Aller au contenu principal
Résultats: 1 - 8 / 27

articles

Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
1749_image1_perkamentus_seren1.jpg
Book Binding

Collecting - Serendipity and The Private Library

Publié le 27 Nov. 2015
I visited a little antiquarian shop in Weesp (not far from Amsterdam) to do a little browsing. After half an hour I was done and ready to leave. I was taking a last look at the shop's shelf of House of Orange books (books about the Dutch Royal House) when my eye was drawn to a book with an interesting but untitled spine. The book turned out to be a catalog of an exhibition of portraits and objects relating to the House of Orange-Nassau on the occasion of the inauguration of Her Majesty Queen Wilhelmina (1898).
[…] En voir plus
1679_image1_minsky_amelia1.jpg
Book Binding

American Publishers' Bindings on the Books of Amelia E. Barr 1882-1918

Publié le 11 Sept. 2015
Today hardly anybody knows the name Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, yet a hundred years ago she was among the most prolific and popular women writing in America. If it were not for the decorated bindings on her books I would not have known she existed. Some of the best cover artists were assigned to her works, including Thomas Watson Ball, Alice Cordelia Morse, Evelyn W. Clark, Blanche McManus Mansfield, Amy Richards, William Snelling Hadaway, Harry B. Matthews, Theodore Brown Hapgood and the Decorative Designers.
[…] En voir plus
1678_image1_norbertmorgenstern.jpg
Book Binding

23 Wiener Werkstätte Bindings for Max Morgenstern – On Show in Vienna, until October 2015

Publié le 09 Sept. 2015
In January 2015 Norbert Donhofer presented an extraordinary gathering of bibliophile treasures documented in a richly illustrated catalogue. The second part of this amazing collection will now be on display at the Grillparzerhaus in Vienna from 24 September to 9 October 2015. Max Morgenstern was one of the best customers of the Wiener Werkstätte. The Jewish collector belonged to a generation of Viennese bibliophiles who founded libraries with great knowledge, ultimate taste and a life-long passion. The precious bindings of the Morgenstern Collection, now on show at the Grillparzerhaus in Vienna, are a shining example of the outstanding artworks created during the Viennese Belle Epoque.
[…] En voir plus
1633_image1_minsky_peggy1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Covers - A Previously Unknown Amy M. Sacker Cover

Publié le 03 Juin 2015
One exciting find was Amy M. Sacker's design on Sweet Peggy by Linnie S. Harris [Little, Brown & Company, 1904]. Like many of their rebound books, the replacement endpapers are acidic, have turned brown and are disintegrating, but this does not affect the cover art. Considering the amount of use this volume must have had, the design remains bright on the cover and spine, with just a few smudges that can be cleaned. What's exciting about it? It's not just that it's a good cover design by an important artist, and one that adopts Thomas Watson Ball's style of clouds. This is a rare book.
[…] En voir plus
1502_image1_minsky_fred1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Cover - Frederick W. Gookin

Publié le 20 Nov. 2014
When trying to learn more about F. W. Gookin, the first few biographical notes I found did not even mention his work as a book cover designer. I thought, "Maybe this Frederick William Gookin (1853–1936) is the wrong one." He was the Buckingham Curator of Japanese Prints at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he is described as "a lifelong Chicagoan."
[…] En voir plus
1461_image1_minsky_ball_1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Covers - Ball Covers Identified by Lee Thayer

Publié le 06 Oct. 2014
In 1970 Charles Gullans and John Espey conducted two interviews with Emma Redington Lee Thayer (1874–1973), co-founder (with Henry Thayer) of Decorative Designers, the New York firm that created thousands of book cover designs. The firm was started about 1895 by Henry, Emma joined him the following year, they married in 1909, were divorced in 1932 and DD closed. In 1919 Lee Thayer, as she then called herself, published her first mystery novel, which was followed by another 60, the last issued in 1966.
[…] En voir plus

Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Rare Booksellers' First Catalogues

Booksellers' firsts are as rare as some rare books. Often printed and produced with much love and energy, yet on cheap paper and for a still small company of customers, they are "used" – and thrown away. Who started when? What did he or she offer? And for what price? Only the first catalogues can answer such questions. How did he or she present the material? With illustrations, elaborate descriptions, old-fashioned, modern, sophisticated or funny? A fine selection of 100 titles, or the abundance of 4000 items in one volume? In form of a "real" print catalogue or as a photocopied list? The catalogues, and especially their covers, reflect the taste and customs of the decades in which they were printed. Some months ago Tom Congalton of Between the Covers Rare Books started to publish pictures of rare booksellers' first catalogues on Facebook. The most outstanding examples are presented here.
[…] En voir plus
Booksellers

The President on Safari - Dublin’s Fair City

Laurence Worms, President of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (ABA), promised the ABA members that he would travel around the British Isles to see as many of his colleagues as possible. He publishes his travel accounts in his blog "The President on Safari". This is Laurence Worms' report about the legendary Irish hospitality and a very special trip to Dublin.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Why The New York Antiquarian Book Fair Matters – To You, Me, and Everyone We Know

I didn't take any pictures at the New York Book Fair this year. I'm not much of a picture taker in the most relaxed of times, but at any given book event I can usually be counted on to snap a shot or two of my favorite booksellers in action; another few of my booth (mostly to remind me how I want – or don't want – the booth to look next year); and another batch recording my after-hours activities, which generally involve intemperate helpings of food and drink at the sorts of restaurants which, though generally above my pay grade, seem suddenly (alas, illusorily) within reach after a day spent selling high-priced rarities. But in New York I never had the chance, or even the inclination, to take any of my customary photos, despite the fact that I'm toting a spanking-new iPhone with what's reputed to be the best built-in digicam on any phone anywhere. (Well, okay, I did take one accidental snapshot of my left shoe while fumbling around looking for an old picture to show a customer…but that was it). No friends, no booth, no food – nothing. Why? you ask. Well, call me paradoxical, but the reason is simple and clear: the New York Book Fair is too important to be photographed.
[…] En voir plus
Article

The First Folio Thief found dead in his cell

Raymond Scott was sentenced to eight years in prison, because he had stolen a first folio edition of William Shakespeare's works from Durham University in 1998. On Wednesday he was found dead in his cell in Northumberland prison.
[…] En voir plus
Article

La Bibliophilie in France - Part 1 of 3 & The ILAB Breslauer Prize For Bibliography

In time with the Paris International Antiquarian Book Fair 2018, we would like to present some outstanding French publications that were submitted for the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography 2018.
[…] En voir plus
Article

Look What I Found at BTC: The Sign of the Cross

I like film souvenir books well enough, but with a few exceptions it's a little hard to get truly excited about them. De Mille's 1932 film, based on the play by Wilson Barrett, has a backstory about Charles Laughton as the Emperor Nero. Nero blames the Christians for burning Rome, and decides to put them all to death, as one is occasionally wont to do. There's also a love story between Frederic March as Rome's highest-ranking military officer, Marcus Superbus (really? Superbus? Why not "Marcus Gas Guzzling SUV"?) and Elissa Landi as Mercia, a cute Christian chick. You can see where complications might ensue.
[…] En voir plus
fermer la fenêtre