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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Carl Sandburg

Sandburg material is sought by collectors of poetry, and for his excellent biography of Abraham Lincoln. While the prices of his books tend to be modest ...
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Congress

2017 - Copenhagen

Every year, the presidents of all 22 national antiquarian bookseller’s associations that form the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), meet at the President’s Meeting or an ILAB Congress. For 2017, the Danish Antiquarian Bookseller’s Association ABF has invited the international rare book trade to Copenhagen. This will be a week of formal meetings with reports and updates from each country, but it is also a week of exchanging ideas with colleagues, networking and a programme to visit some of Copenhagen’s cultural and bibliophile treasures!
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Article

Rare Books and Suicide Bombers

"Walking into the New York Antiquarian Book Fair in Manhattan's Armory, you get a sense of what suicide bombers must feel when they enter paradise and start in on those 72 virgins. For a bibliopsycho, like me, this was paradise at its most varied and delectable."
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Article

Lawyers open cache of unpublished Kafka manuscripts

Franz Kafka wanted all his manuscripts to be burned after his death, but his friend Max Brod disregarded the request. Now a Swiss bank opens for safety deposit boxes containing manuscripts and letters.
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Article

Books in Hard Times Draws a Crowd

"The hotly anticipated Books in Hard Times conference held at the Grolier Club on September 22, 2009 drew 150 collectors, booksellers, and librarians. The usual suspects were in attendance along with a few new and young faces. One might have expected the mood to be dark and somber, but even before the opening remarks, the tenor of conversation in the audience was optimistic."
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Charles Dickens’ Debt to Henry Fielding

When Charles Dickens' sixth son was born on January 16, 1849, the boy was named for one of Dickens' favorite authors. Supposedly Dickens had first thought to name the boy after Oliver Goldsmith, but he feared the child would be ridiculed as "Oliver always asking for more." Instead he named his son Henry Fielding Dickens, after legendary 18th-century author Henry Fielding. Though Dickens was born too late to meet Fielding, his predecessor had a profound impact on Dickens' work.
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