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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
Book Collecting Now Cover
Collecting

New publication by Chatwin Books (US) looks at today's book collecting

Published on 14 May 2019
Indeed, “Books don’t just furnish a room,” Michael Dirda writes in Browsings. “. . . Digital texts are all well and good, but books on shelves are a presence in your life. As such, they become a part of your day-to-day existence, reminding you, chastising you, calling to you. Plus, book collecting is, hands down, the greatest pastime in the world.”
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Leonardo da Vinci's Library
Libraries

Leonardo da Vinci: reflected in his library

Published on 06 May 2019
Leonardo da Vinci was a tireless and inquisitive reader. He owned more than 200 books about science and technology as well as literary and religious topics. An exhibition organized by the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and the Berlin State Library at the Museo Galileo in Florence sheds new light on the intellectual cosmos of the artist, engineer, and philosopher, who remains as fascinating as ever 500 years after his death.
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Salon du Livre 2019
Book Fairs

Un salon à la page !

Published on 18 April 2019
Un salon en pleine expansion... Le SALON LIVRES RARES & OBJETS D’ART qui s’est tenu sous la nef du Grand Palais du 12 au 14 avril réunissait 181 libraires dont 55 étrangers venant de 14 pays différents, et 52 experts en objets d’art.
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Provenance Symposium
Booksellers

ILAB Provenance Symposium now available to view online

Published on 10 April 2019
Today marks the 1st International Provenance Research Day with more than 60 cultural institutions in Germany, Great Britain, Austria, the Netherlands and Switzerland organizing large number of symposiums and workshops at museums, archives and libraries.  Coinciding with this important initiative, ILAB launches the videos of the New York Provenance Symposium.
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Collecting Rare Books, First Editions and Cartoons - Syd Hoff

th September is the birthday of cartoonist and children's book author Syd Hoff (1912), who is best remembered for his Danny and the Dinosaur (1958) and more than 60 books in the HarperCollins beginning reader "I Can Read" series. Hoff sold his first cartoon to The New Yorker at age 18. His work also appeared in Esquire, Look magazine and other publications. Under the pseudonym A. Redfield, Hoff produced a cartoon series The Ruling Clawss for the Communist newspaper The Daily Worker in the 1930s and 1940s. He also illustrated advertising for Eveready Batteries, Jell-O, Rambler and other brands. But it was the children's books that brought him the greatest recognition.
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Article

Under the Auspices

A safari to the remote corners of my own house this week – and from there to the attics of my mind. In fact just having a clear-out to make way for all the fresh purchases (really must do a catalogue). Then I came across a printed guide for the Antiquarian Book Fair to be held at the Europa Hotel, Grosvenor Square, on the 13th-15th June 1972 – "under the auspices" of the ABA.
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Article

Manuscripta mediaevalia - Medieval Manuscripts Online

75.000 medieval manuscripts, available online: Manuscripta mediaevalia is a joint venture of the State Library Berlin (Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin / Preußischer Kulturbesitz), the State Library Munich (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München) and the German Documentation Centre for the History of Arts (Deutsches Dokumentationszentrum für Kunstgeschichte - Bildarchiv Foto Marburg).
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Article

Collecting - The Father of California Viticulture’s Middle Child: Arpad Haraszthy & Wine Writing in California

In hindsight, we know Arpad Haraszthy was born to make wine. His father, Agoston Haraszthy (also known as "The Father of California Viticulture"), founded the Buena Vista Vinicultural Society in California after the 1857 establishment of his Buena Vista vineyard in Sonoma. Hungarian-American wine maker, writer and world traveler, Agoston Haraszthy moved to the United States in 1842 (when his son Arpad was only 2 years old), first settling in Wisconsin, there founding the first Wisconsin vineyards. A challenging endeavor, he gave up his attempts to grow grapes in the mid-west and moved his family to San Diego, California. Though he was active in political town-goings-on in San Diego, Agoston found he was once again disappointed in the local viticulture possibilities, and the family once more relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area, settling (this time for good) in Sonoma. To make a long (& mobile) story short, Agoston finally found what he was looking for in the Sonoma Valley. He and his family settled down. So Arpad Haraszthy grew up surrounded by wine aficionados (for example, Charles Krug was employed at the winery) – it seemed merely a matter of time before he himself entered the profession.
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Booksellers

Sotheran’s: 250 Years of Bookselling

It's rare that an antiquarian bookshop should have a history as long and rich as the jewels of its stock. But with Sotheran's in London's Sackville Street celebrating its 250th anniversary this year, it can justifiably lay claim to the title 'oldest antiquarian bookshop in the world'. James Sprague tells Beatie Wolfe about an amazing history and the unique pressures of maintaining such an important name.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Rousseau and Women

Today is the 300th birthday of the great philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, so I thought I'd post this book from 1792, 'On Rousseau's connections with women', by Carl Gotthold Lenz (1763–1809), described by one bibliography as 'a rarity of the very first order' (which it is).
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