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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Autographs

›Sammlung Berge‹ geht nach Marbach

Published on 22 Nov. 2017
Das Deutsche Literaturarchiv Marbach hat kürzlich eine Frankfurter Privatsammlung zu Eduard Mörike erworben. Der Sammler Klaus Berge, verdientes Mitglied der Deutschen Schillergesellschaft und langjähriger Freund des Hauses, hat über mehr als drei Jahrzehnte hinweg sachkundig Handschriften, Erstausgaben, Widmungsexemplare, Grafiken und Gegenständliches von und zu Eduard Mörike sowie seinem Umkreis zusammengetragen.
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Autographs

Music and Theatre in Bohemia and Europe – The Autograph Collection of Fritz Donebauer (Prague)

Published on 22 May 2013
105 years ago, from 6th to 8th August, 1908, a famous 19th century autograph collection was auctioned by J. A. Stargardt in Berlin. The owner of the collection was Fritz Donebauer, born in 1849 as a son of a Bohemian innkeeper who became a banker and insurance agent in Prague, and most of all: a collector. In his lifetime he owned hundreds of autographs and manuscripts of mostly Bohemian theatre artists and musicians as well as rare documents from the history of Bohemia and the Thirty Years War. Little is known about Fritz Donebauer, whose collection came to auction in Berlin in April 1908, and even less is known about the private collectors, dealers and institutions who bought the documents, manuscripts and handwritten letters. Eberhard Köstler tries to reconstruct Fritz Donebauer's life and the fate of his famous collection.
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Autographs

The Alec Guiness Archive at the British Library

Published on 14 Feb. 2013
The British Library has acquired the personal archive of Sir Alec Guinness. The archive includes more than 900 of his letters to family and friends and over 100 volumes of diaries from the late 1930s to his death in the year 2000. The letters and diaries of the award winning British actor enrich the British Library's collection of archives of great 20th century artists along with those of Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson.
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Autographs

Dedication Copies and the Antiquarian Book Trade

Published on 09 Jan. 2013
How much is it worth? This question is most often asked by book collectors. And most often, there is not a precise answer. Although it is quite common nowadays to discuss rare books "as investments", the value of a book can hardly be counted in Dollars and Euros. It is even more difficult to measure the "worth" of dedication copies. Is the book inscribed by the author? Is this author famous and important, dead or alive? To whom is the book inscribed? Which words did the author choose to express his gratitude or sympathy? Eberhard Köstler, autograph specialist, gives examples of dedications by George Bernard Shaw, George Orwell, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann and many other authors, and he shows that nothing is binding when it comes to the "real worth" of dedications.
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Autographs

Provenance and The Private Library

Published on 29 Nov. 2012
In detective fiction and on the cop shows it's called "chain of evidence." Book collectors call it provenance. Unless you plan to build your private library solely with "hot off the press" titles, you need to understand provenance. The concept is important for all kinds of collectibles, from works of art to books to archaeological artifacts. Basically, it means: "to confirm or gather evidence as to the time, place, and if appropriate, the person responsible, for the creation, production or discovery of [an] object."
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1 - 8 / 22

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Interview with Dr. Ina Kok, Winner of the 2018 ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography

ILAB spoke to Dr. Ina Kok, winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography about her masterpiece.
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Article

Collecting Australian Bushranging Books

The Australian Bushranging era (1790–1890s) covered approximately the first 100 years of Australian settlement. Early bushrangers were mainly exconvict labourers from working class, Irish backgrounds who had been transported to Australia. Referred to in much of the literature as Bolters, they were rebels against authority who were attempting to survive in the bush by stealing from isolated settlers and travellers. The discovery of gold in the 1850's and 60's saw an upsurge in bushranging activity. Gold nuggets were relatively easy to steal, transport and sell and, because of this, many Australianborn sons joined the ranks of the bushrangers. A collecting tip by Maureen Fraher.
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Article

Collecting Harper Lee

A truly fine copy of To Kill A Mockingbird (1960) is a rare bird indeed. The black portions of the jacket rub easily to white (and are prime areas for "touchup" by booksellers who should have their magic markers confiscated by the book police), the brown portions fade, and the book itself tends to "cock " or slant from the spine.
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Article

You don’t by any chance know the way through this labyrinth, do you?

Having thought about it though, it did occur to me that the real problem with that Treasure Detectives malarkey was not even the fact that they had no clue what they were on about … more the fact that to someone "normal" it would be really hard to tell. If I were wandering the earth all besotted with books and suddenly had a windfall from a mysterious Romanian Great Uncle I'd never previously heard of, and I wanted to start collecting books … how would I go about it? First … there are rules. They are for you, and like all of the best rules, they are rules that don't just apply to book collecting.
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