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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

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Bernard M. Rosenthal, Dictionary of Abbreviations

"German and Italian antiquarian booksellers and auctioneers are very fond of using abbreviations in their catalogs, sometimes on a rather lavish scale. This little dictionary, the first one of its kind, may come in handy to help unfamiliar readers.
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Blood and Laughter

For a few brief months the journals spoke with the great and unprecedented rage that neither arrest not exile could silence. At first their approach was oblique, their allusions veiled, and they fell victim to the censor's pencil. But people had suffered censorship for too long. Satirists constantly expanded their targets of attack, demolishing one obstacle after another as they went, thriving on censorship.
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Under the influence

This is the first edition in Russian of Thomas De Quincey's famous Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1822), a very rare book. The title reads: The confession of an Englishman who has taken opium. A work by Maturin, the author of Melmoth. The attribution is to the Irishman Charles Maturin, whose Melmoth the Wanderer (1820) had been published in Russian (via a French translation) in 1833.
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Article

Japanese Woodblock Ephemera

"For many people in the west mention of Japanese woodblock prints brings to mind the beautiful single sheet colour examples by artists such as Hokusai, Hiroshige and the many other artists of extraordinary skill working during the 18th and 19th centuries. Immense pleasure can also be gained from looking a little further and discovering the plethora of games, decorative papers, books, calendars, lists, news-sheets, maps, advertising, and ephemeral material of every kind that was published using woodblock printing methods during the Edo and Meiji periods." Sally Burdon's collecting tip is one of the highlights of BookFare 2, the recently published newsletter of the Australian & New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers (ANZAAB). Read the article and subscribe to further issues!
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Book Traces Interview with Professor Andrew Stauffer

There's an exciting new project at the University of Virginia that highlights the significance of the book as a physical object and the individual histories of library books. At a moment in which the physicality of university libraries (and others across the country) are under threat of depletion due to the looming presence of the electronic text, we couldn't imagine a more compelling project than Book Traces. It's a crowd-sourced web project sponsored by NINES at the University of Virginia, and it's led by Andrew Stauffer, a professor of 19th-century literature at UVA. We had a chance to catch up with Professor Stauffer to ask some questions about the origins, current uses, and futures of Book Traces.
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