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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
 
Les Enluminures Podcast
Bibliophilie

PODCAST "The Collector and the Dealer"

Publié le 29 Nov. 2019
Sandra Hindman is owner and founder of "Les Enluminures" with galleries in Chicago, Paris and New York specialising in manuscripts and miniatures from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the gallery also handles rings and jewelry from the same periods. In this podcast Sandra has invited collector Benjamin Zucker and looks at their roles and relationship as dealer and collector. While this podcast focusses on the current "Diamonds" exhibition, it also reveals the fascination to collect, the handling of manuscripts and the knowledge needed to deal in historical items.
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Jessica Jordan
Bibliophilie

Five Young Women With Prize-Winning Book Collections

Publié le 11 Sept. 2018
The Paris Review, 7th September 2018: In 2017, Honey & Wax Booksellers established an annual prize for American women book collectors, aged 30 years and younger. The idea took shape when Heather O’Donnell and Rebecca Romney, the bookstore’s owners, observed that “the women who regularly buy books from us are less likely to call themselves 'collectors' than the men, even when those women have spent years passionately collecting books."
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

ABA Members on Postage Stamps (No. 1 in a very short series)

"Peter J. Kroger, of Ruislip, was not an ABA member for very long: the minutes of the General Committee say no more than '(October 1960) (Removed from membership April 1961)'. He and his wife Helen ran a modest catalogue business from their bungalow, 45 Cranley Drive, between 1954 and 7 January 1961, when a visit from Superintendent George `Moonraker' Smith, of Scotland Yard, put an abrupt end to their bookselling - and other - activities." The spy who loved books - An amazing story told by Angus O'Neill as "no. 1 in a very short series".
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Article

Art and the World's First Novel

What is generally acknowledged as the world's first novel was written by a Japanese woman a thousand years ago. The Tale of Genji, by Murakasi Shikibu (known as Lady Murakasi in the West), is regarded to be an accurate description of life in the imperial court in the Heian era (794 - 1185 CE). The daughter of a scholar and an officer of the court, she was given a male's education. Being a lady-in-waiting herself, she was privy to life at court.
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Article

Attention Bibliophiles: World’s Largest Rare Book Fair Returns to San Francisco

Thousands of book lovers, buyers, browsers and sellers will come together in San Francisco at the 44th California International Antiquarian Book Fair from February 11 through Sunday, February 13. With collections and rare treasures offered by more than 200 booksellers from the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), the world's largest rare book fair is a bibliophile's delight, featuring a rich selection of books, manuscripts, maps and other printed materials, including incunabula, fine bindings, first editions, children's and illustrated books, ephemera, and antiquarian books on all subject areas one can conceivably imagine.
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Article

Professional Education of Antiquarian Booksellers in Russia

Unlike most European countries, where the professional associations of antique book dealers play the role of the educational centers in the field of antiquarian book trade, in Russia, which hasn't had such organizations until now, another practice has formed. The educational centre for the specialists in the field of book trade as a whole and the antiquarian book trade in particularly is the institution of higher education - Moscow State University of Printing Arts (MGUP, until 1993 the Moscow Institute of Printing) ...
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Famous Literary Hoaxes (Part Two)

Back in 400 BCE, Dionysus the Renegade was a Stoic philosopher and student of Zeno of Citium. He wanted to humiliate his rival Heraclides and decided to forge a work of Sophocles. Dionysus inserted the acrostic "Heraclides is ignorant of letters," which quickly led to the discovery of Dionysus' fraud - but not before he'd achieved his aim of embarrassing Heraclides. Since then, the literary hoax has played a fascinating and engaging role in history. In Part One, we focused on the Ossian poems, The English Mercurie, and Thomas Chatterton's Rowley poems. Now, delve into William Ireland's spurious Shakespeare, Davy Crockett's attempts to combat false autobiographies, and more.
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