Skip to main content
results: 10 - 18 / 26

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
1295_image1_steve_bookwoman.jpg
Women

The Strange Suicide of an Early 20th C. Female Rare Book Binder

Published on 12 Feb. 2014
On Sunday morning, December 29, 1913, at 11:30AM the body of Mary Effingham Chatfield, 42, an art bookbinder with work commissioned by many of New York's most eminent book collectors and private libraries, was discovered flung across a couch in her studio on the sixth floor of 400 W. 23d Street in Manhattan, NYC. She had been stabbed with a long, slender paper cutter with keen edge and point. On a nearby table a blood-splattered note was found with the cryptic accusation, "Mrs. Howard is to blame for this."
[…] Read More
1280_image1_slicker_lafarge.jpg
Women

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Marie LaFarge was convicted of murder

Published on 16 Jan. 2014
It is the birthday of murderess Marie LaFarge (1816), whose 1840 trial for poisoning her husband with arsenic became a cause célébre throughout France, with the public deeply divided over her innocence or guilt. She was the first person convicted by direct forensic evidence, and the case was one of the first followed closely by the public with daily newspaper reports. The trial was a spectacle attended by people from all over France. It included all the twists and turns of a good whodunit, including a celebrated expert witness and setbacks for both the prosecution and the defense. Marie LaFarge wrote her Mémoires(1841) while in prison. The novel The Lady and the Arsenic (1937) was based on the case as was the French film L'Affaire Lafarge (1938).
[…] Read More
1191_image1_vic1.jpg
Women

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Eliza Haywood, Overlooked Authorial Pioneer

Published on 17 Sept. 2013
Called both the "Great Arbitress of Passion" and insulted as "Juno of majestic size," Eliza Haywood occupied a complicated place among her contemporaries. The incredibly prolific author wrote novels, plays, and pamphlets, and her writing incited controversy among her peers. Today scholars appreciate Haywood's role as a feminist writer, and collectors can build an expansive and diverting personal library around her many works.
[…] Read More
1171_image1_ld_suffragette1.jpg
Women

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Suffragist Literature and The Private Library

Published on 21 Aug. 2013
A Convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of women, will be held in the Wesleyan Chapel, at Seneca Falls, New York, on Wednesday and Thursday, the 19th and 20th of July, current; commencing at 10 o'clock A.M. During the first day the meeting will be exclusively for women, who are earnestly invited to attend. The public generally are invited to be present on the second day, when Lucretia Mott, of Philadelphia, and other ladies and gentlemen, will address the convention.The women's suffrage movement that was launched at the Seneca Falls Convention did not occur in a vacuum. Suffrage (the right to vote) had been extended to women in various places and at various times throughout history. In fact, women's suffrage often preceeded universal suffrage, the effect being that only women of certain classes or races sometimes won the right to vote.
[…] Read More
1107_image1_slicker_fuller_feminist.jpg
Women

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Margaret Fuller: America's First Feminist

Published on 24 May 2013
May 23 is the birthday of writer Margaret Fuller (1810), who is considered the first American feminist. She wrote Women in the Nineteenth Century (1845), which is regarded as the first major feminist work published in the country. It was first published in The Dial Magazine, for which Fuller had served as founding editor before turning those duties over to co-founder Ralph Waldo Emerson. In the book, Fuller argued that mankind would evolve to understand divine love and that women alongside men would share in divine love. Fuller was a favorite in the New England Transcendentalist community. Among her friends were Bronson Alcott (Louisa May's father), Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, and Horace Greeley, for whom she worked as first literary critic of the New York Tribune. She served as foreign correspondent for the Tribune, touring Europe and setting in Rome, where she married. She was returning to the United States in 1850 but drowned, along with her husband and young son, when her ship hit a sandbar and sank off New York. She was 40 years old.
[…] Read More
903_image1_gg_1a.jpg
Women

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Female Marine and Her Sisters

