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Tout ce que vous devez savoir sur les livres rares et le commerce des livres anciens
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LILA

Histoire de la LILA

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
Aujourd’hui, la Ligue Internationale de la Librairie Ancienne rassemble 22 associations sous un toit. Certaines d’entre elles existaient préalablement à la fondation de la Ligue en 1947/48.  Cinq d’entre elles en furent le moteur : les associations de la librairie ancienne de Grande Bretagne, de France, du Danemark, de la Suède et des Pays-Bas.
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LILA

Conférence préliminaire

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
En 1947, des représentants de Grande-Bretagne, France, Danemark, Suède et des Pays-Bas se réunirent à Amsterdam pour une conférence préliminaire. Ils discutèrent de l’idée de Hertzberger de former une organisation qui contrecarrerait l’animosité et les méfiances engendrées par la Seconde Guerre Mondiale. La nouvelle Ligue Internationale de la Librairie Ancienne devrait susciter des liens d’amitié et de compréhension entre les nations afin de jeter les bases d’un marché professionnel plus juste.
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LILA

Copenhague 1948

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
La LILA fut officiellement incorporée à Copenhague en Septembre 1948 avec 10 pays fondateurs. Des délégués de Belgique, Finlande, Suisse et Italie rejoignirent leurs confrères de Grande-Bretagne, France, Suède, Danemark et des Pays-Bas autour de la table de réunion. La Norvège avait donné procuration au Danemark.
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LILA

1949-1950 - Les premières années

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
Pendant les premières années, les réunions du comité eurent lieu en Suisse, la plupart du temps dans les locaux du président. L’autorité de William Kundig était légendaire, ainsi que sa générosité, quand les décisions étaient finalement prises.
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LILA

1951-1960 Code de déontologie

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
Après la retraite de Muir, l’auteur de « Printing and the Mind of Man » fut unanimement élu président d’honneur à vie, ainsi qu’André Poursin. Quant à Menno Hertzberger, il fut honoré en qualité de père fondateur par acclamation lors de la conférence de Genève en 1952.
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LILA

1961-1970

Publié le 17 Juil. 2013
L’admission du Japon, la création du Prix de bibliographie (désormais intitulé Prix de Bibliographie LILA-Breslauer) et la première foire internationale du livre ancien furent les étapes importantes des années soixante.
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Mémoire du passé

Une sélection de nos archives

Article

Agatha Christie: Unrivaled, Record-Breaking Crime Novelist… And One of My Favorite Authors (Hence this Blog)

Murder on the Orient Express. And Then There Were None. Murder at the Vicarage. The Body in the Library. A Murder is Announced. By the Pricking of My Thumbs. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. 4.50 From Paddington. What do all of these titles have in common? Besides great plots, inventive narratives and extremely competent character development? They were all written by the "Queen of Crime", Dame Agatha Christie. Christie is said to be the best-selling novelist of all time (according to the Guinness Book of World Records) with over 2 billion copies of her novels sold and having been translated into 103 different languages. Reputedly, Christie is the third most popular author of all time, with regard to sales figures, finishing behind just William Shakespeare and the Bible. Furthermore, Christie's stage-play "The Mousetrap" is the longest running (straight-play) stage production of all time, having opened in London in November 1952 and still being performed, with over 25,000 performances to date. How did this lady crime-novelist get to be so popular? How did her (seemingly average) life influence her writing? And perhaps the most important question of all… Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?!? (Just kidding, no spoiler alerts necessary). Stay tuned.
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Article

“Knowledge Comes, but Wisdom Lingers”: An Inside Look at One of the Most Quoted Writers of All Time

In August of 1809, a boy was born in Lincolnshire, England, who would go on to become one of Britain's best loved poets. This boy was talented as a writer early on, and together with two of his brothers published a local book of poetry by the time he had turned 17. His family grew up rather close, and though he enrolled in Trinity College, Cambridge in 1827, he was forced to drop out before getting his degree and return home when his father passed away four years later. Do you know who it is yet? Some of you may have guessed, given the title quote of this blog. Once dropping out of Cambridge, Alfred Tennyson spent the next few years of his life taking care of his family. His second book of poetry, published in 1833, was met with quite a large amount of criticism from readers – despite it having the masterpiece "The Lady of Shalott" in it! Unfortunately Tennyson was not able to take the criticism in stride, and was put off of publishing again for a decade. Though not much time was spent above on detailing Tennyson's rather homely and happy childhood, it should be noted, due to the fact that it helped inspire much of his creative writing, that within this decade he experienced quite a few hardships – his close friend (and soon to be brother-in-law) Arthur Hallam died suddenly. Not only did his death shake the core of the family, but they then moved to Essex where they lost a large portion of their fortune in a bad investment. Tennyson moved to London, and lived modestly while continuing to write poetry.
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Article

The International Book Fair - Amsterdam, October 5 - 9, 1965

"Dear Colleagues, We have the honour to give you herewith full details about the First International Antiquarian Bookfair. We cordially invite all members of national associations affiliated with the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers to take part in this manifestation." With these words Nico Israel and Bob de Graaf, Chairman and Secretary of the Dutch Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (NVvA) announced the first ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair. At the Ravenna Congress 1964 the Dutch proposal to organize a fair under the auspices of the League was unanimously carried. A year later, from October 5 to 9, 1965, ILAB dealers met at the Arti et Amicitiae in the centre of Amsterdam for their first joint fair in the history of the League. W. R. Fletcher was among the exhibitors.
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Article

Books about Books: A History of Oak Knoll Press, Part 1: A Life-Changing Decision

Thirty years ago I made the life-changing decision that I should try my hand in the world of publishing. Was I breaking new ground in the antiquarian bookselling business? Hardly! Any of you who have read the history of bookselling know that the professions of bookseller and publisher have been intertwined for centuries with large out-of-print booksellers often having equally large publishing programs. This method of doing business has all but died out today. The following experiment in biography will tell you the story of how our company has tried to resurrect it.
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Article

English Literary Manuscripts

Among manuscript collectors in the English-speaking world, literature has had the most constant appeal; and until recently, when historical manuscripts have really come into their own, literary ones attracted most of the highest prices for post-mediaeval manuscripts. This appeal is due to the universal interest in literature itself; to the demands of doctoral dissertations; to the desire among some individuals, librarians, and editors for definitive collections; and no doubt also to the relative ease, in comparison with historical manuscripts, of selecting an area for collection.
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