Skip to main content
results: 1 - 8 / 27

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
1749_image1_perkamentus_seren1.jpg
Book Binding

Collecting - Serendipity and The Private Library

Published on 27 Nov. 2015
I visited a little antiquarian shop in Weesp (not far from Amsterdam) to do a little browsing. After half an hour I was done and ready to leave. I was taking a last look at the shop's shelf of House of Orange books (books about the Dutch Royal House) when my eye was drawn to a book with an interesting but untitled spine. The book turned out to be a catalog of an exhibition of portraits and objects relating to the House of Orange-Nassau on the occasion of the inauguration of Her Majesty Queen Wilhelmina (1898).
[…] Read More
1679_image1_minsky_amelia1.jpg
Book Binding

American Publishers' Bindings on the Books of Amelia E. Barr 1882-1918

Published on 11 Sept. 2015
Today hardly anybody knows the name Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, yet a hundred years ago she was among the most prolific and popular women writing in America. If it were not for the decorated bindings on her books I would not have known she existed. Some of the best cover artists were assigned to her works, including Thomas Watson Ball, Alice Cordelia Morse, Evelyn W. Clark, Blanche McManus Mansfield, Amy Richards, William Snelling Hadaway, Harry B. Matthews, Theodore Brown Hapgood and the Decorative Designers.
[…] Read More
1678_image1_norbertmorgenstern.jpg
Book Binding

23 Wiener Werkstätte Bindings for Max Morgenstern – On Show in Vienna, until October 2015

Published on 09 Sept. 2015
In January 2015 Norbert Donhofer presented an extraordinary gathering of bibliophile treasures documented in a richly illustrated catalogue. The second part of this amazing collection will now be on display at the Grillparzerhaus in Vienna from 24 September to 9 October 2015. Max Morgenstern was one of the best customers of the Wiener Werkstätte. The Jewish collector belonged to a generation of Viennese bibliophiles who founded libraries with great knowledge, ultimate taste and a life-long passion. The precious bindings of the Morgenstern Collection, now on show at the Grillparzerhaus in Vienna, are a shining example of the outstanding artworks created during the Viennese Belle Epoque.
[…] Read More
1633_image1_minsky_peggy1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Covers - A Previously Unknown Amy M. Sacker Cover

Published on 03 June 2015
One exciting find was Amy M. Sacker's design on Sweet Peggy by Linnie S. Harris [Little, Brown & Company, 1904]. Like many of their rebound books, the replacement endpapers are acidic, have turned brown and are disintegrating, but this does not affect the cover art. Considering the amount of use this volume must have had, the design remains bright on the cover and spine, with just a few smudges that can be cleaned. What's exciting about it? It's not just that it's a good cover design by an important artist, and one that adopts Thomas Watson Ball's style of clouds. This is a rare book.
[…] Read More
1502_image1_minsky_fred1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Cover - Frederick W. Gookin

Published on 20 Nov. 2014
When trying to learn more about F. W. Gookin, the first few biographical notes I found did not even mention his work as a book cover designer. I thought, "Maybe this Frederick William Gookin (1853–1936) is the wrong one." He was the Buckingham Curator of Japanese Prints at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he is described as "a lifelong Chicagoan."
[…] Read More
1461_image1_minsky_ball_1.jpg
Book Binding

The Art of American Book Covers - Ball Covers Identified by Lee Thayer

Published on 06 Oct. 2014
In 1970 Charles Gullans and John Espey conducted two interviews with Emma Redington Lee Thayer (1874–1973), co-founder (with Henry Thayer) of Decorative Designers, the New York firm that created thousands of book cover designs. The firm was started about 1895 by Henry, Emma joined him the following year, they married in 1909, were divorced in 1932 and DD closed. In 1919 Lee Thayer, as she then called herself, published her first mystery novel, which was followed by another 60, the last issued in 1966.
[…] Read More

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Message from the ABAA (US): California Autograph Law amended

