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Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
Jessica Jordan
Collecting

Five Young Women With Prize-Winning Book Collections

Published on 11 Sept. 2018
The Paris Review, 7th September 2018: In 2017, Honey & Wax Booksellers established an annual prize for American women book collectors, aged 30 years and younger. The idea took shape when Heather O’Donnell and Rebecca Romney, the bookstore’s owners, observed that “the women who regularly buy books from us are less likely to call themselves 'collectors' than the men, even when those women have spent years passionately collecting books."
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Bookhunter on Safari - Confessions
Collecting

The Confessions of a Book-Hunter – 1926

Published on 20 July 2018
“I belong to that class of unfortunate beings who are addicted to a habit which it is not easy to break off. This sounds alarming, but let me assure you that neither drug nor dram is the cause of my undoing, and that I have no intention of following in the foot-steps of the English Opium-Eater. The truth is that I am a bibliophile, and I suffer a complaint common to the tribe, namely a feverish appetite which can only be assuaged by choice tit-bits in the form of ancient quartos and duodecimos”.
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Colin Franklin Prize
Collecting

Ekaterina Shatalova, winner of the 2017-18 Colin Franklin Prize for book-collecting

Published on 15 June 2018
The 2017-18 Colin Franklin Prize for book-collecting has been awarded to Ekaterina Shatalova (Keble College), for her collection of works by and about Edward Lear (1812-1888), the poet and illustrator famous for limericks in "A Book of Nonsense", and for poems recounting the nautical adventures of "The Owl and the Pussycat" and the "Jumblies" ('who went to sea in a sieve').
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Collecting

Winner of the James D. Forbes Collecting Prize 2017 - University of St Andrews (UK)

Published on 28 Nov. 2017
Arthur der Weduwen, PHD candidate at the University of St. Andrews in the UK, has just received the James D. Forbes Collecting Prize which has been awarded annually since its inauguration in 2015. The prize is named after the university's famous graduate and later professor (1833) and principal (1859), James David Forbes (1809 - 1868). Arthur der Weduwen has permitted ILAB to publish his report here.
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Collecting

The Book Huntresses: Women Bibliophiles

Published on 17 July 2017
In his 1930 work on book collecting, Anatomy of Bibliomania, Holbrook Jackson claimed that "book love is as masculine (although not as common) as growing a beard." Times have changed; the recent inauguration of a new book collecting prize by New York bookseller Honey & Wax, "an annual prize of $1000 to be awarded to an outstanding book collection conceived and built by a young woman", is possibly the final nail in the coffin of the idea that bibliophilia is a man's pursuit.
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Collecting

Book Collecting in the News - Lithub.com: 10 Famous Book Hoarders

Published on 23 June 2017
Ten famous book "hoarders" were selected for this article by Emily Temple for Lithub.com, published on 22 June 2017. Book collecting is a passion and lifelong occupation. Some celebrity collectors are named in the article; fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld, TV chef and author Nigella Lawson, filmmaker and producer George Lucas and more. While we might disagree with the term "hoarder", this is an interesting insight into the world of book collecting. To build a valuable and curated collection, it is advisable to contact or work with a bookseller affiliated to the International League of Antiquarian Books (ILAB).
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Collecting

Announcing a New Annual Prize for Young Female Book Collectors

Published on 31 May 2017
A message and wonderful initiative from Honey & Wax Booksellers, Brooklyn, NY:Here at Honey & Wax, we take a particular interest in the evolving role of women in the rare book trade, on both the buying and selling sides. The great American book collector Mary Hyde Eccles, the first woman elected to the Grolier Club, noted that a collector must have three things: resources, education, and freedom. Historically, she observed, "only a few women have had all three, but times are changing!"
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From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Rare Books in the Press - The Books We Talk About (and Those We Don’t)

"What is the social function of the novel? I'm not thinking about the pay-off for the author, who gets to develop a skill and earn a living from it and accrue a prestigious public image into the bargain. Nor about the rewards for the publisher, who may, or more likely may not, make a significant amount of money. Nor even the pleasure for the individual reader, who enjoys hours of entertainment and maybe feels enlightened or usefully provoked along the way. What I'm asking is, what's in it for society as a whole, or at least for that part of society that reads novels?" What's in a book for the community of readers? Tim Parks says in his highly inspiring article: It's CONVERSATION!
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Booksellers

