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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Publishers

Book Trade History - George Berger and his Sons 1796-1868

Published on 23 Sept. 2015
GEORGE BERGER was a very active bookseller and publisher in the first half of the 19th century, who worked out of Holywell Street, off the Strand, and who at one point, prior to the arrival of W.H. Smith, was the largest newsagent in London (Louis James, Fiction for the Working Man, 1963). Yet, as was the case with many of his contemporaries – George Purkess, William Strange, and George Cowie, for example – very little was known about him. Until now…
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Publishers

How to Identify First Editions from G.P. Putnam's Sons

Published on 04 July 2013
Since its inception in 1838, G.P. Putnam's Sons have grown into one of the most respected - and controversial - publishing houses in the United States. In 1996, the publishing house became an imprint of the Penguin Group and continues to publish the works of outstanding authors of both fiction and non-fiction.
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Publishers

How To Identify Simon & Schuster First Editions

Published on 22 May 2013
One of the four largest English-language publishing houses, Simon & Schuster now publishes over 2,000 titles a year under 35 different imprints. The firm started by publishing crossword puzzle books and grew to publish some of the world's most recognized authors. How to identify Simon & Schuster first editions.
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Publishers

Cathy Henderson and Richard Oram on the history and collecting of books published by Alfred A. Knopf

Published on 12 July 2011
The Harry Ransom Center holds the Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. archive, which includes books published under the Borzoi imprint and books from Alfred A. and Blanche Knopf's personal library. Nigel Beale interviews the Associate Directors for Exhibitions Cathy Henderson and Richard Oram, co-authors of "The House of Knopf", a book that contains collected documents from the Knopf, Inc. archive and is part of the Dictionary of Literary Biography series.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

ILAB CONGRESS, BUDAPEST 2016 - CALL FOR SCHOLARSHIP FOR TWO YOUNG ANTIQUARIANS

The Hungarian Antiquarian Booksellers' Association is proud to give the opportunity to TWO YOUNG ANTIQUARIANS to participate in the 42nd ILAB Congress in Budapest between 21 and 23 September, 2016. Please send us the application of any young antiquarian of your choice by 31 May, 2016 consisting of the short CV of the applicant and a brief recommendation by the president of the national association stating why the particular candidate would benefit from participating in the congress, how he would enrich his/her home association and contribute to the event. Having received all applications, the Hungarian association together with the leaderships of ILAB will select the two fortunate candidates whose congress fee and hotel expenses will be covered by the Hungarian association, leaving only the travel costs to be paid from own sources.
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Booksellers

“My highest priority is to build up confidence in the professional antiquarian book trade”

In mid-April the Austrian antiquarian bookseller Norbert Donhofer was elected ILAB President. In an interview with Bettina Führer he talks about recent challenges of the international antiquarian book trade and his plans for the upcoming two years of his presidency.
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Article

I bet you can't become the biggest selling female author in the World. Or, Agatha Christie's The Mysterious Affair at Styles

Agatha Christie apparently wrote The Mysterious Affair at Styles as the result of a bet. The loser of this bet, her sister, thought that Christie couldn't write a crime detective story that kept the reader guessing the identity of the murderer until the end, despite knowing everything that the Detective knew throughout. She not only lost the bet in a spectacular fashion but in the process kick started the career of the biggest selling female author the world has known. Shakespeare beats Christie's 3 - 4 billion estimated books sold, but he does have 300 years head start by dying in 1616. Christie wrote "Styles" in 1916.
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Article

Sydney Rare Book Fair, 5-7 November 2015. Officially opened by ILAB/ANZAAB Patron of Honour David Malouf

Lovers of rare and collectable books in Sydney are in for a treat this year. The heritage Customs House at Circular Quay, only five minutes from the Sydney Opera House, will host the Sydney Rare Book Fair from Thursday November 5th to Saturday November 7th. Books, manuscripts, maps, prints, photographs and ephemera will be offered for sale by leading dealers from all over Australia.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - A 17-foot timeline

This large, folding chromolithograph (it's over 6.5m long) is Adams' Illustrated Panorama of History (London & Paris, A. H. Walker, 1878). First published in 1871 under the title Synchronological Chart by the Oregon pioneer minister Sebastian C. Adams, and in various later editions under different titles, this was, for a timeline chart, 'nineteenth-century America's surpassing achievement in complexity and synthetic power. Adams, who lived all of his early life at the very edge of U.S. territory, was a schoolteacher and one of the founders of the first Bible college in Oregon. Born in Ohio in 1825 and educated in the early 1840s at the brand-new Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, at the heart of the American abolitionist movement, Adams was a voracious reader, a broad thinker, and an inveterate improver. The Synchronological Chart is a great work of outsider thinking and a template for autodidact study; it attempts to rise above the station of a mere historical summary and to draw a picture of history rich enough to serve as a textbook in itself.
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