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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
Bibliothèques

ILAB Congress visits newly opened William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, L.A.

Publié le 30 Jan. 2018
UCLA's William Andrews Clarke Memorial Library, renowned for its collection of rare books and manuscripts from England’s Tudor period through the 18th century, including the world’s largest repository of materials related to Oscar Wilde, has just reopened after extensive renovations. Participants of the upcoming ILAB congress, will visit the library as part of the extensive congress programme.
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Bibliothèques

"In Good Order But Poor Condition" - ILAB Patron of Honour Dr. Michael Knoche in F.A.Z.

Publié le 02 Août 2017
The former director of the Anna Amalia Library in Weimar and ILAB Patron of Honour recently wrote in the Frankfurter Allgemeine newspaper about digitisation, book restoration and the state of Germany's libraries. "In Good Order But Poor Condition" is an interesting read about the importance of digitisation, but also about the need for research material not only to be available in digitised format.
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Bibliothèques

Maps and the 20th Century : Drawing the Line

Publié le 24 Jan. 2017
For some reason, I didn't get my customary invitation to the press preview of the latest British Library exhibition, "Maps and the 20th Century : Drawing the Line", when it opened towards the last year – perhaps it was something I said. No matter, it's still on for another six weeks or so – and I finally found some time to visit it a few days ago. I found it challenging, which is a good thing.
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Bibliothèques

Radio Feature - Bayrische Regionalbibliotheken - in German language

Publié le 09 Jan. 2017
Bayerns Bibliotheken sind weit mehr als nur Aufbewahrungsorte für Bücher. Sie sind geistige Tankstellen und gleichzeitig Orte der Begegnung. Darüber hinaus hat jede einzelne von ihnen neben ihrer ganz eigenen Geschichte unterhaltsame und spannende Geschichten zu erzählen, denen Birgit Fürst in ihrem einstündigen Zeit-für-Bayern-Feature nachspürt, das am 2. Weihnachtsfeiertag 2016 auf Bayern 2 ausgestrahlt wurde. Gleich zu Beginn der Sendung nimmt der Fotograf der Staatsbibliothek Bamberg, Gerald Raab, die Hörer mit in die Keller der Bibliothek, wo er wertvollste Handschriften digitalisiert. Direktorin Bettina Wagner lässt später die Büchersammlung des wittelsbachischen Herzogs Karl II. August von Pfalz-Zweibrücken in all ihrer Pracht vor dem geistigen Auge des Zuhörers erstehen. Schließlich erlebt der Hörer staunend, welch hohe Präzision und große Geduld Buchbinderin Regine Ullein beim Restaurieren alte Karten aufbringt.
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Bibliothèques

Book It: Five of the Most Interesting U.S. Libraries

Publié le 01 Nov. 2016
Let's face it: Visiting a library while traveling to a new city is not always atop everyone's must-do list. Even for the most bookish or literary-minded traveler, libraries as destinations often get lost in the fray when whipping up itineraries or sightseeing spots. Museums. Parks. Skyscrapers. Food markets. Sporting events. These activities more times than not reign supreme over buildings of archaic texts and decaying books where most travelers feel 'You've seen one library, you've seen them all.'But there are a number of libraries across the country that not only warrant serious investigation but also reward visitors with insight into our nation's history and heritage.
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Rare Books School 2013 – Part 2

Off to Cecil Court with the Modern First Editions group from London Rare Books School. An excellent afternoon. Highlight for me was Ron Chapman (Tindley & Chapman) pretending to think that Angus O'Neill (Omega Bookshop) was a student on the course and had he learnt anything – but an afternoon full of wider interest too. Glimpses of a couple of very high-powered booksellers in earnest conversations – a feeling of vultures circling over something special that might have just turned up. We never got to find out what it may have been, but the booksellers of the Court really put themselves out to show off some treasures and to answer everyone's questions.
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Article

“Gelos” – Rare Book Auctions in Russia

Gelos was established in Moscow in 1988 and is renowned for being the leading Fine Art and Antiquities auctioneers throughout Russia, with offices throughout Europe in Paris, Madrid, Vienna, Prague, Riga, Warsaw and, recently opened, in London (Knightsbridge). It is the largest auction house in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The company carries out appraisals and makes expert examinations, holds auction sales, sells antiquities from its galleries and salons, forms private and corporate collections. Selling at auctions is generally practised and widely spread in the West. On the Russian market Gelos' activities are innovative. A report by Alena Lavrenova.
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Article

The History of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (A.B.A.) Part 1

This short survey of the British ANTIQUARIAN BOOKSELLERS' ASSOCIATION consists of the account of its first half-century prepared by Dudley Massey for the fiftieth anniversary in 1956 (slightly revised) with a continuation to the present year by Martin Hamlyn. It was published in the ILAB Newsletter 36.
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Booksellers

Herman H. J. Lynge & Søn – The First Antiquarian Bookshop in Scandinavia

Herman Henrik Julius Lynge (November 13, 1822 - May 12, 1897) was a Danish antiquarian bookseller. He continued and owned the first antiquarian bookshop in Scandinavia, now "Herman H. J. Lynge & Søn A/S". Lynge was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, as the son of a bookbinder. At a very young age, before he was even confirmed, he began his apprenticeship as a bookseller, and the shop in which he took his education was carefully chosen by his father, Henrik Berndt Lynge. His master was Christian Tønder Sæbye (1789-1844), who had started his bookshop, initially a second-hand shop focusing on books, in 1821 on Gothersgade 26. After his apprenticeship, Lynge continued to work in the company, and when Sæbye died in 1844, the young man, only aged twenty-two, took over as manager of the bookshop, which was still owned by the Sæbye family. In 1853 Lynge was able to buy the shop from the family at the price of 1,000 rix-dollars, and at the same time he took out a trade licence as a bookseller. In the first years the cholera was harrying Copenhagen, and Lynge is said to have done great business at the time due to the large number of private libraries offered for sale; he was the only proper "antiquarian bookseller" in Denmark, and he often spited the danger of infection and personally collected the large number of books in the homes of the ill.
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