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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Early Printing

History of Printing in Austria - Druckfrisch. Der Innsbrucker Wagner-Verlag und der Buchdruck in Tirol

Published on 04 June 2014
375 years ago Michael Wagner, a printer from Augsburg in Germany, founded a publishing house in Innsbruck, Austria, which is still existing today: Universitätsverlag Wagner. To celebrate the 375th anniversary of the publisher the Tyrolean State Museum Ferdinandeum has organized an impressive exhibition from 13th June to 26th October, 2014, accompanied by an attractive programme with lectures, concerts, guided tours, a children's workshop, and a conference with leading Austrian and international scholars and scientists, among them ILAB Patron of Honour Murray G. Hall.
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Early Printing

A Brief History of Broadsides

Published on 07 June 2013
Samuel F Haven, former librarian for the American Antiquarian Society, presided over one of the largest collections of broadsides in the world. Historians and rare book collectors alike cherish broadsides because they offer snapshots of moments in time, helping us to understand the zeitgeist of that era. Broadsides make ideal complements to a rare book collection, granting the collection greater depth and context.
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Early Printing

The 15th Century Equivalent of Your Cat Walking on Your Keyboard

Published on 26 Feb. 2013
"The 15th century equivalent of your cat walking on your keyboard", writes Rebecca J. Rosen, senior associate editor at The Atlantic, are ink pawprints in early printed books. "For cat owners, the scene is too familiar: You sit down to finally (finally!) get some work done, and along comes kitty, here to stroll across your keyboard." During the 15th century the ancestors of our beloved kitties walked across - incunabula. What is a big disgrace (or humiliation) for every serious collector, is nothing more than an everyday occurrence for cat lovers.
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Early Printing

Early Engraver Played His Cards Right

Published on 08 Nov. 2012
The "Meister der Spielkarten", or "The Master of the Playing Cards" is known only through the 106 engravings that have been attributed to him, including the set of playing cards that he is named for. The term "master" is reserved for someone who has completed an apprenticeship and ran his own workshop, teaching apprentices. His presumed students are also unknown but have similar names, such as "The Master of the Nuremberg Passion", "The Master of 1446", and "The Master of the Banderoles".
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1 - 8 / 17

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Book Restoration - Presentation by David H. Barry

One of our faithful contributors, book collector Maureen E. Mulvihill, sends news of a forthcoming guest presentation in St Petersburg, Florida, by Welsh-trained book restorer, David H. Barry.
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Article

Rare Objects with a Story - A catalogue published by Antiquariat Dasa Pahor GbR

It is not every day that a reviewer of catalogues has it this easy. To sum up the intention of this brilliant catalogue, I can do no better than to quote the introduction: "'Rare Objects with a Story' endeavours not to be your normal catalogue. It features only thirty items and makes no attempt to be a 'paint by numbers' production that features a balanced quota of well-known classics from each part of the world... Read more!
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Article

Rare Books in the Press - Mary Shelley letters discovered in Essex archive

A spectacular discovery! Previously unpublished letters written by the author of "Frankeinstein" Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley between the years 1831 and 1849 have been found in the Essex Record Office. Read the whole article by Esther Addley in The Guardian (January 8, 2014)
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Article

“When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes.”

Are you a book collector who fully comprehends this sentiment expressed by the Dutch philosopher and humanist, Erasmus of Rotterdam?
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - New York, New York!

Like the architect and sculptor Max Bill, Welti (1891–1934) belonged to the artistic new wave which characterised Zurich in the late 1920s, experimenting with abstract art and Dadaism. In 1932, it was Welti who was asked by Wilhelm Wartmann, director of the Zurich Kunsthaus, which was mounting a major Picasso retrospective, to look after the Spaniard during his visit. These early lithographs arose out of a visit Welti made to New York thanks to a 'Swiss Economic Study Tour to America', an initiative begun after the First World War.
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