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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
Leonardo da Vinci's Library
Libraries

Leonardo da Vinci: reflected in his library

Published on 06 May 2019
Leonardo da Vinci was a tireless and inquisitive reader. He owned more than 200 books about science and technology as well as literary and religious topics. An exhibition organized by the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and the Berlin State Library at the Museo Galileo in Florence sheds new light on the intellectual cosmos of the artist, engineer, and philosopher, who remains as fascinating as ever 500 years after his death.
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UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
Libraries

ILAB Congress visits newly opened William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, L.A.

Published on 30 Jan. 2018
UCLA's William Andrews Clarke Memorial Library, renowned for its collection of rare books and manuscripts from England’s Tudor period through the 18th century, including the world’s largest repository of materials related to Oscar Wilde, has just reopened after extensive renovations. Participants of the upcoming ILAB congress, will visit the library as part of the extensive congress programme.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Robert Louis Stevenson’s Shocking Christmas Tale

On November 13, 1884, Robert Louis Stevenson received a request from the Pall Mall Gazette. The editors wanted a sensational story to publish in its special Christmas issue, and they offered Stevenson a generous £5 per 1,000 words. Woozy with morphine taken for a chronic cough, Stevenson complained that he wasn't up to the task of writing something new. So he dusted off a piece he'd written back in 1881: The Body-Snatcher.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books, First Editions and Ephemera - Fine printing, fine dining

Sir Sydney Roberts, Secretary of Cambridge University Press, 1922–48, writes: 'The early 1920s were marked by a typographical renaissance which had a notable influence upon book-production; or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that the war interrupted a movement which had already begun … It is true that during the 'nineties new standards had been applied to the printing of poetry and belles-lettres, but it was not till after the war that publishers as a whole began to recognise that the basic principles of book-design could, and should, be exemplified as clearly in a half-crown textbook as in a three-guineaédition de luxe …
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Article

Charity Auction – Celebrate UNESCO World Book & Copyright Day with AntiquarianAuctions

When the Mexican wave of ILAB Pop Up Fairs reaches South Africa on 23 April 2015, a very special and generous event dedicated to the ILAB fundraising campaign on UNESCO World Book and Copyright Day will come to an exciting end. Cape Town based antiquarian bookseller Paul Mills and AntiquarianAuctions.com are offering a charity item in auction #42 to support the UNESCO literacy projects in South Sudan.
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Booksellers

John Windle

The idea that I wanted to surround myself with books seemed ridiculous to my adopted parents. They wanted me, an unwanted war baby with an unknown American father, to go into the Army, be a good soldier, kill some people and make a man of myself.
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Article

REUTERS.COM - 1,800 Rare Booksellers Worldwide Strike a Blow for Literacy

"What do Skype, a film star, literacy problems in South Sudan, and two women dealing in rare books and manuscripts have in common? They are the driving force behind a chain of worldwide events to create a more literate world. This April the booksellers of the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) will again celebrate UNESCO's World Book and Copyright Day with a chain of events one after another around the world. Organising a chain of worldwide events is not easy as Australian Sally Burdon and German Barbara van Benthem, both members of ILAB, have found, particularly as they live 16,285 kilometres apart and all the organisation was done by Skype and email. Not easy, but it can be done!"
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Article

The Art of American Book Covers - Ball Covers Identified by Lee Thayer

In 1970 Charles Gullans and John Espey conducted two interviews with Emma Redington Lee Thayer (1874–1973), co-founder (with Henry Thayer) of Decorative Designers, the New York firm that created thousands of book cover designs. The firm was started about 1895 by Henry, Emma joined him the following year, they married in 1909, were divorced in 1932 and DD closed. In 1919 Lee Thayer, as she then called herself, published her first mystery novel, which was followed by another 60, the last issued in 1966.
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