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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 

From the Vault

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Art and the World's First Novel

What is generally acknowledged as the world's first novel was written by a Japanese woman a thousand years ago. The Tale of Genji, by Murakasi Shikibu (known as Lady Murakasi in the West), is regarded to be an accurate description of life in the imperial court in the Heian era (794 - 1185 CE). The daughter of a scholar and an officer of the court, she was given a male's education. Being a lady-in-waiting herself, she was privy to life at court.
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Article

'Med gamle bøker mot en ny tid' - 'With old books in modern times': 75 Years Norwegian Association

"Through the association the trade has organized themselves as managers and intermediaries of the cultural heritage of books. While the books are waiting for their new owners, it is the antiquarians that take care of them. It is they who bring about the material remains of our literary heritage to new readers, to collectors and institutions. Thus they secure great cultural values for the future, and they distinguish between the valuable and the worthless, between the inalienable and waste paper. Hence the antiquarians contribute, not only to preserve the cultural heritage; they also to a large extent, contribute to define it."
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Booksellers

Rare Books on Travel and Exploration: Brockhaus / Antiquarium 1856 - 2011

Brockhaus / Antiquarium is one of the oldest and renowned antiquarian bookshops for travel, the history of exploration and ethnology. It was founded in Leipzig, Germany, in 1856 as a department of the famous publishing house F. A. Brockhaus. The company is now based in Kornwestheim, near Stuttgart, as a part of Brockhaus / Commission GmbH, one of Germany's largest book distributors, and still owned by the Brockhaus family. What links Brockhaus / Antiquarium and the "Brockhaus Enzyklopädie", an encyclopedia found in nearly every German home and library during the 19th and 20th century?
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Article

Collecting – Arthur Conan Doyle: Social Justice Warrior

Arthur Conan Doyle was hardly a meek man, nor one prone to seeking diplomatic solutions when dramatic alternatives were available. When he attempted to enlist in the military forces he wrote that "I am fifty-five but I am very strong and hardy, and can make my voice audible at great distances, which is useful at drill." This audible voice proved to be very significant for two individuals in particular; George Edalji and Oscar Slater. My interest in these two men was sparked by our recent celebration of "Arthur Conan Doyle Week" at the end of May in honour of his birthday. Fortunately or otherwise, the Olympia bookfair has prevented me from typing up some of the more fascinating aspects of Doyle's life that I discovered during that week.
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Article

Bibliographies - American Literature

Online: American Authors on the Web - Early American Fiction Collection (1789-1875) - The Cambridge History of English and American Literature
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Article

Rare Book Cafe: A program for book lovers

We participated in an interesting project on Wednesday – the live broadcast of a conversation between book dealers in different parts of Florida on a new program called Rare Book Cafe. Although we had a formidable task before us – packing for the Brooklyn Books Art Photos and Design Expo – this little interlude on Wednesday afternoon was kind of fun, and a welcome respite. The project is sponsored by the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair, and is intended to serve as an online meeting place for people in the rare book trade and people who can't get enough of antiquarian books, who thrive on absorbing as much information as possible about them. You know who you are.
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