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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
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Libraries

In the Press - What Became of the Jewish Books?

Published on 04 March 2014
All across Europe entire libraries belonging to Jews, Freemasons, Jesuits or Communists were looted by the Nazi regime. The books which were not burnt or destroyed were hidden by the Nazis for eventual use after the war. So, when World War II was over, the US-army officers who were part of the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Program, found millions of books which had been stolen by Nazis. In her article for The New Yorker Sally MacGrane reports about a project including an online exhibit and a virtual map which intends to document the history and the provenances of those books according to their library stamps.
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Libraries

“The most agreeable servants of civilization” – Booksellers and librarians in a changing world

Published on 25 Feb. 2014
United by the love of books: The Australian and New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers (ANZAAB) and the National Library of Australia will hold a joint conference on 19th and 20th May, 2014, in Canberra. This conference, the first of its kind held in Australia, brings together an impressive group of speakers to explore a variety of topics of particular interest both to rare booksellers and special collections librarians. It aims to enable these professionals to approach their work with greater acumen and understanding, and will afford a valuable opportunity for delegates to meet others with similar problems and interests. While the conference is aimed primarily at those working with rare books, manuscripts and photographs, it also contains much of value to anyone with a passion for our paper-based heritage. The lectures and panel discussions, held by antiquarian booksellers, scholars and librarians and among them Shef Rogers, Michael Treloar, ANZAAB President Jörn Harbeck, Sally Burdon and ILAB President Tom Congalton, focus on a variety of themes such as "The Magic of Books as Objects", "The Printed Image – Aspects of Photography and the Book", "Libraries and the Rare Book Trade", "Behind the Scenes in the Book Trade", and "Library Collections Revealed".
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Libraries

Rare Books on the Blog - Pacific Voyages: A Book That Sailed with Cook

Published on 06 Dec. 2013
"Among the volumes held by University of Melbourne Special Collections concerning British exploration of the Pacific, the book with the greatest link to the subject has nothing at all to do with it at least in terms of its topic. It is a medical text called An Introduction to Physiology (London, 1759), a compilation of lectures for students by the Scottish physiologist and instructor Malcolm Flemyng (ca. 1700–1764)..."
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Libraries

A Tragedy: Mali rebels torched library of historic manuscripts

Published on 30 Jan. 2013
Timbuktu was one of the main centres of Arab learning in Africa. The library of Timbuktu owned numerous manuscripts and scrolls. They were the impressive proof that "black Africa" did not only have an oral, but a powerful written history. Now the library had been burnt down by rebels, before the French troops reached Timbuktu. Read the whole article from The Guardian.
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Libraries

Collecting Literature on Socialism - The Libraries of Anton Menger, Theodor Mauthner, Wilhelm Pappenheim und Bruno Schönfeld

Published on 17 Dec. 2012
In the early years of the 20th century scholars and collectors like Anton Menger, Theodor Mauthner, Wilhelm Pappenheim und Bruno Schönfeld established huge collections of books, manuscripts and pamphlets on the history of socialism. Their famous libraries comprised thousands of books, and they were all situated in Vienna. Within the following decades all these libraries were destroyed or brought out of the country under different circumstances. Gerhard Oberkofler's profound study tracks the history of these famous libraries.
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Libraries

A day out for the rare book trade - St. Bride

Published on 03 Dec. 2012
We're planning a really festive and utterly splendid day out for the book trade on Thursday 13th December – an afternoon of activity, followed by the legendary ABA Christmas Party (none of this restricted to ABA members). The venue is to be the St. Bride Foundation in Blackfriars – and what a fine choice it is. The First Lady and I were there the other day for a preview of what's in store, at the invitation of the Chief Executive of the Foundation, the very amiable Glyn Farrow. Most booksellers are in thrall with their work, of course, but how nice to meet someone else so enthusiastic, so energetic and so palpably in love with his.
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28 - 36 / 59

