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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
37 - 45 / 2089

From the Vault

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Congress

1956 - London

Translated by Mr. Martin Hamlyn from the official News Sheet of the Austrian Antiquarian Association
This Year the English Association (ABA for short) issued an invitation to London. The Association was holding its fifty year Jubilee, which coincided with the ten year jubilee of the ILAB. There was a record attendance at the Conference with over 160 foreign visitors so that (with a great number of ABA members and their wives and friends), all official functions were well attended, and at the Farewell Dinner there were over 350 present!Dear old London presented herself as of old. With here lovely parks, where, unexpectedly for us, deck chairs for everyone stood ready on the lawns, with her streets, mirabile dictu, full of considerate drivers, a refreshing lack of monster cars (though with plenty of imposing Rolls-Royces), everywhere friendly and modest, helpful people, staff not always greedy for tips, countless typically English businesses, looking back on a long tradition, with handsome galleries and libraries, and in them a profusion of the finest things, shown in a modern and practical fashion.As for the book trade with their inconceivably rich stocks, one has only to stroll through one of the big houses, Maggs, Quaritch, Edwards, Joseph and the rest, to understand what the English book trade means. To which it must be added that there are few pleasanter places in which to do business than the English book trade. If the antiquarian book trade as a whole complains of a lack of wares, the English trade even today is in the pleasant position of being able to count on quick replacement, since London is the place where the greatest supply is to be found. So every foreign visitor found a richly laid table ready, and, as we heard, some astonishingly large reductions were made on the occasion of the Conference. Further proof of the importance of these yearly Conferences for all concerned.
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Article

CABS 2020 CANCELLED

The 2020 Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar, CABS will not take place.
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On top of Vienna – Make the Antiquarian Book Business even more colourful on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day 2015!

Only 24 hours after the official opening of his new office, Norbert Donhofer invites customers, colleagues and booklovers to an ILAB Pop Up Book Fair on his roof terrace, to enjoy beautiful books, a beautiful view and a glass of wine. And please, bring flowers for the terrace! Plant them on the terrace and make the antiquarian book business even more colourful! Help fill the – symbolic – empty bookcases with – symbolic – book spines by making a donation for the UNESCO literacy projects in South Sudan! A year ago, it was ILAB President Norbert Donhofer's idea that ILAB should take part in the worldwide celebrations on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day. Now, on 23 April 2015 from noon to 3 pm the ILAB Pop Up Book Fair at Norbert Donhofer Rare Books on top of Vienna will be one of 30 worldwide ILAB events on that day!
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Golden Cockerel Private Press

Ninety years ago in Great Britain a private press was started that the world had never seen before. The name - Golden Cockerel and the books were 'British Hand-Made Limited Editions'.
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The Rare Book Trade - "Govern Yourselves Accordingly"

This was supposed to have been a review of last weekend's Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair. But the event went so smoothly, and was such a success, that there isn't really much to say about it. Load in and setup proceeded without a hitch. The venue was roomy and well lit, and a steady and enthusiastic crowd kept us on our toes all weekend, dealing with librarians, private collectors and even a smattering of that most sought after demographic, young people.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Margaret Fuller: America's First Feminist

May 23 is the birthday of writer Margaret Fuller (1810), who is considered the first American feminist. She wrote Women in the Nineteenth Century (1845), which is regarded as the first major feminist work published in the country. It was first published in The Dial Magazine, for which Fuller had served as founding editor before turning those duties over to co-founder Ralph Waldo Emerson. In the book, Fuller argued that mankind would evolve to understand divine love and that women alongside men would share in divine love. Fuller was a favorite in the New England Transcendentalist community. Among her friends were Bronson Alcott (Louisa May's father), Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, and Horace Greeley, for whom she worked as first literary critic of the New York Tribune. She served as foreign correspondent for the Tribune, touring Europe and setting in Rome, where she married. She was returning to the United States in 1850 but drowned, along with her husband and young son, when her ship hit a sandbar and sank off New York. She was 40 years old.
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