In Memoriam Mitsuo Nitta, ILAB Member of Honour

I was deeply saddened to learn that Mitsuo Nitta, President of Honor of the ABAJ, Member of Honor of ILAB, CEO at Yushodo Ltd., former Chair of the ILAB-Breslauer Prize for Bibliography, legendary bookseller and friend to so many of us, has passed away on October 27 of 2015. Mitsuo Nitta played a leading role in developing antiquarian bookselling not only in Japan but also in the surrounding countries like Korea and China, and he had been teacher and friend for generations of younger booksellers. His role in spreading out ILAB's device "Amor Librorum nos unit" in East-Asia cannot be underestimated. Since my first meeting with Mitsuo Nitta back in 1988 during the Congress in Paris, we had been in constant contact, and I will always remember countless discussions about ILAB with him, the last one – alas - only earlier this year in Tokyo.
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Article

Encyclopaedias

Encyclopaedia Britannica
The biggest and best online Encyclopaedia, accurate and up-to-date reference. The articles are written by more than 4,000 contributors and editors chosen from all over the world for their high standing in their fields of expertise. Each article, picture and video is fact-checked by Britannica editors for consistency of style and language level. L'Encyclopédie
The famous „Encyclopedie" by Denis Diderot and Jean d'Alembert. First published between 1751 and 1777, the 32 volumes include 21 volumes of text with more than 70,000 articles on subjects ranging from asparagus to zodiac. The other 11 volumes contain beautifully engraved plates illustrating many of the articles. The Encyclopédie was the major achievement of the French Enlightenment whose aim was to "change the common way of thinking" (Diderot) through the expansion of knowledge and the development of critical modes of thought. The website makes the monumental encyclopaedia accessible to English-language readers. If you prefer a modern reprint, however, go to www.frommann-holzboog.de, and if you adore the original volumes, browse the metasearch on www.ilab.org Brockhaus Encyclopaedia
The German „Britannica" in 30 volumes with 300.000 items – the most important German encyclopaedia is online now. However, you can only browse it, if you have bought a password with the CD-Rom edition.Wikipedia
The open online encyclopaedia: multi-language, multi-functional, millions of items and links. Beware: Although all articles are checked, there can be mistakes.Zedlers "Universal-Lexicon"
The largest German encyclopedia of the 18th century: Johann Heinrich Zedlers Grosses und Vollständiges Universal-Lexicon aller Wissenschaften und Künste was originally published in 68 volumes with more then 288.000 items about the knowledge, the thinking and the curiosities of the pre-enlightenment.
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Article

The Warburg Institute Library, London, is once again in danger, 80 years after being saved from the Nazis

The Warburg Institute Library holds about 350,000 books. It was originally founded in Hamburg by Aby Warburg (1866-1929), one of the most brilliant intellectuals of the 20th century. Warburg's enormous collection – which documents the history of the Renaissance and the influence of antiquity on modern culture in an interdisciplinary approach - was transformed into a scholarly institution called Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek Warburg. The library was located in Hamburg (Germany) until the year 1933. Four years after Aby Warburg's death his collection had to be brought out of the country because it was in danger of being destroyed by the Nazis. The Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek Warburg was relocated in London, 1944 it became associated with the University of London, and in 1994 it became a founding institute of the University of London's School of Advanced Study.
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Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - The Short Story and The Private Library (Part I)

Given the tremendous demands on one's time in modern industrialized societies, we have always thought it interesting that more book collectors do not have a number of collections of short stories on their bookshelves. This literary form, born of oral storytelling traditions, is less complex, with fewer characters and plot devices, and appears far better suited to the pace of modern life, than its wordier cousins, novels and novellas. Short stories are just the right length for consumption during a subway ride, or a break during a hectic day, or the hour before dawn when one's household (hopefully) is still abed.
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