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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Manuscripts

English Literary Manuscripts

Published on 29 March 2011
Among manuscript collectors in the English-speaking world, literature has had the most constant appeal; and until recently, when historical manuscripts have really come into their own, literary ones attracted most of the highest prices for post-mediaeval manuscripts. This appeal is due to the universal interest in literature itself; to the demands of doctoral dissertations; to the desire among some individuals, librarians, and editors for definitive collections; and no doubt also to the relative ease, in comparison with historical manuscripts, of selecting an area for collection.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Booksellers

The President on Safari - Sortie to the Sea - War with the Newts

ABA President Laurence Worms travels around the British Isles to visit as many antiquarian booksellers and members of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (International) during his presidency. You can read some reports of his exciting trips on ILAB.org. The full story is told in Laurence Worms' blog The President on Safari.
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Article

The Aldine Italic

From our survey of fifteenth century types it would appear that every country had its formal pointed black-letter; every country, save England, its classical roman type; and every country - except, perhaps, Spain - its cursive vernacular black-letter type, copied from the handwriting of the locality and time. Before 1500 Italy had no vernacular type simply because the current handwriting of Italy (which was not of the black-letter school) was only translated into type-forms at the beginning of the sixteenth century.
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Article

Rare Books in the Press - 16th-century manuscript could rewrite Australian history

"A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history. The document, acquired by Les Enluminures Gallery in New York, shows a sketch of an apparent kangaroo (''canguru'' in Portuguese) nestled in its text and is dated between 1580 and 1620. It has led researchers to believe images of the marsupial were already being circulated by the time the Dutch ship Duyfken - long thought to have been the first European vessel to visit Australia - landed in 1606." Read the whole story by Charli Newton in The Age:
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Article

David Batterham: Among Booksellers

For thirty five years bookseller David Batterham has been making buying trips abroad and describing his adventures in letters to artist Howard Hodgkin. He was looking for trade catalogues , fashion magazines and other illustrated journals but his colleagues interest him almost as much, seen in their homes and shops. The visitable bookseller, a vanishing breed, is here immortalised.
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Article

Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar Honoured by a $1 Million Donation

Message from Sally Burdon, ILAB President:
41 years of supporting and educating booksellers is a long and proud record. This summer, just like the 40 before that, the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar (CABS) guided and supported another 50 would-be booksellers, more experienced booksellers, librarians and collectors through the intricacies of the antiquarian trade.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Rex Stout created detective Nero Wolfe

Rex Stout (1886) is the creator of one of the most brilliant fictional detectives of all time, Nero Wolfe. Stout produced Nero Wolfe books for four decades, until his death in 1975. Stout wrote 47 novels and 40 novellas in the Wolfe series. His last two books, Death Times Three (novella collection) and Assault on a Brownstone (novella) were published in 1985.
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