Skip to main content
results: 46 - 54 / 70

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
784_image1_gentle_madness.jpg
Collecting

A New Edition of A Gentle Madness - Catching up with Nick Basbanes

Published on 08 June 2012
Ask any book collector about his favorite classic of collecting, and Nick Basbanes' Gentle Madness, first published in 1995, is undoubtedly at the top of the list. Now an updated edition of this book about the "Eternal Passion for Books" has been published. Rebecca Rego Barry asked Nick Basbanes about the book, how it affected his career, and what he's currently working on. Some snippets:
[…] Read More
778_image1_ld_wine_1.jpg
Collecting

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - OenoLit and The Private Library

Published on 24 May 2012
Given that the first book printed from moveable type in Western Europe, the Gutenberg Bible, contains numerous references to wine, and given that the technology for printing that first book may itself have been modeled upon the screw press used to extract wine from grapes, this writer has always found it puzzling that the cultivation, processing, distribution and consumption of wine is rarely a major thematic element in works of fiction.
[…] Read More
749_image1_gg_ephemera1.jpg
Collecting

Collecting Rare Books - and Ephemera: Dandruff Piles

Published on 02 April 2012
Books sit squarely on shelves. They are discrete, replicable units. They have titles, authors, and places and dates of publication. They organize nicely into classes – "fiction" and "non-fiction," for example. There is agreed-upon language to describe condition, and there are bibliographical references that talk about the history and physical makeup of a book.
[…] Read More
748_image1_bibliodeviant_felicia_day.jpg
Collecting

Open The Pod Bay Doors, Hal!

Published on 02 April 2012
If there's one thing you can guarantee it's that the minute you think you're being smart is the minute before you meet someone much smarter. One of the reasons I love my job so very, very much is that my minutes of being smart never last long enough to knock my self image out of whack. If I'm not meeting a customer whose breadth of knowledge and devotion has the least admirable parts of me reaching for a pitchfork and a torch then it's one of my colleagues who is making me wish I could eat their head and consume their wisdom entire.
[…] Read More
650_image1_lorne_bair_warrenlunch2.jpg
Collecting

Why You Collect? Why I Collect. Why I Oughta… A Day With Comic Art Collector Warren Bernard

Published on 13 Oct. 2011
I'm curious to hear from readers about how, or whether, the concept of 'rarity' entered your lives, and how it has expressed itself. Have you become, like Warren, a passionate collector of some obscure and wonderful class of object? Or, like me, become a dealer - that is, someone with all of the instincts, but none of the patience, of a collector? Or were you that guy out in the Best Buy parking lot at 3 in the morning? And how have other circumstances in your life - relative wealth or poverty; marriage and children; career, religion, race, politics, sexual orientation - how do you reckon these have informed your collecting (or non-collecting) habits?
[…] Read More
630_image1_pl_101_1.jpg
Collecting

Book Collecting 101 at The Private Library

Published on 15 Sept. 2011
Anyone who has spent much time exploring Internet sites devoted to book collecting can be excused for coming away with the feeling that such collecting is too expensive and/or too complicated for the average person. The focus at too many such sites continues to be on great rarities, or on well-heeled collectors, or on events that the average working stiff can't possibly take time off from work to attend. Here at The Private Library, though, we contend that anyone can collect the printed book!
[…] Read More
556_image1_oak_knoll_wendorf_1.jpg
Collecting

The Literature of Collecting by Richard Wendorf

Published on 16 June 2011
Explorations into the world of books, libraries and the visual arts: Richard Wendorf, Stanford Calderwood Director and Librarian of the Boston Athenæum, provides a groundbreaking investigation of the relationship between the theoretical texts devoted to collecting and the fictional texts that also take collecting as their focus: not just John Fowles's "The Collector", but also Susan Sontag's "The Volcano Lover", Evan Connell's "The Connoisseur", Tibor Fischer's "The Collector Collector", Bruce Chatwin's "Utz", and Ian McEwan's early short story "Solid Geometry." Wendorf shows how the critical arguments posed by Benjamin, Baudrillard, Muensterberger and others play out in these modern literary texts and how, in turn, these fictional works complicate the ways in which we think about what it means to be a collector.
[…] Read More

