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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Women

Women in Revolutionary Debate. Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Published on 20 Jan. 2012
Stephanie Russo is a lecturer at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. Her research is focused on the 18th and 19th century novel. Her new book, published by Hes & de Graaf, is a very good read, and a highly important work for everyone who is interested in the history of ideas, culture and society, and, in particular, in the history of women who did not only embroider cushions while waiting in the parlour for Mister Darcy, but who took their opportunities to change their situation and to influence their society by means of literature.
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Women

Amor vincit omnia - Women Travellers II

Published on 21 Sept. 2011
I would like to introduce this instalment on Women Travellers with a quote by noted explorer and chauvinist, Samuel Hearne: "Women were made for labour: one of them can carry or haul as much as two men do. They also pitch our tents, make and mend our clothing, keep us warm at night … they do everything, and are maintained at a trifling expense." Not everyone will agree with the bit about trifling expense. But anyone who has ever made a trip with a female companion that involved more than getting into a train or onto a plane, knows what old Sam is on about. And so, without further ado, I introduce to you five stalwart ladies, who sometimes turned out to be even braver than (their) men.
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Women

Amor vincit omnia - Women Travellers

Published on 30 Aug. 2011
Much has been written about travelling women, women travellers, willing or unwilling. Many great names spring to mind: Alexandra David-Neel, Ida Pfeiffer, Isabella Bird, or Emma Roberts to name but a few. We know a lot less about women who accompanied their husbands or lovers, or even met them during their peregrinations. Many of them were hardly mentioned in the books the men wrote. Others wrote their own version of what happened, and this is often the more interesting book, because it shows the world from an entirely different angle.
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Women

Collecting Women Writers: Julia Peterkin, Ellen Glasgow, Margaret Ayer Barnes, Alice Walker

Published on 07 July 2011
"Everyone knows Alice Walker's 1982 novel The Color Purple, but not everyone knows that the first issue jacket has only one address for the publisher on the rear flap – later issues have two." - "Peterkin's Pulitzer-winning novel Scarlet Sister Mary (1928) turns up occasionally, but there we have seen two variants of the jacket and haven't yet been able to determine whether one precedes or not." - "Spoken pompously, and with an air of experience: "Yes, my dear fellow, its the only copy we've ever seen (sotte voce: this week)." What is worth collecting or not among the works of Julia Peterkin, Alice Walker, Margaret Ayer Barnes and Ellen Glasgow.
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Women

Christine de Pizan: A Fifteenth Century Champion of Women

Published on 16 Feb. 2011
"Many think of power in the Middle Ages as a male-dominated sphere. In many ways it was. History records that men held what was called the formal, direct exercise of public authority. They controlled the Church and the aristocracy, the two power centers in medieval culture." However, there were exceptions to the rule. Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos writes about a "women champion": Christine de Pizan.
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19 - 26 / 26

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

ILAB History

1961-1970

The admission of Japan, the ILAB Bibliography Prize (now ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography) and the first ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair were the milestones of the 60s.
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Article

A Conference on the Occasion of the Publication of Ina Kok: Woodcuts in Incunabula printed in the Low Countries

Hes & De Graaf Publishers, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands (KB) and the Dutch Book Historical Society (NBV) are organising a conference on 12 April 2013 on the occasion of the publication of the long awaited revised edition of Ina Kok's widely admired and groundbreaking dissertation on the woodcut illustrations in incunabula printed in the Low Countries between 1475 and 1501. The conference will be held at the Aula of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands, The Hague.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Lutheran best-seller turned Jesuit boxed set

Books in boxes have always held a particular appeal. But this I found particularly attractive. It's a book from 1738, Güldenes Schatz-Kästlein der Kinder Gottes (A Golden Treasure Chest for the Children of God), which has been cut into individual leaves, all the edges gilded, and then put into a custom-made gilt-tooled morocco box which features the figure of Justitia and the seal of the Society of Jesus.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - William S. Burroughs and the Arts

There are a lot of "what ifs" in book collecting. What if I had bought this and not that? What if I had more money? Or more time? What if I collected this and not that? "What if I did not collect William Burroughs?" is a question I consider. In a piece I wrote over a decade ago, I came to the conclusion that I would have collected Charles Olson instead. The question that serves as the boundary I can never cross or the horizon I can never see beyond is "What if I did not collect?" Such a question throws my very existence into doubt like "What if my parents never met?" If I did not collect, I quite simply would not be the same person I am now.
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Article

Collecting - Calendars

New Year's is traditionally a time to look forward, and also to reflect on the past. In the spirit of the holiday, we would like to highlight four calendars, from very different time periods: A 1969 wall calendar commemorating the African American Civil Rights Movement with bold prints, a calendar of color woodcut illustrations published by the leading art journal of the Vienna Secession in 1903, an ornate Renaissance-inspired Italian calendar from 1899 accompanied by the original pen and watercolor drawings, and a luxurious embroidered almanack from 1792 small enough to be tucked in one's pocket.
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Article

Book Scouting in Japan - Introduction: The Back Story

Rare book dealer and photography specialist Harper Levine travels through Japan with photographer John Gossage where Harper was welcomed at the airport as the "best book dealer (also best blogger) from East Hampton". Bibliophiles may follow his book scouting traces in Tokyo reading his fabulous blog.
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