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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade

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Humperdinck’s „Hänsel und Gretel“ - Kitalálta, megcsinálta: A mai "Jancsi és Juliska" elé

The German composer Engelbert Humperdinck (1854-1921) is best known for his opera "Hänsel und Gretel". He began working on it in Frankfurt in 1890. He first composed four songs to accompany a puppet show his nieces were giving at home. Then, using a libretto loosely based on the version of the fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm, he composed a "Singspiel" of 16 songs. The opera premiered in Weimar on 23 December 1893, under the baton of Richard Strauss, who called it "a masterpiece of the highest quality". With its synthesis of Wagnerian techniques (Humperdinck had assisted Wagner 1880/81 in his production of Parsifal) and traditional German folk songs, Hänsel und Gretel was an overwhelming success. In 1923 the London Royal Opera House chose it for their first complete radio opera broadcast. Eight years later, it was the first opera transmitted live from the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Eduard Hanslick, a Bohemian-Austrian music critic, attended the premiere of „Hänsel und Gretel" in Vienna. The former supporter, then severe critic of Richard Wagner published his impressions of Humperdinck's opera in 1894. Adam Bösze has translated the text into the Hungarian language for his blog on rare books and the history of music.
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Bibliographies - Graesse, Trésor de livres rares

Online: Jean George Théodore Graesse, Trésor de livres rares et précieux: ou, Nouveau dictionnaire bibliographique ... 1859 ff.
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Why You Collect? Why I Collect. Why I Oughta… A Day With Comic Art Collector Warren Bernard

I'm curious to hear from readers about how, or whether, the concept of 'rarity' entered your lives, and how it has expressed itself. Have you become, like Warren, a passionate collector of some obscure and wonderful class of object? Or, like me, become a dealer - that is, someone with all of the instincts, but none of the patience, of a collector? Or were you that guy out in the Best Buy parking lot at 3 in the morning? And how have other circumstances in your life - relative wealth or poverty; marriage and children; career, religion, race, politics, sexual orientation - how do you reckon these have informed your collecting (or non-collecting) habits?
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A Century of Rare Bookselling - Michael Ginsberg in Conversation with Marguerite Studer Goldschmidt

Marguerite Studer Goldschmidt was born in England to Swiss parents, she was educated in England and Switzerland. Her father, Paul Studer, was professor of Romance languages at Oxford University. In 1932 Marguerite began to study librarianship at the University of Geneva, apprenticed at the libraries of the Universities of Bristol (UK), Geneva (Switzerland) and Tubingen (Germany). She became assistant cataloguer at the University of Bristol library, associate of the British Library, and librarian of the Bush House Library at the BBC in London. There she met Lucien Goldschmidt: “on a double date for lunch at Lloyd's Corner. She remembers that he added money to the tip, a generous act that conveyed a sense of European manners and courtliness that even 59 years later still brings a smile. ‘He was a gentleman and I knew it then.’"
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London 1949 - The Social Aspect of the Third International Conference of Antiquarian Booksellers

At the height of the festivities, our host produced an unexpected guest, even more belatedly arrived than most of us. His country of origin seemed a little uncertain, and his choice of costume, doubtless a well-meant attempt to conform with English customs - an Ascot topper, blue blazer and flannel trousers - contrasted violently with a flaming beard of patriarchal dimensions and a monocle. But he passed amicably amongst us, leaning on a malacca cane, and was observed to greet with especial cordiality Mr. Ernest Maggs, whom he addressed as "Tovarisch." What finally gave the show away was less the accent than the timbre of a voice now as familiar on the League's platform as in the rostrum at Place du Port - for it was none other than our protean President, W.S.K.
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Essential Texts in Feminist Theory & Feminist Thought

A collecting tip for all who are interested in the history of society and culture: Marie C. Hansen has published a list of the most important works on feminist theory and feminist thought. From Mary Wollstonecraft to Virginia Woolf to Simone Beauvoir to "Mad Man". Some snippets:
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