Franz Marc were amongst his friends.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Sales higher in bookshops with cafés

Sales higher in bookshops with cafés: This is the astonishing insight taken from a statistical analysis by the Booksellers' Association. What shall we make out of it? Antiquarian bookshops offering tea and coffee with (on) leather bindings? First editions with red wine? Japanese block books with sushi?
[…] En voir plus
Article

The International Book Fair - Amsterdam, October 5 - 9, 1965

"Dear Colleagues, We have the honour to give you herewith full details about the First International Antiquarian Bookfair. We cordially invite all members of national associations affiliated with the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers to take part in this manifestation." With these words Nico Israel and Bob de Graaf, Chairman and Secretary of the Dutch Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (NVvA) announced the first ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair. At the Ravenna Congress 1964 the Dutch proposal to organize a fair under the auspices of the League was unanimously carried. A year later, from October 5 to 9, 1965, ILAB dealers met at the Arti et Amicitiae in the centre of Amsterdam for their first joint fair in the history of the League. W. R. Fletcher was among the exhibitors.
[…] En voir plus
Article

From the Private Library's Archives: Extra-Illustrated Books and The Private Library

Any independent bookstore that has been in business for any length of time is likely to have squirreled away on its shelves a tome or two (or more) that is extra-illustrated. Such books are illustrated by means of engravings, variant title pages, and the like, which were not included in the book by the publisher, but added later. This additional matter may consist of original drawings, manuscripts, etc., but it may also consist of leaves taken from other books. The added material may be mounted, inlaid, or trimmed to conform to the size of the other leaves of the book. Also called "Grangerized" (a term derived from the vogue begun by the publication of James Granger's Biographical history of England, in 1769, in which Granger had blank leaves included so that the owner could insert desired illustrations).
[…] En voir plus
fermer la fenêtre