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Livres à lire d’une seule main - Aristotle’s Master-Piece

Probably the most notorious seventeenth-century sex manual bore the strange title Aristotle's Masterpiece. This book bears a fake author's name — the Greek philosopher had nothing to do with it — in order to give the work some measure of respectability. The ruse didn't work; Aristotle's Masterpiece was banned in Britain until the 1960s. But the prohibition didn't keep it from circulating: it was one of the most notorious, and widely distributed, sex books in the English language.
[…] Read More
Article

The Magic of Encyclopedia Britannica's 11th Edition

"Despite its occasional ugliness, the reputation of the 11th persists today because of the staggering depth of knowledge contained with its volumes. It is especially strong in its biographical entries. These delve deeply into the history of men and women prominent in their eras who have since been largely forgotten – except by the historians, scholars, and antiquarian booksellers who champion the 11th for this quality."
[…] Read More
Article

“Knowledge Comes, but Wisdom Lingers”: An Inside Look at One of the Most Quoted Writers of All Time

In August of 1809, a boy was born in Lincolnshire, England, who would go on to become one of Britain's best loved poets. This boy was talented as a writer early on, and together with two of his brothers published a local book of poetry by the time he had turned 17. His family grew up rather close, and though he enrolled in Trinity College, Cambridge in 1827, he was forced to drop out before getting his degree and return home when his father passed away four years later. Do you know who it is yet? Some of you may have guessed, given the title quote of this blog. Once dropping out of Cambridge, Alfred Tennyson spent the next few years of his life taking care of his family. His second book of poetry, published in 1833, was met with quite a large amount of criticism from readers – despite it having the masterpiece "The Lady of Shalott" in it! Unfortunately Tennyson was not able to take the criticism in stride, and was put off of publishing again for a decade. Though not much time was spent above on detailing Tennyson's rather homely and happy childhood, it should be noted, due to the fact that it helped inspire much of his creative writing, that within this decade he experienced quite a few hardships – his close friend (and soon to be brother-in-law) Arthur Hallam died suddenly. Not only did his death shake the core of the family, but they then moved to Essex where they lost a large portion of their fortune in a bad investment. Tennyson moved to London, and lived modestly while continuing to write poetry.
[…] Read More
Article

Field & Tuer, The Leadenhall Press: A Checklist - An New Book By Matthew McLennan Young

Matthew McLennan Young is the author of Field & Tuer, The Leadenhall Press: A Checklist, the first comprehensive bibliography on this subject, which has recently been published by Oak Knoll Press. Andrew W. Tuer (1838-1900) was as one of the most influential printers of the Victorian period. With The Leadenhall Press he published hundreds of titles in almost every subject area, from sixpenny pamphlets to limited editions, periodicals like The Paper & Printing Trades Journal or The Printers International Specimen Exchange, Jerome K. Jerome's first book On the Stage - and Off and Sir Montague Shearman's Foot-Ball: Its History for Five Centuries. Matthew McLennan Young's outstanding work includes a portrait of Andrew Tuer and an annotated bibliography which lists nearly 450 publications by Field & Tuer and The Leadenhall Press from 1863 to 1913. For the Oak Knoll Biblio-Blog he has given an account of a post-publication discovery.
[…] Read More
Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Why I Bothered

"If you keep an open mind in this business, you learn something new every day." Greg Gibson on collecting the unusual: "Fire insurance mapping began in London in the 1700s, but it had never been applied with a systematic approach. In 1867 Daniel Alfred Sanborn, a surveyor from Massachusetts, saw the need for such a service, and quickly occupied that niche. By the late 1800s he had offices spanning the continent, sending out thousands of surveyors to record the footprints and construction details of buildings in American cities. Insurance companies could then use this information to write accurate policies, based on potential fire risk as documented by Sanborn's company."
[…] Read More
Article

16th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography Update

The 16th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography will be awarded in 2014 to one or more bibliographies or books about books published between 2009 and 2012. Seven books have already been submitted, among them bibliographies, biographies, library catalogues, studies on bookbinding and conference papers about "Early Printed Books as Material Object". They come from France, Italy, the United States, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre