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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
 
Grolier Club NY
Bibliography

Bibliography Week New York 21 - 25 January 2020

Published on 14 Jan. 2020
BIBLIOGRAPHY WEEK happens each year in New York City at the end of January when the principal national organizations devoted to book history have their annual meetings. Other groups plan interesting events, too, since so many bibliophiles are in town. Some events (not noted here) are open to members only, but mostly you are encouraged to show up everywhere: get a sense of what is going on in the book world, hear some interesting papers, schmooze over cocktails ...
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1 - 8 / 2046

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Overly (litho)graphic?

Sometimes, as a bookseller, you come across something which you really can't quite believe exists, and something that you will probably never see again. This collecting tip by Simon Beattie is better than any steak and kidney pie.
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Article

Tante Trude’s Adventures at the 55th London International Antiquarian Book Fair

"Book fairs are fun and you learn a lot, but they do make your feet hurt!" As every year, Frank Werner of Brockhaus/Antiquarium exhibited at the International Antiquarian Book Fair in London. But this year was different. The book fair took place in the bigger and most beautiful National Hall at Olympia, and Frank Werner was accompanied by his aunt. It was the first book fair for Tante Trude, as he calls her, and she was excited!
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: It's Purely Academic at The Private Library

Anyone who reads much so-called academic fiction may be forgiven for thinking that some of the folks teaching our sons and daughters are, for the most part, a bunch of narcissistic, neurotic misfits (Malcom Bradbury: The History Man; Elain Showalter: Faculty Towers). Although the rise of this fictional genre began in earnest in the mid 1950s, its roots can be traced as far back as Anthony Trollope's 1857 novel of provincial Anglican preferment, Barchester Towers, and - more to the point - George Eliot's Middlemarch (1872).
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Article

Derek Walker of McNaughtan's about the new Rare Books Edinburgh Festival

Rare Books Edinburgh is a new festival taking place from 20th to 30th March 2017, which brings together ten different institutions and organisations to celebrate book culture, collecting, and the history of the book.
The programme includes talks, workshops, and exhibitions, and incorporates the Edinburgh Book Fair, jointly run by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association and the Provincial Booksellers Fairs Association. The Edinburgh Book Fair is the largest antiquarian and collectable book fair in Scotland, this year featuring over forty specialist booksellers from around the UK. They will be offering for sale rare and collectable books and printed material of all kinds at a wide variety of price points. The fair will be opened by bestselling author and 'king of tartan noir' Ian Rankin OBE, creator of Inspector Rebus.
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Article

Rare Book Selling - a Man’s World?

"Women have less bite and competence", are "prone to self-doubt" and "fear of losing their livelihood". Women have a different time management system and "cannot handle large sums of money". Women are part-time booksellers and specialise in children's books, they "have a rich partner in the background", or they work in the profession until "Mr. Right" comes along and marries them. Good old prejudices – they still exist ...
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Article

Veronese, His Legacy, Among 17th Century Book Publishers, Art Collectors, & Printmakers

This essay is an immersive, illustrated review of the spectacular Veronese show at the Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida (2012-13); but it also educates readers on Veronese's legacy in the 17th century among book publishers, printmakers, and (mostly) Stuart art connoisseurs. Drawing upon an extended Gallery of Images (21 images, including some fine installation shots, all with extended caption notes by the author), the essay demonstrates the fabled invention, wit, and clever humor of this "Happiest of Painters", as Henry James wrote of Veronese. The essay gives special prominence to the currency of Veronese in the 17th-century book culture and print culture (Images 6,7,14). The author's dedicatees are three prominent book specialists: Robert J. Barry, Jr.; John T. Shawcross; and Peter A. Tasch.
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