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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade

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You Cataracts and Hurricanoes! - A Treatise on Meteorology: From the Encyclopedia Metropolitana

I focus not on a reference book but on a single entry today — still, it's large enough to be published as a substantial book in its own right. This is George Harvey's entry on meteorology for the Encyclopedia Metropolitana — what Tom McArthur calls "the grand but ill-fated Encyclopaedia Metropolitana." Samuel Taylor Coleridge was involved in the planning, though he backed out as soon as it began appearing in 1818, as did most of the others who started it. A total of thirty quarto volumes, stretching to more than 22,000 pages and 565 plates, appeared over the next twenty-eight years.
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Article

Collecting Music in Hungary

I procrastinated writing this text for a very long time, and I spent the last few weeks wondering why it was so hard to write about what I do. After some self-scrutiny it became clear that primarily, it was my laziness that prevented me from doing so. At the same time, I was also forced to realize that I would have to be painfully honest in this article, if I really intended to provide an authentic picture of collecting music in Hungary. It makes sense to start with institutional collections since private clients only rarely spend money on old sheet music, books on music and authographs.
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Article

Recently published - The Oxford Companion to the Book

"This magnificent reference work is a tribute to - and celebration of - a revolutionary invention ... An extraordinary tour de force, a cornucopia of bookish information ... These volumes, then, are a paradise for book-lovers " (Noel Malcolm, Sunday Telegraph).
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Congress

1964 - Ravenna

By S.C. (Stanley Crowe?)
At the invitation of the Italian Association, approaching 200 delegates and friends, drawn from 14 nations, gathered at Milano-Marittima on Tuesday, September 1, for the 17th Congress of the ILAB. Milan-Marittima is a seaside resort on the Adriatic Coast, about 10 miles from Ravenna. It is entirely a modern development with spacious tree-lined avenues, and really an extension of neighbouring Cervia, whose history dates from Roman times.
While the Annual Congress is primarily an Annual General Meeting and performs an essential function in this respect, it is, however, in the accompanying social programme that most delegates find greatest interest. It lies in the special opportunities afforded in a gathering of this sort to meet or get to know those of like kind in other nationalities and, in particular, to learn more of the country in which the Congress takes place. The organising committee and the presidents of the various delegations all work hard. The ordinary delegates and their friends are mainly free to enjoy themselves. It is the prerogative of any member of any national association to join a congress and take advantage of a unique opportunity, on payment of the participation fee. I was such a one, so that this is the Congress as seen by a very ordinary delegate.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The First Flight Across the Atlantic

This week book lovers take their planes to New York to visit the 54th annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory, which runs from 3rd to 6th April 2014. Michael Slicker commemorates the first flight across the Atlantic and the books written about it. - A U.S. Mail pilot named Charles Lindbergh gets the credit for flying nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean by himself in 1927, and deservedly so, but he wasn't the first to fly across the Atlantic. That distinction goes to the crew of the Curtiss NC-4 floatplane, a name considerably less imaginative than the Spirit of St. Louis, and the feat took place in 1919, some eight years before Lucky Lindy's historic excursion. A book about the accomplishment published the same year is in the collection of rare and unusual books at Lighthouse Books, ABAA. The Flight Across the Atlantic was issued by the federal Department of Education in 1919 under the auspicies of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Corporation. The trip took 19 days, including time for repairs and rest for the crew. Lindy's hop took 33.5 hours. But, hey, these guys weren't in any hurry and they weren't carrying a load of mail.
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Article

One should not miss this chance to learn and to collect! – Michèle Noret’s Catalogue 11

One year after her glorious Catalogue 10 Michèle Noret has published a new catalogue, again a wonderful collection of remarkable picture books and illustrated children's books of the 20th century. Collectors and antiquarians who know the market, also know, that it is absolutely no matter to bring together such a richness and variety of book-art. Michèle Noret obviously has a good nose for this sort of books, but it is not only her resourcefulness, that helps her, it is her great knowledge and competence and her aesthetic intelligence which lead her to find these wonderful books and graphic art - and(!) to describe them in an adequate and always informative way. Looking through her catalogues always means to get in touch with important names, styles, developments of book-art, specialties of illustrative art. The series of her catalogues (happy the collectors who kept them!) is like an international compendium of modern artist's books for children, indispensable for an intensive knowledge in this field, a real source book thanks to the many coloured illustrations. (A desideratum would be an index of titles and artists which comprehends all of the catalogues.)
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