The ABAA-sponsored bill in California, AB 228, has been signed into law by the Governor of California and is now in effect.
[…] Read More
Article

Provenances - „Provenienzen“: 42th Seminar held by the German Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association in Cologne in May 2012

From 17th to 20th May, 2012, members of the German Antiquarian Booksellers' Association met in Cologne for their 42th annual seminar. In a series of lectures the problem of provenances and the restitution of looted art and books was discussed with librarians, lawyers and specialists. The history of fate of famous collections were reconstructed, such as the libraries of Victor Manheimer and Elise and Helene Richter. Other lectures centred around the history of typography, the making of artists' books, and the identification of the age and the provenances of books through the paper on which of they were printed. Highlights of the weekend were excursions to some famous libraries situation in Cologne: the Dom- und Diözesanbibliothek with its numerous treasures of medieval manuscripts, Ungers-Archiv für Architekturwissenschaften and the Petrarca and Proust collections of Professor Dr. Reiner Speck. Read the report (in German) by Meinhard Knigge.
[…] Read More
Article

Rare Books in the Press - Mary Shelley letters discovered in Essex archive

A spectacular discovery! Previously unpublished letters written by the author of "Frankeinstein" Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley between the years 1831 and 1849 have been found in the Essex Record Office. Read the whole article by Esther Addley in The Guardian (January 8, 2014)
[…] Read More
Congress

1947 - Amsterdam

Barbara Kaye Muir: A Bookseller's Wife Looks at Her Diary
In 1977, the 24th ILAB Congress and 7th ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair took place in Düsseldorf, Germany. On this occasion, Karl H. Pressler, former editor of the German booksellers' magazine "Aus dem Antiquariat", published a special issue with articles about the League and its history written by representatives of the international rare book trade such as Menno Hertzberger, Helmuth Domizlaff, Percy H. Muir, Georges A. Deny, Dr. Lotte Roth-Wölfle, Stanley Crowe, and Barbara Kaye Muir.The wife of Percy H. Muir, a celebrated author, accompanied her husband to many congresses and meetings from the beginnings in 1947 up to the 1960s. Some of her memoirs were published in her books "Second Impression" and "The Company We Kept", published by Oak Knoll Press and Werner Shaw Ltd. In 1947 Barbara Kaye Muir joined her husband Percy on his trip to the Preliminary Conference in Amsterdam where the Presidents of the ten founding associations of the League came together on invitation of Menno Hertzberger. She witnessed the official discussions and talks behind the scenes along with the life and economic situation in Post War Amsterdam - and she received a lesson in drinking Dutch Genever.
[…] Read More
Article

A World Much Changed - Laurence Worms in Conversation with Jim Hinck and Anne Marie Wall

Time now to go and have tea with some booksellers. Anne Marie Wall and Jim Hinck (Hinck & Wall) are booksellers specialising in garden history and landscape architecture, early horticulture, and architecture and town-planning in general. Americans both, they have settled in Cambridge after a spell in Paris (where they retain a pied-à-terre). It's an absorbing story. They realised, much earlier than most of us, that with the advent of the internet, the book-trade's traditional staples – the good, solid and essential books on any subject that everyone needs – were about to become a rapidly diminishing asset. As Jim puts it in a thoughtful recent post on his viaLibrian blog (required reading), "the pool of findable books exploded". Their customers, often in American institutional libraries, were no longer going to want books they could find anywhere at the click of a mouse. The correct deduction was made that they would continue to want the rare and the unique, and that American holdings would generally be weakest in early non-English language material. To Europe they came to find just that material.
[…] Read More
Article

James Cook and the Exploration of the Pacific

Three expeditions into the uncharted waters of the Pacific Ocean – and a tragic end on Hawaii. James Cook (1728–1779) was the first to map New Zealand, Australia and the South Pacific islands. He formed our modern image of the world and refuted once and for all the existence of a mythical Terra Australis Incognita.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre