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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
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Bibliophilie

Book Collecting Basics - How to Identify First Editions by Grosset & Dunlap

Publié le 03 Mars 2015
Although publishers Grosset & Dunlap focused primarily on reprints, they did produce first editions. For book collectors, first edition identification is a vital skill. More often than not, conventions for distinguishing first editions vary from publishing house to publishing house. Take a moment to learn more about the history of Grosset & Dunlap and find out how to identify their first editions.
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Bibliophilie

Book Collecting Basics - A History of the Bastard Title

Publié le 10 Fév. 2015
At last, it is time to read your new book. It is a crisp evening and you have made a cup of your favorite tea. You splurged and even made a fire. You sink into your chair and look at the book's cover, tracing the title with your fingertip. You sip your tea and open to the first page. Blank. You turn the page. Nearly blank, except for the title - again. With some impatience, you turn to the next page. Here the title is presented a third time but with the welcome addition of the author and publisher. Your tea nearly finished, you quickly flip past the table of contents, list of illustrations, author's note, preface, introduction, and dedication. As your fire burns out, you reach page one. As any reader knows, a book can offer a vast amount of information before the "first" page. But why, one wonders, do some books display the title no less than three times in succession? None will dispute the cover: printing the title there seems obvious and right. Even the title page, listing the title, author, and publisher, passes with little argument. But why this in-between page, this unneeded repetition between the two? Why, in the words of old-fashioned bookbinders, this bastard title?
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Bibliophilie

„The Heart of Africa“ - Early Adventures and Expeditions. Second "Bibliophile Evening" at Dr. Paul Kainbacher Rare Books

Publié le 09 Fév. 2015
Baden (Vienna), 14th March, 2015 - a must for book collectors who are interested in rare and fine books on travel and expedition. Dr. Paul Kainbacher, Austrian bookseller and specialist on rare travel accounts, natural history and early photographies from exotic places, invites customers and colleague to a Bibliophile Evening dedicated to the history and exploration of the "heart of Africa".
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Bibliophilie

being a reader, again and still

Publié le 07 Jan. 2015
There's a story my parents used to tell of me as a child and how much I loved to read. Reading was what my family did in the evenings; we sat in the room we referred to as the study and read. One evening I was so deeply engrossed in my book that I had no idea they were talking to me; this was entertaining enough that they were both watching me to see how long it would be before I responded. It was long enough that it became a tale they told, part of how they understood who I was.
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Bibliophilie

David A. Williamson II

Publié le 10 Sept. 2014
Part two of our interview with David A. Williamson, one of the largest Stephen King collectors in the world. In 2009, he bought Betts Books and one of his greatest joys is helping other King collectors find that “special” collectible for their own collections. He lives in Fairfield, CT, is married and has three children.
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Bibliophilie

Collector Spotlight: Acquiring an Authoritative Stephen King Collection

Publié le 10 Sept. 2014
David A. Williamson began collecting Stephen King novels and memorabilia in the 1980s and has amassed a collection that ranks as one of the largest in the world. In 2009, he bought Betts Books and one of his greatest joys is helping other King collectors find that "special" collectible for their own collections. He lives in Fairfield, CT, is married and has three children. He has generously shared his collecting experience and expertise with Books Tell You Why in the following interview.
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Bibliophilie

David A. Williamson

Publié le 10 Sept. 2014
David A. Williamson began collecting Stephen King novels and memorabilia in the 1980s and has amassed a collection that ranks as one of the largest in the world. In 2009, he bought Betts Books and one of his greatest joys is helping other King collectors find that “special” collectible for their own collections. He lives in Fairfield, CT, is married and has three children. He has generously shared his collecting experience and expertise with Books Tell You Why in the following interview.
[…] En voir plus
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Bibliophilie

Larry McMurtry, a Collected Book Collector

Publié le 12 Juin 2014
Although renowned as a novelist and screenwriter, Pulitzer Prize-winner Larry McMurtry is above all a passionate book collector. A bookseller for over fifty years, McMurtry began writing as a way to fund his book purchases. He has acquired quite a few - his own personal collection contains over thirty thousand volumes and his bookstore holds another 200,000. He says, "The tradition I was born into was essentially nomadic, a herdsmen tradition, following animals across the earth. The bookshops are a form of ranching; instead of herding cattle, I herd books."
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28 - 36 / 76

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Poe and Rafinesque in Philadelphia

It is not often that one discovers the work of an overlooked or forgotten genius, or a previously-unknown work of an established master. This is, of course, the hope which moves us to carefully examine all sorts of periodical publications and ephemera. So when Tom Congalton asked me to catalog two large folio volumes of the Philadelphia-based Saturday Evening Post, from 1827 and 1828, I was pleased to find the puzzle poem "Enigma" attributed to Edgar Allan Poe, and "Psalm 139th" by his brother Henry Poe. Perhaps the most interesting contributions to these volumes are not the Poeiana, but rather a whole series of botanical sketches and other contributions by an eccentric genius with the evocative name Rafinesque.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Erik Kiviat, William Wantling and the Ecosystem of the Mimeo Revolution

An example of bare bones mimeo, Head First struck me as presenting Wantling in his natural habitat; for Wantling, like Blazek and Bukowski, is the epitome of a Mimeo Revolution poet. Yet strangely, none of Kiviat's mags are featured in Secret Location. Neither is Blazek's Ole nor Bukowski's Laugh Literary. See a pattern here? It is high time to build on and tear down the foundations of Clay and Phillips' classic text. Documenting Midwest and blue collar mimeo would be a good start. A couple of posts down the line will complicate Wantling's image as a mimeo outlaw a little bit, but the Mimeo Revolution is all about myth and perception, so I think it is safe to say here that Wantling is most commonly viewed as an outlaw poet, who made his home in the land of the Gestetner.
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Article

The Summer of Love - Magazine as Seismograph

It is fitting that the first issue of San Francisco Earthquake was published in the fall of 1967 as it is a product of the hangover after the Summer of Love. That Summer was largely a media fabrication and the Earthquake through its five issues is a Burroughsian attack on Time-Life media and a potent example of Fluxus and Situationist detournment. But let's be honest, even the mainstream media reported that the flower in the hair of wannabe hippies had wilted by 1967. For example, Joan Didion's articles on Lifestyles in the Golden Land had been appearing in the Saturday Evening Post as early as 1965.
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Article

Talks and Tours at Chelsea Antiquarian Book Fair – November 1-2, 2013

Over its life, the Chelsea Antiquarian Book Fair has become a fixture in the November calendar for book collectors and dealers from Britain, Europe and America. Warmer than Boston, more intimate than York, less formal than Paris – Chelsea has it all. Dealer and collectors love the fair: it's friendly and varied, the dealers have time to talk, there are plenty of books but it's not overwhelming. 'See you at Chelsea' has become a phrase familiar to everyone in the British rare book trade. This year's Fair will offer visitors an excellent opportunity to find the perfect antiquarian book among thousands brought to the Chelsea Old Town Hall from 1st to 2nd November. Besides the exquisite, extraordinary and unique items showcased by the 82 expert booksellers from the United Kingdom and abroad, book lovers will enjoy an amazing number of book-related talks and tours throughout the weekend.
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Article

Practice Makes (Nearly) Perfect - 36th Annual Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair

Sometimes the years seem to fly by like calendar leaves flapping off the wall in a corny movie. That was much the feeling at this year's 36th Annual Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair, held at the Hynes Convention Center. Old veterans of Bostons past walked the familiar aisles, nodding at one another – "Here we are again." Members of the excellent Brede staff, many of whom have been working with us for years, gave us a "Good to see you again" shoulder clap. And they meant it. We'd each survived another year and were back in the familiar, comfortable confines of the Hynes. I recall problems in the early years, mostly centering around the difficulties of moving in and out. But now staff and exhibitors alike know the drill, and if anyone unfamiliar with the procedure gets panicky, there are plenty of calmer heads to offer support. No more ugly, non-conforming booths, no fighting, no biting. The complainers will never go away, but even they seemed subdued this year.
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Article

Rubens in Stuttgart

There are many books with a Rubens design. Even in books from the 19th century we find frontispieces copied from a Rubens design which was often simply reproduced and thus many editions were adorned with a Rubens.
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