Skip to main content
results: 10 - 17 / 17

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
Press Articles

Rare Books in the Press - 16th-century manuscript could rewrite Australian history

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
"A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history. The document, acquired by Les Enluminures Gallery in New York, shows a sketch of an apparent kangaroo (''canguru'' in Portuguese) nestled in its text and is dated between 1580 and 1620. It has led researchers to believe images of the marsupial were already being circulated by the time the Dutch ship Duyfken - long thought to have been the first European vessel to visit Australia - landed in 1606." Read the whole story by Charli Newton in The Age:
[…] Read More
1266_image1_nyt_prison.jpg
Press Articles

Rare Books in the Press - Prison Memoir of a Black Man in the 1850s

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
"Years ago, a rare-books dealer browsing at an estate sale in Rochester came across an unusual manuscript, dated 1858. The family selling it said little about where it had been for the last 150 years. It appeared never to have left upstate New York. Scholars now believe that the mystery manuscript is the first recovered memoir written in prison by an African-American, a discovery that Yale University says it made after authenticating the document and acquiring it for its Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library." Read the whole story in The New York Times.
[…] Read More
675_image1_dracula.jpg
Press Articles

Rare Books in the Press: Bibliophilia for Beginners

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
"You may think that no gift could be safer or tamer than a book. Rare books, however, are a different beast—if you're planning to buy one for a friend, or to treat yourself, remember the advice that is always given about dogs: They are not just for Christmas. In Arturo Pérez-Reverte's thriller "The Dumas Club," the satanic book dealer Varo Borja declares: "Becoming a book collector is like joining a religion: It's for life." All collecting is a disease, but lusting after rare books often strikes those without the bug as deranged. Unlike paintings or fine furniture, say, books are intrinsically mass-produced objects. What's more, you can look at a watercolor or a piece of porcelain without doing it any damage, but—according to the memoirs of the writer and collector John Baxter—a rare book loses $5 in value every time you open it."
[…] Read More
646_image1_adaseptember.jpg
Press Articles

„Aus dem Antiquariat“ - The September Issue of the German Magazine for Antiquarian Booksellers and Book Collectors

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
Gerd Rosen was a famous and exceptional antiquarian book dealer, with a remarkable career - and not without controversy. Although of Jewish origin, his contacts to the Nazi regime allowed him to keep working during the Third Reich. After the War he opened a gallery for contemporary art at the Kurfürstendamm in Berlin as early as 1945. The gallery became the centre of the new Berlin art scene, although Gerd Rosen quarrelled with its most prominent artists. A financial crises followed in 1950. Gerd Rosen had to close his gallery, but it took him only a short time to start a new career as an antiquarian bookseller, auctioneer, and bibliomaniac. The recent issue of the German magazine "Aus dem Antiquariat" presents an excellent article on Gerd Rosen's life and career which is, at the same time, a look back into the history of the German antiquarian book trade from the 1930s to the 1960s.
[…] Read More
501_image1_pages.jpg
Press Articles

Rare Books in the Press: The Death of the Book

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
The book is dead, murdered by the internet and buried with a Kindle on its coffin … Or not? The death of the book is not a modern phenomenon, says Ben Ehrenreich in the Los Angeles Review of Books: "Nor is it new to point out that people have been diagnosing - and celebrating - the book's imminent demise for generations." As early as 1913 a futurist manifesto demanded "a typographic revolution directed against the idiotic and nauseating concepts of the outdated and conventional book".
[…] Read More
Press Articles

"Our paper-based inheritance" - G. Thomas Tanselle

Published on 19 Aug. 2018
G. Thomas Tanselle in the Times Literary Supplement: "'We have to protect our paper-based inheritance'. The most fundamental reason for this necessity – this increasingly urgent necessity – is simply that manuscripts and printed books are artefacts; and all artefacts, being physical survivors, give us direct access to parts of a vanished world ..."
[…] Read More

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Reflections on Scouting, Part II

A few years ago I had a visit from Justin Schiller at my store and that visit initiated a lengthy period of meditation on an aspect of bookselling which, while largely unknown or of no interest to the public, is so central to bookselling that dealers constantly dwell on it.
[…] Read More
Article

The British Have Invaded, And They’ve Got Our Kids!

Now, for those of you unfamiliar with David A. Noebel's theories of Commie Rock-n-Roll Mind Control, here's a sample: "…The destructive music of the Beatles merely reinforces the excitatory reflex of the youth to the point where it crosses the built-in inhibitory reflex. This in turn weakens the nervous system to a state where the youth actually suffers a case of artificial neurosis. And the frightening, even fatal, aspect of this mental breakdown process is the fact that these teenagers, in this excitatory, hypnotic state, can be told to do anything – and they will…
[…] Read More
Article

The Italian Printing and the Mind of Man

Fabrizio Govi has published a work very similar to the PMM: "I classici che hanno fatto l'Italia proposes an ideal library of Italian authors from the Quattrocento to the present. These "classics that have made Italy" are a representative selection of Italian books - absolute masterworks, pioneering works in all fields, bestsellers of their times.
[…] Read More
Article

Charles Dickens: The Beginning of Modern Fandom?

As far as successful British 19th Century writers were concerned Charles Dickens was the commercial equivalent of J. K. Rowling. He was huge, without doubt the most popular novelist of his time and place. There are numerous possible reasons for his overwhelming popularity, but one deciding factor would be the broad nature of his readership. He wrote for everyone, and he did it at a shilling a go.
[…] Read More
Article

Former Official of the Ministry of Science Stole Thousands of Books from German Libraries

Over many years a former official of the Ministry of Science stole nearly 15.000 rare and valuable books from German libraries worth millions of euros. The thief was caught a year and a half ago in the Fürstlich Waldecksche Court Library, where he had been a frequent guest. Nobody there had ever thought that he had been the thief of 180 books worth 150.000 euros until he was arrested by the police. The book theft in the Court Library was one of many deeds, of which the former state official is now accused.
[…] Read More
Article

Latest news about the Girolamini Thefts

More than a year has passed since the discovery of the thefts and forgeries of books from the Girolamini Library. According to the judges, the director of the Library, Marino Massimo De Caro was primarily responsible for the thefts. He was arrested and convicted to seven years in prison in the first of several trials that he will have to face. This trial also involved his accomplices. The trial against several booksellers (including 3 ILAB affiliates), who according to the prosecutors have helped him in selling the stolen items, has been postponed to an as yet unspecified date.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre