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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Bibliophily

Bibliophiler Salon 8. Oktober - Baden (Austria)

Der 6.Bibliophile Salon im Antiquariat Kainbacher in Baden bei Wien am Samstag, den 8.Oktober 2016 wurde wieder zu einem schönen Event für Buchsammler, Wissenschaftler und Historiker. Das Thema: Piraten, Freibeuter und Sklavenhändler in der Südsee lockte ca. 45 Besucher an. Die Vorträge hielt Universitätsprofessor Dr. Hermann Mückler, der als Experte für den Pazifischen Raum hochinteressante Themen rhetorisch und graphisch auf höchstem Niveau aufbereitet hat.
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Bibliophily

Unique! The Max Morgenstern Collection, presented by Norbert Donhofer at the 54th Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair

When the 54th Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair opens its doors to visitors from 23 to 25 January 2015, book lovers will have the rare opportunity to admire the highlights of a unique collection from the grand times of the Viennese "Belle Epoque". In a series of two catalogues the Austrian rare book dealer Norbert Donhofer presents the library of Max Morgenstern (1883-1946) consisting of private press books, illustrated books, and precious bindings of the Wiener Werkstätte. Part 1 of this extraordinary gathering of bibliophile treasures – documented in a richly illustrated catalogue – will be on display at the Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair: one more reason not to miss the second oldest fair in the world!
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Bibliophily

Bibliotour

The last couple of weeks have seen me in Germany and America, visiting book fairs, customers, and libraries. I have always enjoyed the international nature of the book trade. As regular readers of this blog will know, I have a particular interest in the cultural history of France, Germany, and Russia, especially in how these cultures interact with the anglophone world. So it was a pleasant surprise to find the following, two weeks ago, in Frankfurt ...
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Bibliophily

The Grolier Club – Exhibitions, Lectures, Meetings, September to December 2014

The mission of the Grolier Club is "to foster the study, collecting, and appreciation of books and works on paper, their art, history, production, and commerce". To this purpose numerous books and exhibition catalogues are published or sponsored, and a series of book-related events is regularly being held at the Grolier. The fall season of Grolier events starts in September with a Seamus Heaney exhibition followed by other amazing lectures, exhibitions and meetings until December 2014, including the first "Grolier Club Hundred Exhibition" in twenty years. An overview:
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

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‘I never have any luck with my books’ – Collecting the works of Friedo Lampe

Lampe was born on 4 December 1899, in the northern city of Bremen, a place which would exert a particular influence on his writing. At the age of five, he was diagnosed with bone tuberculosis in his left ankle and was sent to a children's clinic over 100 miles away, on the East Frisian island of Nordeney; he spent a total of three years there, away from his family, before being pronounced cured, but it left him disabled for the rest of his life. As a teenager, Lampe was a voracious reader (E.T.A. Hoffmann, Kleist, Büchner, Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Boccaccio, Cervantes, Dostoevsky, Shakespeare, Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe) and an insatiable book buyer: 'It really is an illness with me. I just have to buy every book, even if I don't have the money.'
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Rare Books - When is an inscription not an inscription?

Two folks identified the key elements of this month's crocodile mystery in their comments: Misha Teramura correctly noted that the inscription in the middle of the page - "pp. 184-190 refer to the progress of religion westward toward America" - refers to George Herbert's final poem from The Temple, "The Church Militant." And David Shaw noted that the other inscriptions - "8652″ on the top left and "A176″ on the bottom right - look to be an accession number and a shelf mark. But let's back up for one moment to understand why I find these marks interesting. The book in question is a first edition of George Herbert's The Temple (STC 13183). It's an interesting work, and a popular one in the 17th century. And as you can see from the notations on the front pastedown and the recto of the first free flyleaf, it's a work that was prized by later collectors.This particular copy was owned by Sir Leicester Harmsworth before it came into the Folger Shakespeare Library collection, and its value is shown in part by the blue goatskin binding signed on the bottom turn-in by Riviere and Son. Its value is more obviously indicated by the inscription on the pastedown, "a copy sold in the Terry sale in Dec 1935 for $3600."
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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Mysterious Waters

We know of course that there are earlier fictions with claims to priority as tales of detection – stories in Chinese, in Arabic, Voltaire's Memnon (1747 – better known as Zadig, ou, La Destinée), William Godwin's Things As They Are, or, The Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794), the anonymous Richmond; or, Scenes in the Life of a Bow Street Officer (1827) and above all, of course, the three stories published in the USA by Edgar Allan Poe and featuring the amateur sleuth C. Auguste Dupin – The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841), The Mystery of Marie Rogêt (1842) and The Purloined Letter (1844). All honour to them, they make their own case, but deep in our English hearts we know there is only one proper sort of detective – the Man from the Yard – and it is only with these modest tales in Chambers that we reach the real thing – the first professional detective in English fiction.
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