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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile

Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Lucien Goldschmidt (1912-1992)

Published on 27 July 2015
“Lucien Goldschmidt was a citizen of the world”, Nicholas Barker once wrote in The Independent. “He would have liked to be called that, but it would be more true to say that the world of which he was a citizen was one that he had largely created. His life was divided between books and the world of art. Booksellers and art dealers normally lead rather separate careers, but Goldschmidt combined both, giving to each his own individual, highly independent, taste. Words and images combined to form an outlook on the world that was, in one word, civilised.”
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Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile

Emil Hirsch (1866-1954) – Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile –

Published on 12 Dec. 2013
The fifth part of the series of 25 booksellers’ biographies from Ernst Fischer’s biographical handbook "Verleger, Buchhändler & Antiquare aus Deutschland und Österreich in der Emigration nach 1933" is dedicated to Emil Hirsch, who started his career in Munich in the year 1884 as an apprentice at Ludwig Rosenthal’s antiquarian bookshop. After working with Oscar Gerschel in Stuttgart, Zahn & Jaensch in Dresden and, as partner, with Gottlob Hess in Munich, he founded his own company in 1879. Emil Hirsch’s antiquarian bookshop and auction house very soon became the centre of bibliophily in the Bavarian capital. He was a founding member of the Gesellschaft der Münchener Bücherfreunde, encouraged Hans von Weber to establish the „Hundertdrucke“ and supported the Bremer Presse. Famous collectors, authors and artists like Karl Wolfskehl and Franz Marc were amongst his friends.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

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Joint Catalogue – 80th Anniversary of the Dutch Association of Antiquarian Booksellers (NVvA)

A "Fair-Less" Year: For the last ten years, this catalogue was issued on the occasion of the Antiquarian Book Fair at the Passenger Terminal in Amsterdam. Members of the Dutch Antiquarian Booksellers Association presented their treasures through the catalogue but also referred to the Fair, where one could view and touch books and prints in tangible form.
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Take the train to Haarlem on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day, 23 April, 2015!

Haarlem, founded in 1245, has been the historical centre of the tulip bulb-growing district for centuries and bears the nickname "Bloemenstad" (flower city). Since the Middle Ages, Haarlem, which lies on a thin strip of land above sea level known as the "strandwal" (beach ridge), is one busiest and richest places in the Netherlands. And on one of the busiest places in Haarlem ILAB booksellers will pop up on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day.
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - San Francisco on the Soviet Stage

Next week Simon Beattie will be exhibiting at the 48th California International Antiquarian Book Fair from 6-8 February, 2015, in Oakland. This week he shows us a most extraordinary books from his main field of interest: the cultural relations between the English-speaking world and Europe, especially Germany and Russia. This item - for sale at the California fair - shows a very special relation between Russia, Europa and California.
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Show me the Bunny. Beatrix Potter and Peter Rabbit. The 3 First Editions

I have been asked in the past, although not often, Why are there 3 first editions of Peter Rabbit? How can that be? The answer is that there aren't really. There can be only one true first, but there can be variations in the text and then commercially produced editions, each of which lays a claim to that title. With Peter Rabbit this is the case. There are three different books that are all referred to as First Edition, although qualified with the necessary publishing details as well, so we have ...
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Collecting - The Life of the Great Creator of Sherlock Holmes

On the 7th of July, 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle died at age 71 from a heart attack. On this the 86th anniversary of his death, we'd like to look at this famous author, spiritualist & physician and his lifetime contribution to so many different fields! Conan Doyle (as he is often called, though Conan Doyle is a combination of his middle and last names, as Conan is not a surname, as people often think!) was not born under auspicious circumstances. His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was an alcoholic and when Arthur was only 5 years old he and his siblings were dispersed to live with family and friends across Edinburgh. A few years later the family moved back together and for numerous years lived in near-poverty. Luckily, Doyle had wealthy family to support him and to send him to Jesuit boarding school in England for seven years beginning when he was nine years old. Despite a difficult home life and upbringing, Doyle apparently struggled leaving home for school – as he was incredibly close with his mother (and would remain so throughout his life) and cherished the stories she would tell him during his childhood. It is even said that his favorite part of school was writing letters home to his mother, and telling stories to his schoolmates that she had once told him!
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Where Frank Lloyd Wright and Carl Sandburg had drinks – An ILAB Pop Up Fair at the Cliff Dwellers Club on top of Chicago!

"Sweet home Chicago" is worth visiting for many reasons: Chicago between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River is an international hub for finance, commerce, industry, technology, telecommunications, and transportation with O'Hare International Airport being the busiest airport in the world.
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