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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Renaissance

The Library of Symbolism - A Glossary and Bibliography of Renaissance Symbolic Literature

Published on 09 Nov. 2010
"For 2,000 years, from the time of Plato in 400 BC until the start of the modern era of empirical science in approximately 1600 AD, the culture of Western Europe was dominated by a single mode of expression: the symbol. The symbol was the universal medium for the approach to God, for the investigation of the natural world, for the interpretation of the Scriptures and for an understanding of and a guide to proper moral conduct. Towards the end of the period, enabled by the invention of printing by movable type, this obsession was translated into a vast literature of symbolism of which some eighty distinct species were identified by contemporary writers and theorists." The Renaissance symbolism refers to a time in which human thinking and the human view of the World changed radically. On the one hand Renaissance symbolism is one of the most interesting research fields for scholars. On the other hand it is one of the most fascinating fields of bibliophily at the very beginning of the history of printing.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Medieval Beauties, Revolutions, Mutinies, and Modern Art

The first event of the bibliophile's year, and one of the most traditional – From January 29 to 31, exhibitors from Germany, Australia, France, Italy, Great Britain, USA, Austria, Switzerland and the Netherlands offer masterpieces of book art and milestones in the history of ideas at the 49th Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair.
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Booksellers

Book Collectors - Palau Islands, Pacific Ocean, and Bochum, Germany

Buying collections is always an exiting business, at least for me. There are so many elements of surprise, even if you have an idea what is in the collection, because you helped build it. Here is one of my most pleasant recollections of buying from an old customer.
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Article

The Color of Old Prints

Many antique prints were initially issued with color, but many have been colored subsequent to their original publication. How does one distinguish between original color and new color? Does it matter? Here is brief guide to what you should know about the color of old prints ...
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Article

50th Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair 2011

"Rare Booksellers are generally regarded as highly individual and are not easy to move to participate in joint ventures", wrote former VDA President Günther Mecklenburg in his foreword to Catalogue 1 of the 1st Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair in 1962. A rather pessimistic statement – that soon turned out to be the contrary. In 1962, the Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair was the initial spark. It triggered a boom that invigorated and changed the antiquarian book market in Germany as only the Internet has done since then. As the oldest antiquarian book fair in Germany and the second oldest fair in Europe (after the London International Antiquarian Book Fair), it has resisted all economic crisis. Rare book dealers and collectors from all over the world have made the Stuttgart Fair one of their annual meeting places to buy and sell what is unusual, rare and beautiful.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - A 17-foot timeline

This large, folding chromolithograph (it's over 6.5m long) is Adams' Illustrated Panorama of History (London & Paris, A. H. Walker, 1878). First published in 1871 under the title Synchronological Chart by the Oregon pioneer minister Sebastian C. Adams, and in various later editions under different titles, this was, for a timeline chart, 'nineteenth-century America's surpassing achievement in complexity and synthetic power. Adams, who lived all of his early life at the very edge of U.S. territory, was a schoolteacher and one of the founders of the first Bible college in Oregon. Born in Ohio in 1825 and educated in the early 1840s at the brand-new Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, at the heart of the American abolitionist movement, Adams was a voracious reader, a broad thinker, and an inveterate improver. The Synchronological Chart is a great work of outsider thinking and a template for autodidact study; it attempts to rise above the station of a mere historical summary and to draw a picture of history rich enough to serve as a textbook in itself.
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Article

Bibliographies - Travel and Geography

Online: Lost Race Checklist - Discoverers Web
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