Skip to main content
results: 1 - 8 / 12

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
1662_image1_goldschmidt_2.jpg
Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile

Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Lucien Goldschmidt (1912-1992)

“Lucien Goldschmidt was a citizen of the world”, Nicholas Barker once wrote in The Independent. “He would have liked to be called that, but it would be more true to say that the world of which he was a citizen was one that he had largely created. His life was divided between books and the world of art. Booksellers and art dealers normally lead rather separate careers, but Goldschmidt combined both, giving to each his own individual, highly independent, taste. Words and images combined to form an outlook on the world that was, in one word, civilised.”
[…] Read More
1265_image1_fischer_hirsch.jpg
Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile

Emil Hirsch (1866-1954) – Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile –

The fifth part of the series of 25 booksellers’ biographies from Ernst Fischer’s biographical handbook "Verleger, Buchhändler & Antiquare aus Deutschland und Österreich in der Emigration nach 1933" is dedicated to Emil Hirsch, who started his career in Munich in the year 1884 as an apprentice at Ludwig Rosenthal’s antiquarian bookshop. After working with Oscar Gerschel in Stuttgart, Zahn & Jaensch in Dresden and, as partner, with Gottlob Hess in Munich, he founded his own company in 1879. Emil Hirsch’s antiquarian bookshop and auction house very soon became the centre of bibliophily in the Bavarian capital. He was a founding member of the Gesellschaft der Münchener Bücherfreunde, encouraged Hans von Weber to establish the „Hundertdrucke“ and supported the Bremer Presse. Famous collectors, authors and artists like Karl Wolfskehl and Franz Marc were amongst his friends.
[…] Read More

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Melbourne Rare Book Week and 39th ANZAAB Australian Antiquarian Book Fair - July 19th to 29th, 2012

On Thursday night the The Australian and New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers (ANZAAB) launched the inaugural Melbourne Rare Book Week, which culminates in the 39th ANZAAB Australian Antiquarian Book Fair from 27th to 29th September 2012, when 35 leading Australian, English and American dealers will be exhibiting rare and valuable books, manuscripts, autographs, maps, prints and photographies of all ages and for all prices at the ANZAAB Rare Book Fair at Wilson Hall, The University of Melbourne.
[…] Read More
Article

The Memory of Mankind. The Story of Libraries since the Dawn of History

After the Renaissance, libraries found themselves faced with the task of solving hitherto unknown problems of internal organization; and again after the Enlightenment had produced the type of the scholarly reference library, the nineteenth century found itself harried by a series of grave new problems of organization. As the Renaissance was ushered in, large numbers of books had been transferred to new owners, and this took place at the beginning of the Enlightenment to an even greater degree. In the earlier age the Reformation had provided the impetus; now it was the French Revolution.
[…] Read More
Article

Collecting Rare Books, First Editions and Ephemera - Fine printing, fine dining

Sir Sydney Roberts, Secretary of Cambridge University Press, 1922–48, writes: 'The early 1920s were marked by a typographical renaissance which had a notable influence upon book-production; or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that the war interrupted a movement which had already begun … It is true that during the 'nineties new standards had been applied to the printing of poetry and belles-lettres, but it was not till after the war that publishers as a whole began to recognise that the basic principles of book-design could, and should, be exemplified as clearly in a half-crown textbook as in a three-guineaédition de luxe …
[…] Read More
Article

Rubens in Stuttgart

There are many books with a Rubens design. Even in books from the 19th century we find frontispieces copied from a Rubens design which was often simply reproduced and thus many editions were adorned with a Rubens.
[…] Read More
Article

Marie Curie - A Woman of Firsts

Marie Sklodowska Curie, the chemist and physicist famous for her pioneering work on radioactivity, was the first person awarded two Nobel Prizes (for chemistry and physics); the first female professor at the Sorbonne; and the first woman to be entombed in the Paris Panthéon for herself.
[…] Read More
Article

The Paper of Old Prints

In previous blogs I have looked at the subject matter which appears in old prints, as well as the processes used to make them. Another important aspect of old prints is the paper upon which the impressions are made, so today we'll take a look at this subject.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre