Skip to main content
results: 1 - 8 / 117

articles

Rare Books and the Rare Book Trade
view_over_cph_querformat_c_martin_heiberg.jpg
Congresses and Meetings

2017 - Copenhagen

Published on 16 Aug. 2017
Every year, the presidents of all 22 national antiquarian bookseller’s associations that form the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), meet at the President’s Meeting or an ILAB Congress. For 2017, the Danish Antiquarian Bookseller’s Association ABF has invited the international rare book trade to Copenhagen. This will be a week of formal meetings with reports and updates from each country, but it is also a week of exchanging ideas with colleagues, networking and a programme to visit some of Copenhagen’s cultural and bibliophile treasures!
[…] Read More

From the Vault

A sneak peek in our archives

Article

Provenance and The Private Library

In detective fiction and on the cop shows it's called "chain of evidence." Book collectors call it provenance. Unless you plan to build your private library solely with "hot off the press" titles, you need to understand provenance. The concept is important for all kinds of collectibles, from works of art to books to archaeological artifacts. Basically, it means: "to confirm or gather evidence as to the time, place, and if appropriate, the person responsible, for the creation, production or discovery of [an] object."
[…] Read More
Article

Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Maurice Maeterlinck

You want a collecting tip? Here's one for American collectors: don't collect Maurice Maeterlinck! He was wildly popular in the wake of his Nobel Prize, in the early part of the 20th century. His books appeared in beautifully designed editions, that might even beguile the discerning collector of today.
[…] Read More
Article

Bookbinding and Collection Maintenance

Around January and February collectors may find one or two, sometimes more of their leather books with broken joints. "It just happened, it wasn't like that last time I looked". Extremes in temperature can make a book's structure change and flex ...
[…] Read More
Article

Collecting - The Humorous and Absurd World of Medieval Marginalia

For most of the Middle Ages, the only way to reproduce a book was to copy it by hand. Copying was solitary, lengthy, and physically taxing work. Scribes worked long hours, in contorted positions, and abided by rigid expectations. At heart, it was a droning process, too, allowing the copier only the ability to transfer the words of another. Consequently, many scribes developed a sense of humor to break up the monotony of their hand-cramping task. It was well-deserved, for without these scribes, we would have lost an unfathomable amount of our artistic and cultural history — from antiquity onward. Luckily, we can find evidence of their playful spirits in the margins of their very manuscripts, where illustrated miniatures and writings reveal the creative personality behind the pen.
[…] Read More
Article

24th ILAB International Antiquarian Book Fair - 27th to 30th September 2012

The World's Best Booksellers Meet in Switzerland! The 24th International Antiquarian Book Fair presents the best of the trade. From manuscripts and incunabula to avant-garde, from Erasmus, Philipp Melanchthon and Charles Darwin to Leonardo da Vinci, Pablo Picasso, DADA and the Bauhaus artists – together with the Fine Art Zurich, this most important event, supported by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), will change Zurich into the international market place for everything rare, extravagant and beautiful.
[…] Read More
Article

Humperdinck’s „Hänsel und Gretel“ - Kitalálta, megcsinálta: A mai "Jancsi és Juliska" elé

The German composer Engelbert Humperdinck (1854-1921) is best known for his opera "Hänsel und Gretel". He began working on it in Frankfurt in 1890. He first composed four songs to accompany a puppet show his nieces were giving at home. Then, using a libretto loosely based on the version of the fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm, he composed a "Singspiel" of 16 songs. The opera premiered in Weimar on 23 December 1893, under the baton of Richard Strauss, who called it "a masterpiece of the highest quality". With its synthesis of Wagnerian techniques (Humperdinck had assisted Wagner 1880/81 in his production of Parsifal) and traditional German folk songs, Hänsel und Gretel was an overwhelming success. In 1923 the London Royal Opera House chose it for their first complete radio opera broadcast. Eight years later, it was the first opera transmitted live from the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Eduard Hanslick, a Bohemian-Austrian music critic, attended the premiere of „Hänsel und Gretel" in Vienna. The former supporter, then severe critic of Richard Wagner published his impressions of Humperdinck's opera in 1894. Adam Bösze has translated the text into the Hungarian language for his blog on rare books and the history of music.
[…] Read More
fermer la fenêtre