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Rare books, prints, maps, photographs, manuscripts and ephemera for sale at the ANZAAB Antiquarian Book Fair

Douglas Stewart Fine Books is exhibiting rare colonial manuscripts, photographs and artworks, illustrated French children's books from the 19th century with Australian content, silk broadsides from a Melbourne playhouse in 1858, a rare photograph of the first Melbourne Cup trophy. The Lindsays are well represented with Fauns and Ladies and A Homage to Sappho, complemented by original paintings, drawings and etchings by Norman, Ruby and Lionel Lindsay. Also on offer are Rembrandt's etching The Hundred Guilder Print from 1649, the first edition of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species (with a manuscript and several signed photos), and an extraordinary 4 metre-long chromolithographed Panorama des Jardins Zoologiques illustrating a French zoo ca. 1880 with Australian animals.
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Booksellers

The Los Angeles Book Fair's New Dealers

The February 2010 Los Angeles Book Fair was a lovely fair with a chance for all of us to see old friends and colleagues. What was different this year was that there were quite a few new dealers. Impossible, people say ... the antiquarian book trade is dying with us old folks. If you think that, then you didn't come to the Los Angeles Book Fair where I got to talk to quite a few new dealers while Gordon took some pictures. I chatted with dealers who were very positive about being in the book trade and about being at the Los Angeles fair at the Century Plaza, an historic hotel located in Los Angeles' wealthy west side. I was also interested in hearing from the new dealers about how the "old" dealers treated them and everyone I spoke with (with some exceptions not chronicled here) thought they were very welcomed by the experienced dealers.

I wanted the new dealers to speak for themselves and so some of the comments here are from questions I asked and some are in answer to how they felt about the Los Angeles fair.
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Article

Book Scouting in Japan - Introduction: The Back Story

Rare book dealer and photography specialist Harper Levine travels through Japan with photographer John Gossage where Harper was welcomed at the airport as the "best book dealer (also best blogger) from East Hampton". Bibliophiles may follow his book scouting traces in Tokyo reading his fabulous blog.
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Article

iPhone App for Rare Books, Magnificent Manuscripts and Autographs: „Treasures of the Bavarian State Library“

Browse the treasures of the Bavarian State Library with your iPhone: the "Nibelungenlied", the Gutenberg Bible, rare manuscripts from the Orient and the Occident. The first iPhone App for book lovers.
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Article

The American Gift Book

In France the first gift book may have been ALMANACH DES MUSES, first published in 1765. This format was copied in Germany in 1770 with the publication of MUSEN-ALMANACH. In the 1790s some anthologies appeared in England that were clearly intended to be given as gifts, like ANGELICA'S LADIES LIBRARY, OR PARENTS AND GUARDIANS PRESENT (1794), which was followed by THE ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY (1799, 1800), edited by Robert Southey, and including twenty-seven poems and epigrams by Coleridge, plus contributions by Charles Lamb and Southey himself. A third volume was planned, but never appeared. These proto-gift books did not start a trend, and I know of no similar anthologies published in England during the next two decades. In the early years of the nineteenth century in Germany, some gift books (taschenbuch) were being issued in glazed paper boards, and in 1822 Rudolph Ackerman used those as his model when he published the first English gift book, the FORGET ME NOT, which he would publish without interruption for the next twenty-five years. Gift books like Ackerman's, which were issued year after year, became known as gift annuals, literary annuals, or simply "annuals." Since not all "annuals" were exclusively literary in their content, I will use the term "gift annual" to describe them as a subset of the broader family of gift books.
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Article

9th Australian and New Zealand Rare Books Summer School – 10th to 14th February 2014

Another exciting event down under: The State Library of Victoria announces the schedule of the 9th Australian and New Zealand Rare Books Summer School to be held at the library from 10th to 14th February, 2014. The program includes lectures and courses on books on architecture and design, natural history illustration, and private presses.
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