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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Baedeker

Collecting Baedeker Travel Guides

Published on 24 Feb. 2010
Baedeker's travel guides were the premium travel guides of the second half of the 19th and the first part of the 20th century, giving rise to the verse: "Kings and governments may err – but never Mr. Baedeker." They are keenly collected, and some of them are extremely rare, like the famous and seldom seen "Athen" Baedeker from 1896, which was not sold outside Greece.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction and The Private Library

One of the most popular components of a private library is the mystery genre, which comprises a vast array of sub-genres such as detective fiction. The genesis of the detective fiction sub-genre may be traced to a short story penned by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841 titled The Murders in the Rue Morgue. All the elements of what we today recognize as the essential characteristics of the sub-genre are found in this short story: a brutal murder; baffled police; an independent investigator that solves the case through superior intelligence, humbling the police in the process.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Moving Pictures

In the century before cinema and television changed our lives forever, there were other ways of creating moving pictures. One such inventive Victorian method was the zoetrope (from the Greek zoe, 'life', and tropos, 'turning'), 'a mechanical toy or optical instrument consisting of a cylinder open at the top, with a series of slits in the circumference, and a series of figures representing successive positions of a moving object arranged along the inner surface, which when viewed through the slits while the cylinder is in rapid rotation produce the impression of actual movement of the object' (OED). You can watch a modern version of one here.
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Article

“The Precious Unprinted Contents of Books” – Handwritten notes, flowers and other things you find in rare books

Open an old book and find – a flower, or better: a bank note, photographs, letters, notes scribbled on the pages, exhibitions tickets. Even if a book is boring you may find something interesting between the lines or pages, if it is an old book, not a Kindle. The Guardian Book Blog muses about "marginalia and forgotten mementoes" in the age of the internet.
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Article

Collecting - Five Interesting Facts about Jean-Paul Sartre

Jean-Paul Sartre lived a full life. He is widely remembered for his contributions as a philosopher, playwright, and teacher. His notable works include his philosophical magnum opus, L'Etre et le néant [Being and Nothingness] which was published in 1943, and his plays,Les Mouches [The Flies], 1943 and Huis Clos [No Exit], 1947. His ideas have a continued influence on philosophical and literary studies today. But what are some other facts about the esteemed thinker? Read on to discover five interesting factoids about Jean-Paul Sartre.
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Article

Toronto International Antiquarian Book Fair - 12th to 14th October 2012

After a fifteen year hiatus, the 2010 Toronto International Antiquarian Book Fair was a great success and featured most of Canada's finest as well as many top international antiquarian booksellers. In 2012, this outstanding show will again bring booksellers and bibliophiles together for a three day event. Sponsored by the ABAC, the 2012 Toronto International Antiquarian Book Fair joins the prestigious San Francisco, New York and Boston fairs on the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers' (ILAB) 2012 North American calendar.
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Article

Books about Books: A History of Oak Knoll Press, Part 14: Moving again!

A traumatic change in our lives occurred in 1998, when we moved the business one block up the street to the third floor of the massive building called the New Castle Opera House. We had moved from Newark to 414 Delaware Street in New Castle in 1979, up the street to 212 Delaware, down the street to a renovated 414 Delaware, and now we had run out of room again. We had a three-story Victorian building with a finished basement full of new and rare books and had to get them all to the third floor of the Opera House at 310 Delaware Street.
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