Skip to main content
results: 19 - 26 / 26

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
700_image1_forum_women.jpg
Women

Women in Revolutionary Debate. Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Published on 20 Jan. 2012
Stephanie Russo is a lecturer at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. Her research is focused on the 18th and 19th century novel. Her new book, published by Hes & de Graaf, is a very good read, and a highly important work for everyone who is interested in the history of ideas, culture and society, and, in particular, in the history of women who did not only embroider cushions while waiting in the parlour for Mister Darcy, but who took their opportunities to change their situation and to influence their society by means of literature.
[…] Read More
637_image1_frank_women_2_1_snow_baby.jpg
Women

Amor vincit omnia - Women Travellers II

Published on 21 Sept. 2011
I would like to introduce this instalment on Women Travellers with a quote by noted explorer and chauvinist, Samuel Hearne: "Women were made for labour: one of them can carry or haul as much as two men do. They also pitch our tents, make and mend our clothing, keep us warm at night … they do everything, and are maintained at a trifling expense." Not everyone will agree with the bit about trifling expense. But anyone who has ever made a trip with a female companion that involved more than getting into a train or onto a plane, knows what old Sam is on about. And so, without further ado, I introduce to you five stalwart ladies, who sometimes turned out to be even braver than (their) men.
[…] Read More
613_image1_frank_della_valle.jpg
Women

Amor vincit omnia - Women Travellers

Published on 30 Aug. 2011
Much has been written about travelling women, women travellers, willing or unwilling. Many great names spring to mind: Alexandra David-Neel, Ida Pfeiffer, Isabella Bird, or Emma Roberts to name but a few. We know a lot less about women who accompanied their husbands or lovers, or even met them during their peregrinations. Many of them were hardly mentioned in the books the men wrote. Others wrote their own version of what happened, and this is often the more interesting book, because it shows the world from an entirely different angle.
[…] Read More
584_image1_btc_peterkin.jpg
Women

Collecting Women Writers: Julia Peterkin, Ellen Glasgow, Margaret Ayer Barnes, Alice Walker

Published on 07 July 2011
"Everyone knows Alice Walker's 1982 novel The Color Purple, but not everyone knows that the first issue jacket has only one address for the publisher on the rear flap – later issues have two." - "Peterkin's Pulitzer-winning novel Scarlet Sister Mary (1928) turns up occasionally, but there we have seen two variants of the jacket and haven't yet been able to determine whether one precedes or not." - "Spoken pompously, and with an air of experience: "Yes, my dear fellow, its the only copy we've ever seen (sotte voce: this week)." What is worth collecting or not among the works of Julia Peterkin, Alice Walker, Margaret Ayer Barnes and Ellen Glasgow.
[…] Read More
Women

Christine de Pizan: A Fifteenth Century Champion of Women

Published on 16 Feb. 2011
"Many think of power in the Middle Ages as a male-dominated sphere. In many ways it was. History records that men held what was called the formal, direct exercise of public authority. They controlled the Church and the aristocracy, the two power centers in medieval culture." However, there were exceptions to the rule. Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos writes about a "women champion": Christine de Pizan.
[…] Read More
19 - 26 / 26

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

UK's Times deputy literary editor, James Marriott, confesses "Bibliomania"

" Books, glorious books — confessions of a bibliomaniac"
As a Radio 4 documentary about book collectors airs, the Times deputy literary editor, James Marriott, who lives in a room full of volumes, admits to his problem.
[…] Read More
Article

40. Seminar für Antiquare - Berlin 2010

Feel good – and learn something. The "Seminar für Antiquare" or workshop for antiquarian booksellers was founded in Munich 40 years ago. Since then it is held every spring with lectures by scholars and colleagues about book history and the trade, excursions to libraries and museums, practical courses in book restoration or the care of prints and photographs, and discussion groups related to legal, economic or technical questions of our everyday business. Legendary are the evening dinners.
[…] Read More
Article

500 year old Waldseemüller map found at the Munich University Library

"Munich librarians have found a rare 16th century world map that first gave America its name as a continent. The version by German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller survived World War II sandwiched between geometry books. The Munich version is smaller than the 500-year-old global map found in a German monastery in 1901 and handed over by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2007 to the US Library of Congress. Only four smaller versions were previously known to have survived" (dw).
[…] Read More
Article

The Girolamini Thefts - Marino Massimo de Caro Sentenced to 7 Years Imprisonment

Napoli Today reports that Marino Massimo De Caro was sentenced to 7 years imprisonment and lifetime exclusion from public office following an expedited trial for the embezzlement of hundreds of volumes from the Girolamini Library. The other defendants received shorter sentences.
[…] Read More
Article

A Brief History of Propaganda

The term "propaganda" has come to have a negative connotation in much of the English-speaking world. But in some places, the word is neutral or even positive. Why this difference? The reasons can be traced through the word's etymology and the way that this strategy of communication has evolved over the centuries.
[…] Read More
Article

Antiquarian Book Dealer Tom Boss on Copeland & Day, Stone & Kimball, and more …

Nigel Beale and Tom Boss talk about the history of Copeland & Day and other American publishers since the 1890s. Listen to the audio interview by Nigel Beale for Nota Bene Books.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre