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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

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A Bookseller’s Adventure in Europe: Part 2

Had to get to Budapest in time for a Committee cocktail hour and dinner with the Hungarians and found that plane travel from Amsterdam directly to Budapest one way cost over $900. I kept waiting for a cheap flight to open up but the cheap airline serving Budapest went bankrupt the week before I made reservations. I finally flew LOT airlines, which is the main Polish carrier. I was served up many a joke by my friends about my chances of arrival in Budapest but they were all totally wrong. The flight to Warsaw and then on to Budapest went without a hitch. We were warned to be very careful taking the taxi from the airport to the hotel and only sign up with legitimate taxis. (This reminded me of Prague.) I found the right one who charged me in the Hungarian currency of Forint (they are part of the Euro zone but have not adopted the Euro). We met that evening with the Hungarian booksellers' association for a "let's get acquainted" dinner and had a welcome speech from Adam Bosze, their President, in perfect English and a passionate speech by the dean of Hungarian booksellers, Lajos Borda, in Hungarian. It was a very pleasant beginning.
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Middle Temple Crimes - British Booksellers Pop Up at Middle Temple on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day

When I first wrote about a World Rare Book Day on the blog only last September (see the post of that title) it was an idea still in the making. The charity tie-in with UNESCO was hoped for but not confirmed. Most of the events not even thought of. I am just absolutely thrilled that it has all come together so successfully. Huge congratulations to all concerned, especially my good friends Norbert Donhofer, Sally Burdon and Barbara van Benthem – you can see the full extent of what they have achieved on the official blog at http://ilabpopupbookfairs.blogspot.co.uk/ ... What a day it is going to be. It is all turning out just as imagined, kicking off with a Shakespeare first folio on display in Sydney. An antiquarian book plaza in Tokyo. Events as far afield as Cape Town and Moscow – Zurich, Vienna, Budapest, Milan, Munich, Paris, Antwerp, Copenhagen and elsewhere – books on a barge in Amsterdam, books at Haarlem Central railway station, a pop-up of pop-ups in Sweden, a fair at the Middle Temple Library here in London, and then across the Atlantic to New York, Chicago, Washington, Delaware and Seattle – and ending up, as good booksellers everywhere always do, in the pub. This one in Portland, Oregon.
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Booksellers

Kay and Muriel Craddock - 50 Years in Business

Congratulations to Kay Craddock and her mother Muriel Craddock who are celebrating 50 years in the rare book trade. "Immersed in the familiar hallmarks of "antique" and surrounded by up to 15,000 books, antiquarian bookseller Kay Craddock declares: "Books are good." The owner of the Collins Street landmark is well-positioned to know given her business is celebrating its 50th anniversary with one owner in the all-conquering digital age. Her store qualifies as an antiquity in its own right. So does her mother, Muriel Craddock, the 103-year-old matriarch who established the Essendon Treasure Chest on May 28, 1965, with her husband, Les ..." (The Age Newspaper)
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In the Press - Reinventing the Library

"Such colossal ambition coalesced under the Ptolemaic dynasty. In the third century B.C., more than half a century after Plato wrote his dialogues, the kings ordered that every book in the known world be collected and placed in the great library they had founded in Alexandria. Hardly anything is known of it except its fame: neither its site (it was perhaps a section of the House of the Muses) nor how it was used, nor even how it came to its end. Yet, as one of history's most distinguished ghosts, the Library of Alexandria became the archetype of all libraries ..." An excellent article by author, journalist and collector Alberto Manguel in The New York Times.
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Peter Whitfield Talks About the History of Travel Literature

In his new book "Travel: A Literary History" Peter Whitfield covers the broad genre of travel writing from the early accounts by missionaries to empire builders, thrill seekers and satirists. The book ranges from the travel stories of the Bible and the ancient Greeks to 20th century authors and adventurers like Patrick Leigh Fermor and Bruce Chatwin.
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ILAB congratulates Dr. Ina Kok - Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize

On Friday, 25th May during the ABA Rare Book Fair London - the ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography with an endowment of US$ 10,000 was officially awarded to Dutch scholar Ina Kok for her masterpiece of bibliographical research "Woodcuts in Incunabula Printed in the Low Countries" - followed up on Saturday with a presentation of the book at the fair.
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