Skip to main content
results: 28 - 36 / 60

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
854_image1_collinge.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

Paul Collinge - Radio Interview about the Changing Nature of the Antiquarian Book Trade

Published on 01 Aug. 2012
Paul Collinge of Heartwood Books in Charlottesville (USA) has been in the book business for more than 40 years. He is specialized in history, literature, Americana, Virginia and in books, manuscripts and ephemera related to Thomas Jefferson. Collinge is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA). In the American radio show The Spark he talks about the changing nature of the antiquarian book trade in the 21st century.
[…] Read More
743_image1_worms_hall_1.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

Suburban - The Bookshop of Anthony C. Hall

Published on 26 March 2012
A visit today to one of the most threatened of all species – something in fact not so far encountered on my travels – a genuine suburban bookshop. Those of us who are themselves suburban will no doubt remember how many there used to be. To Twickenham – familiar enough terrain for me, my school was within walking distance of the famous rugby stadium. One of the school's most charming customs (now I bring it to mind, probably its only one) was that the older boys were allowed the afternoon off each year to go to the 'Varsity Match.
[…] Read More
706_image1_aba_derek_mcdonnell.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

The Right Book - Derek McDonnell

Published on 31 Jan. 2012
Derek McDonnell has, over the course of 25 years at Hordern House, established himself as a pre-eminent dealer in Australiana and the history of Pacific exploration. He and his partner Anne McCormick have produced a series of beautiful and scholarly catalogues, which have established a new bibliographical standard for their subjects, as well as publishing a series of essential bibliographies. He enjoys a global circle of colleague friends and is one of the most admired figures in the trade.
[…] Read More
702_image1_aba_sam_fogg.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

“You’ve got to keep rolling the dice”

Published on 24 Jan. 2012
"I didn't decide to become a bookseller; I fell into it by accident. In my early 20s I was determined to be an artist and that's what I was until I reached about 25. Then I started helping a friend with a stall outdoors on the Portobello Road on Saturdays and, after a while, I got my own pitch. I happened to do better with the stall than I was doing at painting and I enjoyed it more than painting to a point. Then I started having children and so needed money, and I realised that I was doing more bookselling and less painting and I was actually enjoying it. The day I realised that, I stopped painting and just started focusing on bookselling." - Shelf Fullfillment, the new blog of the ABA, starts with a very interesting series of interviews by Beatie Wolfe.
[…] Read More
663_image1_laurence_safari_cathach_books.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

The President on Safari - Dublin’s Fair City

Published on 04 Nov. 2011
Laurence Worms, President of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (ABA), promised the ABA members that he would travel around the British Isles to see as many of his colleagues as possible. He publishes his travel accounts in his blog "The President on Safari". This is Laurence Worms' report about the legendary Irish hospitality and a very special trip to Dublin.
[…] Read More
621_image1_paris_2011.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

Vienna – Munich and Back

Published on 07 Sept. 2011
"Two Steinbach's at the same place would not have worked out": Michael Steinbach grew up in a rare bookselling family, but instead of taking over his father's business he moved from Vienna to Los Angeles, then to Munich, established his own firm, and travelled around the world. Now, after 40 years he has returned to his hometown, and he will certainly not hesitate to catch one of the next airplanes to Tokyo. Or Hong Kong? New York? Paris? Barcelona?
[…] Read More
568_image1_anton_and_arnoud_gerits.jpg
Booksellers Worldwide

"Rare book dealers need more than 'Fingerspitzengefühl', they need a kind of sixth sense, paired with profound knowledge."

Published on 21 June 2011
It runs in the family: In 1993 both father and son sat at the conference table of the Presidents Meeting in Los Angeles. Anton Gerits as ILAB President, Arnoud Gerits joined the meeting as delegate of the Dutch Antiquarian Booksellers' Association (NVvA). "I have grown up in a rare book selling family. Books, reading, and the interest in history and politics were vital for us", says Arnoud Gerits. He studied history and Dutch language and literature at the University of Amsterdam. In the 1970s most professors held their lectures about the Middle Ages. As he has always been a passionate reader with a special interest in history, he knew most books, facts, persons and epochs they were referring to in their lectures - and got bored. He took his degrees and thought about his future career. Then, one evening in Amsterdam, a friend celebrated the opening of his bookshop, and at the opening Arnoud Gerits met the owner of Athenaeum, one of Holland's largest independent bookstores founded in 1966. The owner urged him to establish his own business. "Anioud suddenly I knew: I wanted to become a bookseller." The next day Arnoud Gerits called his father, who said: "If you want to work in a bookshop, why don't you work for me?" A conversation with ILAB President Arnoud Gerits.
[…] Read More
28 - 36 / 60

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

CHELSEA DREAMS - Chelsea Antiquarian Book Fair, 7 to 8 November 2014

So – here I am (in my freshly tidied book-room) dreaming about all the treasures I'm going to find at this week's Chelsea Book Fair. Well – I say freshly tidied (see last post). It just about passed muster at this morning's inspection. Just about. The exact rhetorical diasyrm used was a kindly and encouraging, "Well, I can see you have been trying". Enough of that – I now have some freshly excavated shelf-space and I've found the cheque-book. No other way this can end but in some determined book-hunting at Chelsea. Better still, I don't have to say too much this week because I'm going to see you all there – at least I hope so. What excuse could you possibly have for not being there?
[…] Read More
Article

New Trends in the International Antiquarian Book Trade

We all blame the internet for dramatic changes in the rare book trade. But have our problems really changed within the last decades? Reading Anthony Rota's lecture given in Tokyo in 1990 you could be inclined to say: No! He writes: "Booksellers, like the collectors and librarians they serve, are conservative creatures. By their very nature they are resistant to change; yet they are caught up in the changes that beset us today, and if they do not welcome them they must at least learn to adapt to them if they are to flourish. The antiquarian book trade has managed to cope with changes over a number of centuries now, and I do not doubt for a moment that it will continue to do so."
[…] Read More
Article

A Bibliophile's Paradise

"Dreaming of a store devoted to books about books? Wake up to reality; Oak Knoll Books makes this fantasy come true."
[…] Read More
Article

Books from the Shelf - Rare Book Talks in Budapest

Adam Bosze, President of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Hungary (MAE), is a specialist in books and manuscripts on music from 15th to 20th century. His shop is located in Budapest, but he also exhibits at the major international antiquarian book fairs. Besides being an antiquarian bookseller, he is also a TV and radio journalist, who talks and writes about books and music in television, on the radio and in his blogs in the Internet. From the beginning of October onwards, every first and last Wednesdays of each month Adam Bosze will be talking about the books on music he finds interesting. The books he will talk about are from the shelves of his antiquarian book shop in Budapest. They may be boring or absolutely fascinating, depending on the audience's taste, but they will all be worth discussing.
[…] Read More
Article

The poem that gave us Santa Claus

The poem that gave us Santa Claus as an American tradition was first published anonymously in the Troy (NY) Sentinel in 1823. For generations, the poem was attributed to Clement C. Moore, a wealthy Manhattan biblical scholar. Then about a decade ago, a literary sleuth from Vassar College advanced the notion that the famous poem was actually written by Henry Livingston Jr., a gentleman poet from Poughkeepsie. The literary landscape at Christmas time has never been the same since.
[…] Read More
Article

SLAM Conferences 2010 - The Antiquarian Book

Conferences will take place at the Town Hall of the 6th arrondissement – Wedding Hall, 78 rue Bonaparte – 75006 Paris (métro: Saint-Sulpice), 16th February to 22nd June 2010, 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm. Programme:
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre