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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Autographs

„Vom Autographensammeln" - The First Modern Handbook on Autograph Collecting

Published on 21 Feb. 2011
„Vom Autographensammeln. Versuch einer Darstellung seines Wesens und seiner Geschichte im deutschen Sprachgebiet" was written by Günther Mecklenburg in 1963. It was the first modern handbook on autograph collecting - and still is THE German book on this subject. In various chapters the author describes all the basics of autograph collecting, gives definitions of common terms and abbreviations used in catalogues as well as a list of relevant bibliographies, catalogue raisonnés and archives. Günther Mecklenburg explains how autograph collections are built, how they are described and valuated. He lists resources to identify the handwritings of artists, authors, politicians and scientists and gives valuable advice how to differentiate between the original autograph and forgeries.
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Understanding Book Descriptions

Edgar Franco, Dictionary of Terms

Published on 07 Dec. 2009
In English, French, German and Italian. "Contrary to common practice, this dictionary contains as few words as possible. I have limited the terms, to those used by antiquarian booksellers, which are not to be found in the usual bilingual, trilingual, or multilingual dictionaries. " Edgar Franco, Dictionary of Terms and Expressions Commonly Used in the Antiquarian Book Trade Edgar Franco's "Dictionary" was published by the ILAB in 1994. It is available as a pdf file, and as a print version.
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Understanding Book Descriptions

John Carter, ABC for Book Collectors

Published on 07 Dec. 2009
"Like all good reference books, the ABC for Book Collectors conveys much in a little, sets limits to its subject and keeps within them, and - saving grace - treats that subject with individuality as well as authority, in a style at once concise, forthright and witty. It is, in short, a masterpiece, whose merits are acknowledged by the fact that it has never, in forty years, been out of print." (Nicolas Barker in his introduction to the revised edition of the "ABC for Book Collectors", Oak Knoll Press 1995) John Carter, ABC for Book Collectors The ABC for Book Collectors is presented here, with our thanks, by permission of Bob Fleck, Oak Knoll Press. Nicolas Barker about the ABC for Book Collectors
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

In the Press - 9 Muses Who Inspired Incredible Literature

As there were nine muses in Ancient Greece, Sally O'Reilly portrays nine examples of notable literary muses throughout history for the Huffington Post: Dante fell in love with Beatrice Portinari; Aemilia Lanyer was Shakespeare's "Dark Lady"; His unrequited love for Fanny Brawne drove John Keats to write some of his best poems; Charles Dickens was inspired by Nelly Ternan, Charles Baudelaire took his inspiration from Jeanne Duval; Zelda Sayre became F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife and muse; Vivienne and T.S. Eliot's marriage was stormy and unhappy; the troubles in Yeats' life began when he met Maude Gonne; and Jack Kerouac's muse was one of the icons of the Beat Generation: Neal Cassady.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Margaret Fuller: America's First Feminist

May 23 is the birthday of writer Margaret Fuller (1810), who is considered the first American feminist. She wrote Women in the Nineteenth Century (1845), which is regarded as the first major feminist work published in the country. It was first published in The Dial Magazine, for which Fuller had served as founding editor before turning those duties over to co-founder Ralph Waldo Emerson. In the book, Fuller argued that mankind would evolve to understand divine love and that women alongside men would share in divine love. Fuller was a favorite in the New England Transcendentalist community. Among her friends were Bronson Alcott (Louisa May's father), Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, and Horace Greeley, for whom she worked as first literary critic of the New York Tribune. She served as foreign correspondent for the Tribune, touring Europe and setting in Rome, where she married. She was returning to the United States in 1850 but drowned, along with her husband and young son, when her ship hit a sandbar and sank off New York. She was 40 years old.
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Article

The Life of Bernard M. Rosenthal

"In order to prepare the descriptions, we have committed the cardinal sin of the bookseller: we have READ most of these books, or at least we have read in them, an unpardonable and economically quite ridiculous procedure which has, however, brought some surprising results."
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Article

41st ILAB Congress & 25th ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair - Official Welcome by ILAB President Norbert Donhofer

Paris for the 41st ILAB Congress, preceded by the 25th ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair and coinciding with the centenary of the Syndicat Français de la Librairie Ancienne et Moderne (SLAM). In his welcome speech ILAB President Norbert Donhofer traced the lines of SLAM's history, which is the second oldest antiquarian booksellers' association worldwide and one of the biggest and most influential organizations of the rare book trade.
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Article

Bookriot presents: Libraries of the Rich and Famous

Bookriot shows the Libraries of the rich and famous. Have a glance at the book shelves of Karl Lagerfeld, Diane Keaton, Woody Allen, Keith Richards, William Randolph Hearst, Sting, Julia Child, Richard A. Macksey, Mark Badgley and James Mischka. The latter is "only" the library in the weekend house. Look at them all, and you will become envious.
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