Published on 23 Oct. 2012
Ann Thornton the female sailor and Sophia Johnson the friendless orphan are interesting in that their stories employ the same sequence of events that befell Elizabeth Emmons – personal tragedy, followed by cross dressing, followed by physical impairment. (Note Sophia Johnson's missing right arm.) Then there was Mary Lacy, "The Female Shipwright" who served four years at sea and seven years at Portsmouth Dock Yard in England, disguised as a man. Mary had a taste for young girls, and ascribed her troubles to a fondness for dancing with men - making for a delicious double reverse. However, the classic expression of this theme in American literature is the story of Louisa Baker, the Female Marine.
[…] Read More
846_image1_steve_women_1.jpg
Women

Women Who Read and Write Too Much

Published on 19 July 2012
In 1844, French painter and caricaturist Honoré Daumierpublished Les Bas Bleus, a series of forty lithographs satirizing bluestockings, i.e. intellectual women. They turn traditional gender roles topsy-turvy and cramp a man's style. Instead of doing the laundry they hang men out to dry. Sacrebleu!
[…] Read More
801_image1_lynch_etiquette_1.jpg
Women

These Days of Hatlessness - Emily Post's Etiquette

Published on 11 June 2012
Should I cover my tattoos and piercings before a job interview? Should I throw a divorce party? These questions are considered in the 18th edition of Emily Post's famous book on "Etiquette", revised and updated by the author's great-granddaughter. If you want to learn how to have a love affair or a cup of tea in high society during the 1920s, read the original edition, or Jack Lynch's collecting tip! Jack Lynch ist English professor at Rutgers University in Newark and the author of "You Could Look It Up: The Reference Shelf from Babylon to Wikipedia". In his blog "You Could Look It Up" he introduces (no: he presents) useful, classic, amazing, funny and extraordinary dictionaries of all possible subjects and from all centuries.
[…] Read More
10 - 18 / 26

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Booksellers

In Memoriam Menno Hertzberger (1897 - 1982)

For Menno Hertzberger the addition 'Internationaal' to his firm's name was not just an embellishment: From the very beginning onwards his business was internationally orientated, and it aimed for a wide public of bookcollectors, librarians and fellow-dealers. As early as 1921 Menno held his first auction-sale and he soon became known as an important auctioneer as well. The growth of the firm necessitated a move to larger premises and in 1935 the firm's new address became Keizersgracht 610 in Amsterdam, a large and elegant house along one of the famous canals. Menno Hertzberger, the Father of the League, died in 1986. Bob de Graaf's obituary characterizes him as a truly international antiquarian bookseller and a man with a vision: to unite dealers worldwide under one roof, the ILAB.
[…] Read More
Article

THE GUARDIAN - International relay of events set to mark Unesco World Book Day

"From a pop-up bookshop in Vienna's giant ferris wheel to book fairs in cities across South Korea, antiquarian booksellers around the world are preparing to host a 24-hour run of events later this month to raise money for children in South Sudan. To mark Unesco's World Book and Copyright Day on 23 April, 1,800 members of the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) are preparing a series of pop-up fairs featuring rare books. A mix of presentations, exhibitions, lectures and performances, the events will take place from South Africa to Russia, and New York to Munich, and will raise money for Unesco and actor Forest Whitaker's literacy projects in South Sudan. ILAB president Norbert Donhofer, who came up with the idea for the pop-up fairs last year, said: "The purpose of ILAB's participation … is to spotlight rare books and bookselling while raising money for what is at the very foundation of all we do – literacy."
[…] Read More
Booksellers

Walter Alicke

If you had visited the Stuttgart Antiquarian Book Fair about ten years ago you would seen when entering hall number 2 a six foot high pile of textile pattern books covered with a chain of blinking red lights.
[…] Read More
Article

Bibliographies - Religion

Online: Biographisch-bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) - The Catholic Encyclopedia - Katalog der Leichenpredigten (Funeral Sermons) - Bibliotheca theologica, by Enslin, Winer and Löflund
[…] Read More
Article

Searching for New Sources in Western History

All historians must be concerned with their sources. In many instances these are easily accessible, far more so today than in the past, in the relative convenience of professionally run university libraries, historical societies or museums. Since World War II academic institutions in the United States have enjoyed an extraordinary growth in their collections of the raw materials of American history, coupled with technological advances which have made it vastly easier to catalogue, locate and reach the original documents within the protective web of institutional control. It has never been easier to reach the books and manuscripts that are the bases of historical research.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre