Aller au contenu principal
Résultats: 1 - 8 / 108

articles

Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
1883_image1_btyw_sebald0.jpg
Littérature

Collecting - Postwar Germany in the Works of W.G. Sebald

Publié le 15 Août 2016
Whose role is it to write postwar German fiction? Since World War II ended, numerous writers of great acclaim have come out of West Germany and the GDR, and later from reunified Germany. For instance, you might be familiar with the works of the West German novelists Heinrich Böll and Günter Grass, or with the GDR literature of Christa Wolf. While many writers of the immediate postwar period returned to the rise of Nazi Germany and its aftermath in their works, W.G. Sebald is a bit of an interesting case.
[…] En voir plus
1879_image1_btyw_thurber1.jpg
Littérature

Collecting - Ten Facts About Caldecott Winner, James Thurber

Publié le 05 Août 2016
James Thurber was a short story writer, cartoonist, and humorist. Much of his work was published in The New Yorker, where he began working as an editor in 1927. His most famous short story is The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, recently adapted to film. Combining his talents for writing and illustration, Thurber had a successful career writing children's books, and won the Caldecott Medal for the book Many Moons. Below, read ten facts about Thurber's fascinating life and career.
[…] En voir plus
1874_image1_sb_fl0.jpeg
Littérature

‘I never have any luck with my books’ – Collecting the works of Friedo Lampe

Publié le 21 Juil. 2016
Lampe was born on 4 December 1899, in the northern city of Bremen, a place which would exert a particular influence on his writing. At the age of five, he was diagnosed with bone tuberculosis in his left ankle and was sent to a children's clinic over 100 miles away, on the East Frisian island of Nordeney; he spent a total of three years there, away from his family, before being pronounced cured, but it left him disabled for the rest of his life. As a teenager, Lampe was a voracious reader (E.T.A. Hoffmann, Kleist, Büchner, Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Boccaccio, Cervantes, Dostoevsky, Shakespeare, Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe) and an insatiable book buyer: 'It really is an illness with me. I just have to buy every book, even if I don't have the money.'
[…] En voir plus
1873_image1_vic_doyle1.png
Littérature

Collecting - The Life of the Great Creator of Sherlock Holmes

Publié le 21 Juil. 2016
On the 7th of July, 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle died at age 71 from a heart attack. On this the 86th anniversary of his death, we'd like to look at this famous author, spiritualist & physician and his lifetime contribution to so many different fields! Conan Doyle (as he is often called, though Conan Doyle is a combination of his middle and last names, as Conan is not a surname, as people often think!) was not born under auspicious circumstances. His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was an alcoholic and when Arthur was only 5 years old he and his siblings were dispersed to live with family and friends across Edinburgh. A few years later the family moved back together and for numerous years lived in near-poverty. Luckily, Doyle had wealthy family to support him and to send him to Jesuit boarding school in England for seven years beginning when he was nine years old. Despite a difficult home life and upbringing, Doyle apparently struggled leaving home for school – as he was incredibly close with his mother (and would remain so throughout his life) and cherished the stories she would tell him during his childhood. It is even said that his favorite part of school was writing letters home to his mother, and telling stories to his schoolmates that she had once told him!
[…] En voir plus
1863_image1_beattie_poe.jpg
Littérature

Collecting - The Russian taste for Edgar Allan Poe

Publié le 14 Juin 2016
'"Edgar Poe - the underground stream in Russia." So the Russian Symbolist poet Aleksandr Blok noted in his journal for November 6, 1911, a topic for a future critical study. The article was never written, but the prospect has remained an enticing one. For Poe's fame, however clouded by conflicting interpretation, is of long standing in Russia' (Joan Delaney Grossman, Edgar Allan Poe in Russia: a study in legend and literary influence, p. 7).
[…] En voir plus
1811_image1_adrian_doyle1.png
Littérature

Collecting – Arthur Conan Doyle: Social Justice Warrior

Publié le 07 Mars 2016
Arthur Conan Doyle was hardly a meek man, nor one prone to seeking diplomatic solutions when dramatic alternatives were available. When he attempted to enlist in the military forces he wrote that "I am fifty-five but I am very strong and hardy, and can make my voice audible at great distances, which is useful at drill." This audible voice proved to be very significant for two individuals in particular; George Edalji and Oscar Slater. My interest in these two men was sparked by our recent celebration of "Arthur Conan Doyle Week" at the end of May in honour of his birthday. Fortunately or otherwise, the Olympia bookfair has prevented me from typing up some of the more fascinating aspects of Doyle's life that I discovered during that week.
[…] En voir plus

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

AbeBooks' Video Trip to the London International Antiquarian Book Fair at Olympia

AbeBooks published a video of their trip to London's International Antiquarian Book Fair at Olympia in June 2011. Among many other highlights you see the extraordinarily rare press copy of James Joyce's Ulysses, offered by Peter Harrington Rare Books.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Over-Pursuing: On Paying Too Much For Books

It happens. You miscalculate scarcity or demand. Or a widow asks you, tears in her eyes, "Is that all?" A dealer charms you with a book's virtues. Or assures you "The only one on the internet right now." You get overexcited at an auction. Or you drool over some choice item at a book fair. Could be as simple as waiting too long to catalogue an acquisition. But no matter the cause, if you are a book dealer sooner or later: you will overpay for stock.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Why California Isn’t Called “Nova Albion”

On June 17, 1579, Francis Drake claimed California for England. He anchored his ship, the Golden Hind, just north of present-day San Francisco and named the new territory "Nova Albion." But despite Drake's claim in the name of Queen Elizabeth I, he was not the first European to explore California.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Prevention and Suppression of Theft of Works of Art

At an international level: The ART LOSS REGISTER, which establishes a worldwide list of stolen works of art, in collaboration with museums, auction houses, national and international police (Interpol), insurance companies, brokers and individuals (including antique dealers), in the hope that the access to the register will stop the sale of stolen goods, help their restitution, and allow the arrest of thieves and receivers. Which works of art can be registered?
[…] En voir plus
Article

Bibliographies - World Literature

Online: Fidel Fajardo-Acosta's World Literature - Author Anniversaries
[…] En voir plus
fermer la fenêtre