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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Motoring

Insider Collecting – Rare Books on Automobiles, Ships, Steam Coaches

Published on 23 Nov. 2010
One of my principles in gathering books is to read a book perhaps in a paperback edition and having 'assessed' it, either put it back into stock, keep it on my shelves, find a hardback edition to replace it, or, ultimate accolade, find a first or fine edition. [André Gide summed it up when he said "Book collectors do not buy books to read - they buy books because they have read them]. Some twenty-five years ago in the Carnegie Bookshop in New York Dave Kirschenbaum showed us the finest pair of "Jungle Books" any of us had ever seen. Having bought them I said to my father - "You know where those are going don't you? Home beside All The Mowgli Stories." - And here is an interesting thing that serves to counter those who ask "Why spend money on a first edition when it is available in paperback?" When I sat down to read, in the original 19th century edition, the stories I knew almost by heart, they were suddenly given a fresh flavour - the flavour of 19th century India and the British Raj, simply through reading them in the original edition.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

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Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Six Hoaxes of Edgar Allan Poe

The origins of April Fools' Day are unclear. Some experts suggest that when the French shifted the New Year to January to correspond with the Roman calendar, rural residents still kept celebrating with the beginning of spring, which often fell around the start of April. They came to be known as "April fools." This theory, however, doesn't take into account that the new year would have been celebrated around Easter–which isn't associated with April first. It's more probable that our April Fools traditions grew from age-old pagan celebrations of spring, which included adopting disguises and playing pranks on one another. But some pranksters simply aren't satisfied to confine their exploits to a single day. One of these was Edgar Allan Poe, who was unabashedly fond of hoaxes. He approvingly called his time the "epoch of the hoax." During his lifetime Poe would attempt a total of six different hoaxes. Most modern anthologies fail to acknowledge that these stories were originally published as non-fiction.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Truman Capote

The books of the tiny terror of New York drawing rooms continue to be eagerly sought after. A young phenom, his books were mostly published in relatively large (for the time and genre) first printings. Thus when collecting Capote it is even more important then usual to look for particularly fine copies, as mediocre copies of most of his books abound.
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Article

New York Slate: A Bob Dylan Forgery (Why to be careful when buying at auction)

In one of the latest blog entries of Peter Harrington Rare Books (UK), Rachel Chanter describes the dangers of buying at auction. "This cautionary tale shows how far forgers will go to defraud dealers and avid collectors, and how they can sometimes exploit an auction house's less-than-rigorous approach to research. Fortunately, we were able to discover the spurious nature of this artwork, subjecting it to the same level of scrutiny as we do all the items we acquire, which is why we are able to assure customers of the legitimacy of everything we sell. "
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Article

What if They Were Right… Whoever They Were? (New York 2017)

The life of a journeyman major league book dealer (any one who makes his or her living in the trade as a hunter-gatherer, anyone not named Bill, Jim, Pom, Ed, or Don, or anyone not from the other side of the Atlantic whose shoes are worth more than most of your books)… this journeyman life, I say, is a simple one.
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The Mulvihill Collection of Rare & Special Books and Images

The Florida Bibliophile Society Web site has now posted, from the December 11, 2011 issue of the Society's newsletter, a digital copy of the Society's two-page feature on Maureen E. Mulvihill's recent talk on her collection, hosted by the Florida Bibliophile Society and the University of Tampa Library.
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Love for Sale - An Auction Catalogue

Love for sale – The story is simple: Lenore Doolan is 26 years old and working for The New York Times as a cake columnist, Harold "Hal" Morris is a globe-trotting photographer in his early 40s. Disguised as Lizzie Borden and Harry Houdini, they met at a Halloween party, fell in love with each other, have a happy time full of romantics, share everyday life in a New York flat – and split up after a little more than three years. And then they do what not only famous people nowadays often do when a change in life arises: They pack their things, give them to an auction house, where a sale is announced ...
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