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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Architecture

Collectors on Tour - Masonic Lodges in Constantinople (not Istanbul)

Published on 21 Jan. 2016
Working with rare and valuable books has a tendency to make the extraordinary seem rather ordinary. You start to wonder how certain agglomerations of leather, cloth, paper and ink can be worth so much. These doubts are cast aside, however, when confronted with something which makes a personal connection with you. The truth is that books, letters and diaries provide the most direct links between individuals from the past and those living in the present. Although it is the messages they transmit which are invaluable, surely paper and ink are no less valuable as tangible markers of history than art or architecture?
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Architecture

The Most Progressive Magazine of its Time, a Work of Art

Published on 12 April 2011
"In Holland, the birthplace of De Stijl, modernism took various routs that ran the aesthetic gamut from hybridized Art Nouveau to systematic rationalism. Somewhere between these poles was the magazine Wendingen (Upheaval), one of the principal sources for the chronicling of twentieth-cetury design and architecture." The famous Dutch magazine Wendingen, published between 1918 and 1931, was dedicated to modern architecture and design. Stephen J. Gertz describes its influences on the history of art and modern aesthetics in the first half of the 20th century.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Short Story and The Private Library (Part I)

Given the tremendous demands on one's time in modern industrialized societies, we have always thought it interesting that more book collectors do not have a number of collections of short stories on their bookshelves. This literary form, born of oral storytelling traditions, is less complex, with fewer characters and plot devices, and appears far better suited to the pace of modern life, than its wordier cousins, novels and novellas. Short stories are just the right length for consumption during a subway ride, or a break during a hectic day, or the hour before dawn when one's household (hopefully) is still abed.
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Article

One should not miss this chance to learn and to collect! – Michèle Noret’s Catalogue 11

One year after her glorious Catalogue 10 Michèle Noret has published a new catalogue, again a wonderful collection of remarkable picture books and illustrated children's books of the 20th century. Collectors and antiquarians who know the market, also know, that it is absolutely no matter to bring together such a richness and variety of book-art. Michèle Noret obviously has a good nose for this sort of books, but it is not only her resourcefulness, that helps her, it is her great knowledge and competence and her aesthetic intelligence which lead her to find these wonderful books and graphic art - and(!) to describe them in an adequate and always informative way. Looking through her catalogues always means to get in touch with important names, styles, developments of book-art, specialties of illustrative art. The series of her catalogues (happy the collectors who kept them!) is like an international compendium of modern artist's books for children, indispensable for an intensive knowledge in this field, a real source book thanks to the many coloured illustrations. (A desideratum would be an index of titles and artists which comprehends all of the catalogues.)
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Article

No Rare Books, Just Whisky – Shackleton's Whisky Discovered in the Antarctic

They have been frozen for more than 100 years. Sir Ernest H. Shackleton had stored them in his hut in the Antarctic during his 1908 Antarctic expedition, before the famous explorer returned to Great Britain: five cases filled with bottles of whisky and brandy. The hut was restored in 2006 by the Antarctic Heritage Trust who found the cases. Now the Scotch is going to be thawed at the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch (New Zealand). Let's see whether the stuff is still drinkable …
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Article

On the Blog – Treasures of the Library Podcast: Dr Margaret Connolly Describes the Roll of Kings

In the podcast of the University of St. Andrews researchers and library staff report about their work in the library and with the library's rich treasures. This week Dr Margaret Connolly describes the Roll of Kings, a 15th century genealogical roll of the English monarchy, with a brief vernacular chronicle.
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Booksellers

50 Years of "Wiener Antiquariat" - 50 Jahre "Wiener Antiquariat"

On 6 December 2012 the "Wiener Antiquariat" celebrated its 50th anniversary. The history of one of the most famous antiquarian bookshops in Vienna spans several generations. It began in Kestölz in Hungary in the 19th century. From there, Michael Nebehay (1832-1895) moved to Vienna, where he first became a restaurant owner, then mayor of Sievering, until he lost his fortune in 1873 during the World Exhibition in Vienna. The youngest of his 16 children became an antiquarian bookseller: After his apprenticeship in Vienna Gustav Nebehay (1881-1935) went to Leipzig where he joined the well-known company C. G. Boerner and married Maria Sonntag, the sister of the book binder Carl Sonntag. During World War I they returned to Vienna, where he established his own business and became a friend of artists like Josef Hoffmann, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele.
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Article

Leonardo da Vinci's notebook "Codex Arundel" at the British Library

"This is to be a collection without order, drawn from many papers, which I have copied here, hoping to arrange them later each in its place, according to the subjects of which they treat."
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)
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