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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade

From the Vault

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The ABAA and ILAB, Part 1 and 2

Before I address the costs and benefits, a short review of just what ILAB is, how it is governed, and how each member nation is represented seems in order. I apologize in advance (and once again), for what might seem needlessly technical, but it is necessary to understand the functioning of ILAB and the ABAA's relationship to it.
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Article

Glub

In the week leading up to this year's New York International Antiquarian Book Fair, and its two "shadow" fairs, I'd been in a state of preternatural excitement. Two promoters - Marvin Getman of Impact Events Group and John and Tina Bruno of Flamingo Eventz – were going head to head for supremacy in the satellite book fair market. First Getman crashed the Bruno's turf by scheduling a rival New York shadow show, then the Brunos trumped Getman by moving their shadow show to a new location just across Lexington Ave. from the big show at the Park Avenue Armory. Cold war ensued. It began to get nasty, and I became increasingly excited by the steady stream of blog fodder. There could not be two more different promoters – in terms of personality, management style, and business practices – than Getman and the Brunos. By last Friday night I'd half convinced myself that their collision would result in a black hole of such magnitude that the entire trade would be sucked behind an unbreachable event horizon, allowing us all to go home and rake our lawns. But something else happened. Or maybe I should say nothing happened.
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What do you see? Frontispieces of Margaret Cavendish – A Lecture by Maureen E. Mulvihill

Students of 17th century women writers, art history, and book culture will be interested in Maureen E. Mulvihill's observations on the articulate frontispiece portraits of Margaret (Cavendish), Duchess of Newcastle, published in her remarkable corpus of work. With digital images, a table display of rare books (Mulvihill Collection), and a distributed bibliography, Maureen E. Mulvihill (Princeton Research Forum, Princeton NJ) will engage with these visual constructions as physical artifacts of 17th century book design and as 'text' to be read and parsed on the writer's character and identity. Keynote speaker Maureen E. Mulvihill is a broadly published specialist on women writers, rare books, the London & Dublin book trade, and the intersection of literary text and the visual arts. She also has published on Rubens, Van Dyck, the Elzeviers, printers' marks, watermarks, woodcuts, and the Stuart legacy of Veronese. She studied at Wisconsin, the Yale Center for British Art, the Columbia University Rare Book School, and, as an NEH Fellow, Johns Hopkins University. Since the 1980s, she has been a visiting professor and speaker on many campuses. She is at work on Irishwomen's political writings and response c1603-1801.
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Article

Collecting Crime (Fiction) - A Very Shocking Shocker

It was Simon Beattie who kindly put us in touch with a dealer on the continent who had this for sale. Not something he wanted, but thought we might. Quite what grounds he had for thinking this, I'm not at all sure – lurid, criminous, obscure author, published by a trio of even more obscure publishers, set in a vividly realised 1890s London, inscribed by the author, no copies on the internet – nothing at all there to appeal to me that I can see. As Simon himself likes to deal in 'The Books You Never Knew You Wanted' (see his delightful blog of that name: link in the Blogroll) – I suppose this by definition probably makes Death and the Woman one of those books you never knew you didn't want – but then (to judge from recent sales) that's probably becoming a fair summary of most of our stock.
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Why California Isn’t Called “Nova Albion”

On June 17, 1579, Francis Drake claimed California for England. He anchored his ship, the Golden Hind, just north of present-day San Francisco and named the new territory "Nova Albion." But despite Drake's claim in the name of Queen Elizabeth I, he was not the first European to explore California.
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Bibliographies - Incunabula

Online: Incunabula Short Title Catalogue (ISTC) - Union Catalogue of Incunabula (GKW) - Munich Incunabula Collection - INKA Catalogue of Incunabula, Tübingen - L. Hain, Repertorium bibliographicum - W. A. Copinger, Supplement to Hain's Repertorium Bibliographicum - Dietrich Reichling, Appendices ad Hainii-Copingeri - M. Pellechet, Catalogue Général des Incunables des Bibliothèques publiques de France - Alfred W. Pollard et al., Catalogue of books mostly from the presses of the first printers showing the progress of printing with movable metal types through the second half of the 15th century - Bancroft Library of Incunabula - History of the Book Title
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