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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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fairytales

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Hans Christian Andersen

Published on 02 April 2013
2nd April 1805 was the birthday of Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen, whose fairy tales have delighted children and adults for generations. He wrote more than 150 stories, many of which have become part of the collective consciousness of western culture. Among his best-known stories are The Princess and the Pea (1835), Thumbelina (1835), The Little Mermaid (1836), The Emperor's New Clothes (1837), The Ugly Duckling (1844), The Little Match Girl (1848), and The Ice-Maiden (1861).
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

The Rare Book Trade - "Govern Yourselves Accordingly"

This was supposed to have been a review of last weekend's Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair. But the event went so smoothly, and was such a success, that there isn't really much to say about it. Load in and setup proceeded without a hitch. The venue was roomy and well lit, and a steady and enthusiastic crowd kept us on our toes all weekend, dealing with librarians, private collectors and even a smattering of that most sought after demographic, young people.
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Preserving the photographic heritage of the Middle East

"When Bank of America Merrill Lynch launched its $1m conservation grant programme in May 2010, the Arab Image Foundation (AIF), a Beirut-based non-profit organisation, applied and hoped for the best. When the recipients were announced, the young foundation was among distinguished institutions such as the Courtauld in London, the Hermitage in St Petersburg and Madrid's Reína Sofia to have conservation projects selected. Now that the project is under way, the foundation's director Zeina Arida admits she was surprised to be selected." Snippets from an article by Emily Sharpe in The Art Newspaper.
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Article

Umberto Eco (1932-2016)

I was deeply saddened upon learning of the death of Umberto Eco, Patron of Honor of ILAB and ALAI, philosopher, scientist, homme de lettres, customer and friend to so many of us. I am extremely grateful to have met this outstanding person many times, and I remember the many discussions about books with him during the book fairs in Milano. He was, by all fair means, a brilliant thinker and an extremely cultivated and educated man. What probably counts even more, is the fact that he had a critical look on his beloved country, Italy, and he didn't hesitate to oppose many politicians whenever he had the feeling that they were wrong.
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The Art of American Book Covers - Evangeline Mary Daniell

I only know of one cover by Evangeline Mary Daniell, who also went by the signature "Eva," but it is such an exceptional Art Nouveau design that it's likely there are others to be found. Please do post a comment if you know of any. Her monogram EMD is on both the cover and dust jacket of the first printing of The Seven Seas by Rudyard Kipling, the first American edition, published by Appleton in 1896. The monogram was removed from the cover on the 1897 and subsequent editions, but remained on the jacket. Three copies were in the first exhibition of American Decorated Publishers' Bindings 1872-1929 (2005).
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Article

How James Boswell Revolutionized Copyright Law

Born on October 29, 1740 James Boswell is best remembered for his momentous Life of Johnson. Often regarded as the most important biography written in the English language, Boswell's masterpiece is certainly an incredible contribution to the world of literature and books. But during his own lifetime, Boswell was much better known for another contribution: his role in the establishment of new copyright law for the United Kingdom.
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